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Pepys and the Taverns in his diaries

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

Pepys wrote his diary from 1660 for nine years. This was the same year Charles II was restored to the throne, and Pepys became the Clerk of the Acts to the Navy board. He was clerk to Downing when he commenced his diary on January 1st, 1660, and then lived in Axe Yard, close by King Street, Westminster, a place on the site of which was built Fludyer Street. This, too, was swept away for the Government offices in 1864-65. He lived here until July 1660, when he moved to Seething lane to the Navy Office opposite the Church of St Olave.

Now onto the pubs and taverns mentioned in Pepys diary.

I so far have discovered the Mitre, in Fenchurch street, better known in his diaries as Rawlinsons. The good news is I have even found enough detail to add this to the pub history site, although it is long gone, and in the parish of St Dionis Backchurch.

The Great fire of London destroyed massive sections of London, including 13,200 houses;

London was rebuilt by imposing a tax on coal imports to pay for the new build. New laws were brought into being which banned the usage of timber houses; i.e. a basic set of building regulations which imposed restrictions on heights of buildings, types of materilas used in rebuilding, street widths allowing for air to reach the ground areas, and a limit on no buildings within 40 feet of the Thames.

01. Anchor,

by Doctors common. [] - "thence to the Anchor, by Doctor’s Commons, and there Dr. Williams and I did write a letter" 13th Septembet 1661. It is important to note that the Doctors commons were originally in Paternoster row (just north of St Pauls) before the Great Fire, and they were later in Knightrider street when they were rebuilt.

02. Angel,

King street, Westminster. [Tavern near west side, near south end, kept by William Wells (d 1663). 9 Hearths 1664. ] A Will Carter has a farthing token, #1596, at the Angel, King street.

“ Thence by appointment to the Angel in King Street, where Chetwind, Mr. Thomas, and Doling were at oysters, and beginning Lent this day with a fish dinner.”—Pepy’s Diary, March 7, 1659-60

03. Angel,

Tower Hill. Angel Tavern, is at the lower end of Tower Hill. See the tokens #3201 & B1197 in the Beaufoy collection. Pepys refers to the Angel in the plague, as being shut up!

04. Axe

 [Axe yard, Westminster, west side and kept by Elizabeth Drury, widow (1660-66), with 14 Hearths in 1665; she had 9 hearths in 1664 ] Axe yard in King street, Westminster, is now Fludyer Street, which  stands on the site of Axe Yard, and derived its name from a great messuage or brewhouse on the west side of King Street, called “The Axe,” and referred to in a document of the 23rd of Henry VIII—B.

05.Bear, Bridge foot

On the 24th March 1660-61 Pepys mentions the Beare, similar to below, i.e. "So home again, and took water with them towards Westminster; but as we put off with the boat Griffin came after me to tell me that Sir G. Carteret and the rest were at the office, so I intended to see them through the bridge and come back again, but the tide being against us, when we were almost through we were carried back again with much danger, and Mrs. Pierce was much afeard and frightened. So I carried them to the other side and walked to the Beare, and sent them away, and so back again myself to the office, but finding nobody there I went again to the Old Swan, and thence by water to the New Exchange ..", and again a brief mention on the 3rd June 1661

"This night going through bridge by water, my waterman told me how the mistress of the Beare tavern, at the bridge-foot, did lately fling herself into the Thames, and drowned herself; which did trouble me the more, when they tell me it was she that did live at the White Horse tavern in Lumbard Streete, which was a most beautiful woman, as most I have seen". - Pepys 21st February 1666-67

Bridge foot. - On the south end of the bridge, and kept by Abraham Browne, vintner, in 1667 (and  Cornelius Cooke, vintner, in 1650). Pulled down in 1761 when houses on bridge demolished. Also see the tokens #235 - 237 in the Beaufoy collection.

06. Bear, Drury Lane.

[Probably the Bear and Harrow, in Bear yard, off Butcher row. A continuation of the lane towards the Strand. ]

On the 18th and 27th February 1667-68 Pepys states : " I to the Hall, and there met Sir W. Pen, and he and I to the Beare, in Drury Lane, an excellent ordinary, after the French manner, but of Englishmen; and there had a good fricassee, our dinner coming to 8s., which was mighty pretty, to my great content;" and then "and so with my wife, and Mercer, and Deb., who come to the Hall to me, I away to the Beare, in Drury Lane, and there bespoke a dish of meat; and, in the mean time, sat and sung with Mercer; and, by and by, dined with mighty pleasure, and excellent meat, one little dish enough for us all, and good wine, and all for 8s., "

On the 4th May 1668, we have "Thence, going out, Mrs. Pierce called me from the gallery, and there I took her and Mrs. Corbet by coach up and down, and took up Captain Rolt in the street; and at last, it being too late to go to the Park, I carried them to the Beare in Drury Lane, and there did treat them with a dish of mackrell, the first I have seen this year, and another dish, and mighty merry; and so carried her home, and thence home myself, well pleased with this evening’s pleasure ..."

 

07. Bear,

Fleet street. [near Salisbury court. Probably the Bear described as at Fleet Bridge; actually on  south side of Fleet street and near Bride lane. 8 Hearths in 1664.]

08.Bell,

The  King street, Westminster. . In existence by 1400; demolished in about 1750.  Listed in detail in the token #695 of the Beaufoy collection

09. Bell,

The  Strand.  [Large Inn, known as the Bell, Maypole near St Mary le Strand. Kept by Thomas Lisle (1664). 26 Hearths in 1664.] A token #1100 exists to John Dollen by a bell pierced by a Maypole. Other sources along with this token refer to stabling and carriage hire from the Bell yard at the Maypole

10. Black Spread Eagle,

Bride Lane. On the 7th September 1663, Pepys talks about eating alone at this establishment, " And so I to my Lord Crew’s, thinking to have dined there, but it was too late, and so back and called at my brother’s and Mr. Holden’s about several businesses, and went all alone to the Black Spread Eagle in Bride Lane, and there had a chopp of veale and some bread, cheese, and beer, cost me a shilling to my dinner, and so through Fleet Ally ..."

11. Black Swan,

Holborn. Marked on Ogilbys map - 006-3. Black Swan Inn, Holborn, A81. Pepys refers to it in his diary on the 9th August 1668, when, on Lords Day "Up, and walked to Holborne, where got John Powell’s coach at the Black Swan, .."

12. Blue Balls

 On the 26th March 1668, the Blue Balls get a mention in Pepys diary, after a visit to the theatre ,where the King was also visiting. " Thence, by agreement, we all of us to the Blue Balls, hard by, whither Mr. Pierce also goes with us, who met us at the play, and anon comes Manuel, and his wife, and Knepp, and Harris, who brings with him Mr. Banister, the great master of musique; and after much difficulty in getting of musique, we to dancing, and then to a supper of some French dishes, which yet did not please me, and then to dance and sing; and mighty merry we were till about eleven or twelve at night, with mighty great content in all my company, and I did, as I love to do, "

13. Bottle of Hay

 The Bottle of Hay is mentioned on the 7th August 1667, when Pepys records in his diary, "My wife abroad with her maid Jane and Tom all the afternoon, being gone forth to eat some pasties at “The Bottle of Hay,” in St. John’s Street, as you go to Islington, of which she is mighty fond, ..". St John street is generally recorded in census and parish records as being in Clerkenwell.

14. Brazen-nose Tavern

 On the 21st August 1660, Pepys records ".. and with Mr. Moore towards London, and in our way meeting Monsieur Eschar (Mr. Montagu’s man), about the Savoy, he took us to the Brazennose Tavern, and there drank and so parted, and I home by coach .."

And again on the 8th August 1661, he states. " In the evening I took Mons. Eschar and Mr. Moore and Dr. Pierce’s brother (the souldier) to the tavern next the Savoy, and there staid and drank with them."; which is very likely to be the same venue; or this could also be the Castle when he states on the 23rd of August 1667 : "So being all dusty, we put into the Castle tavern, by the Savoy, and there brushed ourselves".

The Savoy appears to be a French chapel, or church; and still exists today as the Queens chapel, located south of the Stand, and by the Savoy Hotel.

15. Bridge

# There is a case of the Bridge Tavern being noted, on the 2nd February 1659-60 when he states "I went to the Temple to Mr. Calthrop’s chamber, and from thence had his man by water to London Bridge to Mr. Calthrop, a grocer" and then "After I had received the money we went to the Bridge Tavern and drank a quart of wine and so back by water, landing Mr. Calthrop’s man at the Temple and we went homewards". This probably suggests the Bridge Tavern being on or at the London Bridge.

16. Bull Head

"Bensons", Cheapside., at 3 Bread street, Cheapside. A Bull Head exists in Cheapside which has a token #312 in 1650 with initials T E B. Pepys in his diary alludes to the Bull Head Tavern on four separate occasions.

On the 6th February 1659-60 : "At noon my father dined with me upon my turkey that was brought from Denmark, and after dinner he and I to the Bull Head Tavern, where we drank half a pint of wine and so parted."

On the 20th March 1659-60 : "He and I and Chetwind, Doling and Luellin dined together at Marsh’s at Whitehall. So to the Bull Head whither W. Simons comes to us and I gave them my foy [feast] against my going to sea"

On the 27th August 1660, "From thence with Mr. Mount, Luellin, and others to the Bull head till late, and so home, where about to o’clock Major Hart came to me, whom I did receive with wine and anchovies, which made me so dry that I was ill with them all night, and was fain to have the girle rise and fetch me some drink."

And on the 29th August 1660,  "To my office at the Privy Seal in the afternoon, and from thence at night to the Bull Head, with Mount, Luellin, and others"

17. Bull Head,

New Palace Yard, Westminster.

18. Bull Inn,

Bishopsgate.

19. Cardinals Cap,

Cardinals Cap Alley. A token B1756 is listed which refers to the Cardinals Cap in Lombard street.

Between Nos. 77 and 78 [Lombard Street] is a passage leading into Cornhill. Although the name of it is unknown, there is no doubt but that it is the Cardinal
Cap Alley. By 1683, this tavern is called the Cock

20. Castle Tavern,

by Exeter House, Strand; and also noted as by the Savoy. The Castle is noted when he states on the 23rd January, 1666-67 : " I to the Castle Tavern, where was and did come all our company, Sir W. Batten, [Sir] W. Pen, [Sir] R. Ford, and our Counsel Sir Ellis Layton, Walt Walker, Dr. Budd, Mr. Holder, and several others, and here we had a bad dinner of our preparing,"

The 26th March 1667 was noted, "hence towards White Hall through Tower Street, and it is the best way) to Exeter House, where the judge was sitting, and after several little causes comes on ours, and while the several depositions and papers were at large reading (which they call the preparatory), and being cold by being forced to sit with my hat off close to a window in the Hall, Sir W. Pen and I to the Castle Tavern hard by and got a lobster, and he and I staid and eat it, and drank good wine;"

And, "did go away by water to the Castle Taverne, by Exeter House, and there met Sir W. Batten, [Sir] W. Pen, and several others," on the 27th March 1667

And in the 23rd of August 1667 : "So being all dusty, we put into the Castle tavern, by the Savoy, and there brushed ourselves". The Savoy appears to be a French chapel, or church; and still exists today as the Queens chapel, located south of the Stand, and by the Savoy Hotel.

A token B2746 exists of the Castle, to a John Peek, and 'against ye Savoy'.

21. Chatelins,

Covent Garden.

22. Chequer,

Charing Cross.

23. Chequer,

Holborn.

24. China alehouse

In October 1661, there is a mention of China ale - "I to the Wardrobe to dinner, and there staid most of the afternoon very merry with the ladies. Then Captain Ferrers and I to the Theatre, and there came too late, so we staid and saw a bit of “Victoria,” which pleased me worse than it did the other day. So we staid not to see it out, but went out and drank a bottle or two of China ale, and so home ..."

The 17th January 1662-63 entry fro Pepys diary mentions "I took Creed by coach and to the Duke’s playhouse, where we did see “The Five Hours” entertainment again, ... Thence with him to the China alehouse, and there drank a bottle or two, and so home, ..."
#

25. Coach and Horses,

"Games", Aldgate . Also see the token #78  listed with the Beaufoy collection. from Baynes; and referencing John Game.

26. Cock, Bow street,

by Covent Garden - (reference Oxford Kate's), and also listed as at the corner of Suffolk street

27. Cock, Strand,

near Temple Bar (token B3037 of the Cock Ale house in 1655 is pictured here) - actually the Cock, in Fleet street.

On 14 March 1661, Pepys mentions in his diary "Dined with my Lord and Lady, and so with Mr. Creed to the Theatre, and there saw “King and no King,” well acted. Thence with him to the Cock alehouse at Temple Bar, where he did ask my advice about his amours, and I did give him it .."

 

28. Cock,

Threadneedle street. Also, this is listed as at Little Bartholomew and " the Cock eating-house behind the Royal Exchange,". Several early tokens exists naming Robert Dawson and also Will Bolton.

## Cock, Barnet

, near Barnet hill, on the Great North road and a locality known as Underhill.

29. Cross Keys,

Cripplegate. Possibly on the east side of Whitecross street

Pepys states in his diary on the 21 June 1665 "So homewards and to the Cross Keys at Cripplegate, where I find all the towne almost going out of towne, the coaches and waggons being all full of people going into the country. Here I had some of the company of the tapster’s wife a while, and so home to my office"

30. Crown,

Bloomsbury.

31. Crown,

Hercules Pillars Alley. An ordinary in alley south of Fleet street, kept by William King.

32. Crown,

King street, "Wilkinsons".

33. Crown,

New Palace Yard.

Pepys mentions in his diary on the 21 October 1660 (Lords day) ; "So leaving my boy at the Abbey against I came back, we went to Prior’s by the Hall back door, but there being no drink to be had we went away, and so to the Crown in the Palace Yard, I and George Vines by the way calling at their house, where he carried me up to the top of his turret, where there is Cooke’s head set up for a traytor, and Harrison’s set up on the other side of Westminster Hall. "

And 18 July 1663 : " So to the Temple, Wardrobe, and lastly to Westminster Hall, where I expected some bands made me by Mrs. Lane, and while she went to the starchers for them, I staid at Mrs. Howlett’s, who with her husband were abroad, and only their daughter (which I call my wife) was in the shop, and I took occasion to buy a pair of gloves to talk to her, and I find her a pretty spoken girl, and will prove a mighty handsome wench. I could love her very well. By and by Mrs. Lane comes, and my bands not being done she and I posted and met at the Crown in the Palace Yard, where we eat a chicken I sent for, and drank, and were mighty merry, and I had my full liberty of towzing her and doing what I would, but the last thing of all.... Of which I am heartily ashamed, but I do resolve never to do more so."

34. Crown,

near Royal Exchange. The Royal Exchange is between the southern side of Threadneedle street; and northern side of Cornhill.

To confuse matters, the Crown is listed under Threadneedle street, being Thomas Blagrove named on the token #1158

35. Custom House Tavern

# On the 21st July 1665, Pepys mentions a visit to the Custom House Tavern - "So Colvill was the only man I could yet speak withal to get any money of. Met with Mr. Povy, and I with him and dined at the Custom House Taverne, there to talk of our Tangier business, and Stockedale and Hewet with us."

36. Devil,

- in Temple Bar, Fleet street e.g. token B3037 “ Wadlow the Vintner, at the Devil in Fleet Street, did lead a fine company of soldiers, all young comely men in white doublets.”—Pepys’ “ Diary,” April 22, 1661

37. Dog Tavern,

- Westminster. This has at least eleven references in Pepys diary, and is listed as token #696 in King street, Westminster

10th October 1666 : "Thence with him to Westminster, to the parish church, where the Parliament-men, and Stillingfleete in the pulpit. So full, no standing there; so he and I to eat herrings at the Dog Taverne.  .."

38. Dolphin,

Bishopsgate.

39. Dolphin,

The Tower street. Pepys records more than a dozen visits to this house, probably closer to fifty.  [In Tower street] A token #B3225 of 1650 exists of the Dolphin Tavern (#3225)

40. Falcon,

Bankside.

##.

Falcon,

Petty Cury - this is in Cambridge.

41. Feathers,

Old Fish street.

42. Five Bells


#

43. Fleece,

Cornhill.  [Tavern in a  passage off south side, just west of Birchin lane. Cowpers court now marks the site. Kept by William Hinton, vintner in 1660; and after the fire by Nicholas Colborne. It had 16 Hearths in 1664.]  Also see the tokens #B724 listed with the Beaufoy collection. from Baynes.

44. Fleece,

Covent Garden. Large Tavern, on west side of Bridges street (now Catherine street). It was kept by William Clifton, vintner & overseer for the poor in 1644. After his death, his widow, Martha took over the running of the house. It had 24 Hearths in 1664. Tokens B736 and B737 exist which notes William Clifton on their reverse side, one is a farthing, the other a penny.

In 1st December, 1660, Pepys notes that "Mr. Shepley and I went into London, and calling upon Mr. Pinkney, the goldsmith, he took us to the tavern, and gave us a pint of wine, and there fell into our company old Mr. Flower and another gentleman; who tell us how a Scotch knight was killed basely the other day at the Fleece in Covent Garden, where there had been a great many formerly killed. So to Paul’s Churchyard, and there I took the little man at Mr. Kirton’s and Mr. Shepley to Ringstead’s at the Star, and after a pint of wine I went home, my brains somewhat troubled with so much wine, and after a letter or two by the post I went to bed."

45. Fleece,

Leadenhall street.

46. Fountain,

Old Bailey. [Tavern on west side of Little Old Bailey, kept by Nathaniel Holhead and Thomas Manning, 17 Hearths, 1664 ]

47. Fountain,

The Strand.

48. Fox,

King street, Westminster

49. George,

Holborn conduit. Marked on Ogilbys map - 006-6. George Inn, Holborn Bridg, A92 ?? This shows it as a coaching inn on south side, by a yard named after it, and about half-way between Holborn conduit and Holborn bridge.

50. Georges,

Lambeth.

51. Glasshouse inn,

Broad street.

52. Globe,

Cornhill.
Pepys mentions the Globe in Cornhill, just the once.
19th November 1660 : "After that to Westminster Hall, and there hearing that Sir W. Batten was at the Leg in the Palace, I went thither, and there dined with him and some of the Trinity House men who had obtained something to-day at the House of Lords concerning the Ballast Office. After dinner I went by water to London to the Globe in Cornhill, and there did choose two pictures to hang up in my house.."

53. Globe,

Eastcheap. [Tavern, in Little Eastcheap. traceable 1636 to 1663]

21st January 1662-63 : "So to the Dock again, and took in Mrs. Ackworth and another gentlewoman, and carried them to London, and at the Globe tavern, in Eastcheap, did give them a glass of wine, and so parted." is when Pepys mentions the Globe in Eastcheap.


54. Globe,

Fleet street. [Tavern on north side, just west of Shoe lane, and by Peterborough court. It had 18 hearths in 1664. Burnt in the Fire of London, and rebuilt.]
The Globe in Fleet street is mentioned twice by Pepys in his diaries, firstly :
On the 26th October 1663 : " and so back to Cornhill to Moxon’s, but it being dark we staid not to see any, then to coach again, and presently spying Sir W. Batten; I ‘light and took him in and to the Globe in Fleete Streete, by appointment, where by and by he and I with our solicitor to Sir F. Turner about Field’s business, and back to the Globe, and thither I sent for Dr. Williams .."
And again, two years later :
On 24th March 1665 : "Up betimes, and by agreement to the Globe taverne in Fleet Street to Mr. Clerke, my sollicitor,"

##. Globe, Deptford

All other mentions of the Globe appear to be in Dartford as follows - the first after Pepys tries tea for the first ever tiome:
25th September 1660 : "And afterwards I did send for a cup of tee’ (a China drink) of which I never had drank before, and went away. Then came Col. Birch and Sir R. Browne by a former appointment, and with them from Tower wharf in the barge belonging to our office we went to Deptford to pay off the ship Success, which (Sir G. Carteret and Sir W. Pen coming afterwards to us) we did, Col. Birch being a mighty busy man and one that is the most indefatigable and forward to make himself work of any man that ever I knew in my life. At the Globe we had a very good dinner, and after that to the pay again, which being finished we returned by water again, and I from our office with Col. Slingsby by coach to Westminster"
12th January 1660-61 : "With Colonel Slingsby and a friend of his, Major Waters (a deaf and most amorous melancholy gentleman, who is under a despayr in love, as the Colonel told me, which makes him bad company, though a most good-natured man), by water to Redriffe, and so on foot to Deptford (our servants by water), where we fell to choosing four captains to command the guards, and choosing the places where to keep them, and other things in order thereunto. We dined at the Globe, having our messenger with us to take care for us."
13th January 1660-61 : "So to the Globe to dinner, and then with Commissioner Pett to his lodgings there (which he hath for the present while he is building the King’s yacht, which will be a pretty thing, and much beyond the Dutchman’s), and from thence with him and his wife and daughter-in-law by coach to Greenwich Church, where a good sermon, a fine church, and a great company of handsome women. After sermon to Deptford again; where, at the Commissioner’s and the Globe, we staid long."
16th April 1661 : "From thence to Commr. Pett’s lodging, and there had a good breakfast, and in came the two Sir Wms. from Walthamstow, and so we sat down and did a great deal of public business about the fitting of the fleet that is now going out. That done we went to the Globe and there had a good dinner, and by and by took barge again and so home. "
6th June 1661 : "Called up this morning by Lieutenant Lambert, who is now made Captain of the Norwich, and he and I went down by water to Greenwich, in our way observing and discoursing upon the things of a ship, he telling me all I asked him, which was of good use to me. There we went and eat and drank and heard musique at the Globe .."
11th April 1662 : "At Woolwich, up and down to do the same business; and so back to Greenwich by water, and there while something is dressing for our dinner, Sir William and I walked into the Park, where the King hath planted trees and made steps in the hill up to the Castle, which is very magnificent. So up and down the house, which is now repayring in the Queen’s lodgings. So to dinner at the Globe, and Captain Lambert of the Duke’s pleasure boat came to us and dined with us, and were merry, and so home .."
3rd December 1662 : "Called up by Commissioner Pett, and with him by water, much against my will, to Deptford, and after drinking a warm morning draft, with Mr. Wood and our officers measuring all the morning his New England masts, with which sight I was much pleased for my information, though I perceive great neglect and indifference in all the King’s officers in what they do for the King. That done, to the Globe, and there dined with Mr. Wood, and so by water with Mr. Pett home again"
18th November 1663 : "I and Mr. Hater by water to Redriffe, and so walked to Deptford, where I have not been a very great, while, and there paid off the Milford in very good order, and all respect showed me in the office as much as there used to be to any of the rest or the whole board. That done at noon I took Captain Terne, and there coming in by chance Captain Berkeley, him also to dinner with me to the Globe. "
5th May 1665 : "Thence home by water, and presently down to Woolwich and back to Blackewall, and there, viewed the Breach, in order to a Mast Docke, and so to Deptford to the Globe, where my Lord Brunkard, Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. Batten, and Commissioner Pett were at dinner, having been at the Breach also .."
22nd August 1665 : "Thence I to Deptford, where by appointment I find Mr. Andrews come, and to the Globe, where we dined together and did much business as to our Plymouth gentlemen; and after a good dinner and good discourse, he being a very good man, I think verily, we parted and I to the King’s yard"
13th September 1665 : "Up, and down to Tower Wharfe; and there, with Batty and labourers from Deptford, did get my goods housed well at home. So down to Deptford again to fetch the rest, and there eat a bit of dinner at the Globe, with the master of the Bezan with me, while the labourers went to dinner."

55. Goat,

Charing Cross. [Tavern between the Chequer Inn at the south west corner of St Martins lane and the Royal mews further west. The block now part of Trafalgar square.]

56. Golden Eagle,

New Street. On the 21st July 1660, Pepys states "This morning Mr. Barlow had appointed for me to bring him what form I would have the agreement between him and me to pass, which I did to his lodgings at the Golden Eagle in the new street [Still retains the name New Street.] between Fetter Lane and Shoe Lane, where he liked it very well, and I from him went to get Mr. Spong to engross it in duplicates."

57. Golden Lion,

Charing Cross. On the 16th January 1659-60, Pepys writes in his diary "After that Sheply, Harrison and myself, we went towards Westminster on foot, and at the Golden Lion, near Charing Cross, we went in and drank a pint of wine, and so parted, and thence home"

58. Golden Lion,

The Strand. On the 28th December 1668, Pepys notes that "o by chance got a coach and to the Golden Lion Taverne in the Strand, and there drank some mulled sack, and so home .. "

There are a number of Golden Lion tokens for the Strand; including #1113 and #1114, the latter dated 1657, the former was a farthing token to Francis Jeffery.

59. Grange,

Portugal Row.

60. Green Dragon,

Lambeth Hill. On 16th January 1659-60, the Green Dragon is mentioned in Pepys diary, whence "hence we went to the Green Dragon, on Lambeth Hill, both the Mr. Pinkney’s, Smith, Harrison, Morrice, that sang the bass, Sheply and I, and there we sang of all sorts of things, and I ventured with good success upon things at first sight, and after that I played on my flageolet, and staid there till nine o’clock, very merry and drawn on with one song after another till it came to be so late. After that Sheply, Harrison and myself, we went towards Westminster on foot, and at the Golden Lion, near Charing Cross, we went in and drank a pint of wine, and so parted, and thence home". There is a token #708 for the Green Dragon, on Lambeth Hill, Upper Thames street, in 1651 with initials I E H (or J E H)

61. Greyhound,

Fleet street. [Tavern, probably on south side near to Salisbury court. Burnt in the Fire. ] .

The Greyhound gets a few mentions in the diary of Pepys.

On the 28th February 1659-60, we have ".. which we did at the Plough in Fleet Street by my Lord’s direction, but not as for him. Here we met with Mr. Pierce a little before, and he took us to the Greyhound Tavern, and gave us a pint of wine, and as the rest of the seamen do, talked very high again of my Lord. "

On the 12th November 1661, we have "Thence to the Greyhound in Fleet Street, and there drank some raspberry sack and eat some sasages, and so home very merry. "

Greyhound,

Tower street - Pepys, January 18, 1660-1 : “ I took Mr. Holder to the Greyhound, where he did advise me above all things, ....” [In Tower street] shows details of a Greyhound token in Tower street, with initials on it of G D A.

62. Gridiron,

Shoe Lane. The Gridiron has a mention in Pepys diary on 12th September 1661 when he writes "From thence to Dr. Williams (at the little blind alehouse in Shoe Lane, at the Gridiron, a place I am ashamed to be seen to go into),"

63. Grotto,

Kensington. On the 17th April 1668, Pepys writes in his diary " Thence, with Brouncker, to the King’s house, and saw “The Surprizall,” where base singing, only Knepp,’ who come, after her song in the clouds, to me in the pit, and there, oranges, 2s. After the play, she, and I, and Rolt, by coach, 6s. 6d., to Kensington, and there to the Grotto, and had admirable pleasure with their singing, and fine ladies listening to us: with infinite pleasure, I enjoyed myself: so to the tavern there, and did spend 16s. 6d., and the gardener 2s. Mighty merry, and sang all the way to the town, a most pleasant evening, moonshine, and set them at her house in Covent Garden, and I home and to bed."

And the 18th May 1868, "I carried them to Kensington, to the Grotto, and there we sang, to my great content, only vexed, in going in, to see a son of Sir Heneage Finch’s beating of a poor little dog to death, letting it lie in so much pain that made me mad to see it, till, by and by, the servants of the house chiding of their young master, one of them come with a thong, and killed the dog outright presently."

64. Half Moon,

Strand. [Large Tavern on north side, opposite New Exchange and on south west corner of Bedford street (later Half Moon street). It was kept in 1642-1662 by John Doe, vintner and churchwarden. In 1664 by Henry Henderson. There were 17 Hearths in 1664. ] See token #961 of the Half Moon behind the Change

65. Halfway House,

Rotherhithe [Riverside eating house half way between London bridge and Deptford c 1660 to 1800. ]

66. Harp and Ball,

near  Charing Cross, Roberts's. []

On the 3rd July 1665 : "and I to the Harp and Ball, and there staid a while talking to Mary, and so home to dinner. After dinner to the Duke of Albemarle’s again, and so to the Swan, and there ‘demeurais un peu’de temps con la fille’, and so to the Harp and Ball, and alone ‘demeurais un peu de temps baisant la’, and so away home and late at the office about letters, and so home, .."


67. Harpers,

King street, Westminster. [Tavern on east side immediately outside King street gate of Whitehall Palace, and almost opposite Axe yard. Kept until 1638 by Henry Hayer, and next his widow (died 1669), and from 1664 by son James. There are 13 Hearths in 1664. ]

68. Harveys Tavern,

in Salisbury court. There were 4 Hearths in 1664.

69. Heaven,

Old Palace yard, Westminster. Tavern by the south west end of Westminster Hall.

70. Hell,

Old Palace yard, Westminster. Small eating house on the corner of St Margarets lane, and fronting on New Palace yard.

71. Hercules Pillars,

Excellent tokens exist, including pictures for Ed Oldham (1657-1659) and another in 1666.

On the south side of Fleet street at #27, near St Dunstans Church. There were 5 Hearths in 1664 and 17 Hearths in 1666 when Edward Oldham is named. A mention in Pepys diary is for the 31st August 1668 : "Up, and to my office, there to set my journal for all the last week, and so by water to Westminster to the Exchequer, and thence to the Swan, and there drank and did baiser la fille there, and so to the New Exchange and paid for some things, and so to Hercules Pillars .."

72. Hoop (Golden Hoop),

Fish street hill. Taverns stands back east side of Fish street hill, just north of Thames street. After the Fire of London, it was rebuilt and Fish street hill was widened, with an additional entry from here. Kept by Richard Spire, who rebuilt it at a cost of £1200, with 13 Hearths in 1664.

There is a mention of the Horns in Pepys diary on the 21st September 1660 when he states : "I landed at the old Swan and went to the Hoop Tavern, and (by a former agreement) sent for Mr. Chaplin, who with Nicholas Osborne and one Daniel came to us and we drank off two or three quarts of wine, which was very good; the drawing of our wine causing a great quarrel in the house between the two drawers which should draw us the best, which caused a great deal of noise and falling out till the master parted them, and came up to us and did give us a large account of the liberty that he gives his servants, all alike, to draw what wine they will to please his customers; and we did eat above 200 walnuts."

73. Horn,

Fleet street. On north side just outside parish of St Dunstan.

74. Horseshoe,

near Navy office

75. Jacobs [Probably the Salutation,

Charing Cross. ]

76. Katherine Wheel,

Islington.

77. Kings Head,

Bow. [Token issued by John Hanscombe in 1666]

On the 18 August 1662, Pepys mentions : "Up very early, and up upon my house to see how work goes on, which do please me very well. So about seven o’clock took horse and rode to Bowe, and there staid at the King’s Head, and eat a breakfast of eggs till Mr. Deane of Woolwich came to me, and he and I rid into Waltham Forest ..."


78. Kings Head,

Chancery Lane. [Tavern on east side almost at junction with Fleet street, and connected to each by passages. Signboard is of Henry VIII. Kept by Thomas Kent in 1660, after 1666 by William Marte, vintner. It had 20 Hearths in 1666. ]

The diary of Pepys on the  2 April 1668 states : "Thence with Lord Brouncker and several of them to the King’s Head Taverne by Chancery Lane, and there did drink and eat and talk, and, above the rest, I did hear of Mr. Hooke and my Lord an account of the reason of concords and discords in musique, which they say is from the equality of vibrations; but I am not satisfied in it, but will at my leisure think of it more, and see how far that do go to explain it. So late at night home with Mr. Colwell, and parted, and I to the office"


79. Kings Head,

Charing Cross. Mentioned in Pepys diary at the following times :

20 June 1660 : "To my own house, meeting G. Vines, and drank with him at Charing Cross, now the King’s Head Tavern. With my wife to my father’s, where met with Swan,—[William Swan is called a fanatic and a very rogue in other parts of the Diary.]—an old hypocrite, and with him, his friend and my father, and my cozen Scott to the Bear Tavern. To my father’s and to bed."

23 July 1660 : "That done and my Lord gone from me, I went with Mr. Cooling and his brother, and Sam Hartlibb, little Jennings and some others to the King’s Head Tavern at Charing Cross, where after drinking I took boat and so home .."

27 October 1662 : "Thence to Westminster Hall, and there walked long with Mr. Creed, and then to the great half-a-crown ordinary, at the King’s Head, near Charing Cross, where we had a most excellent neat dinner and very high company, and in a noble manner. After dinner he and I into another room over a pot of ale and talked. "

12 January 1662-63 : "Thence to my Lord’s lodgings, and with Mr. Creed to the King’s Head ordinary, but people being set down, we went to two or three places; at last found some meat at a Welch cook’s at Charing Cross, and here dined and our boys."

25 January 1662-63 (Lords Day) : "I walked towards White Hall, calling upon Mr. Moore, whom I found still very ill of his ague. I discoursed with him about my Lord’s estate against I speak with my Lord this day. Thence to the King’s Head ordinary at Charing Cross, and sent for Mr. Creed, where we dined very finely and good company, good discourse."

8 February 1662-63 (Lords Day) : " Thence with Mr. Creed to the King’s Head ordinary, where we dined well, and after dinner Sir Thomas Willis and another stranger, and Creed and I, fell a-talking; .."

26 February 1662-63 : "Thence to my Lord’s, who, I hear, has his ague again, for which I am sorry, and Creed and I to the King’s Head ordinary, where much good company."

10 May 1663 (Lords Day) : " Parted with him there, and I walked back to St. James’s, and was there at mass, and was forced in the crowd to kneel down; and mass being done, to the King’s Head ordinary, whither I sent for Mr. Creed and there we dined, .."

24 June 1663 : "Thence with Mr. Creed up and down to an ordinary, and, the King’s Head being full, went to the other over against it, a pretty man that keeps it, and good and much meat, better than the other, but the company and room so small that he must break, and there wants the pleasure that the other house has in its company."

4 July 1663 : "Thence with Creed to the King’s Head ordinary; but, coming late, dined at the second table very well for 12d.; "

23 October 1663 : "Thence walked to the King’s Head at Charing Cross and there dined, and hear that the Queen slept pretty well last night, but her fever continues upon her still."

26 October 1663 : "Thence Creed and I to the King’s Head ordinary, where much and very good company, among others one very talking man, but a scholler, that would needs put in his discourse and philosophy upon every occasion, and though he did well enough, yet his readiness to speak spoilt all."

9 November 1663 : "Having thus talked with him, there comes into the Hall Creed and Ned Pickering, and after a turne or two with them, it being noon, I walked with them two to the King’s Head ordinary, and there we dined; .."

22 November 1663 : (Lords Day) "Here I met Mr. Povy, who tells me how Tangier had like to have been betrayed, and that one of the King’s officers is come, to whom 8,000 pieces of eight were offered for his part. Hence I to the King’s Head ordinary, and there dined, good and much company, and a good dinner: most of their discourse was about hunting, in a dialect I understand very little. "

7 December 1663 : "By and by, not hoping to see my Lord, I went to the King’s Head ordinary, where a good dinner but no discourse almost, and after dinner by coach, home"

14 December 1663 : "Thence to the King’s Head ordinary, and there dined among a company of fine gentlemen; .."

28 December 1663 : "Thence to the King’s Head ordinary and there dined, and found Creed there, but we met and dined and parted without any thing more than “How do you?"

26 June 1665 : "Thence with Creed to the King’s Head, and there dined with him at the ordinary, and good sport with one Mr. Nicholls, a prating coxcombe, that would be thought a poet, but would not be got to repeat any of his verses. Thence I home .."


80. Kings Head,

Fish Street Hill. [Old Tavern on east side, north of Thames street, and a back entrance into Pudding lane. Kept by Thomas or Robert Craddock. It had 14 Hearths in 1666. ]

Pepys visited on the 29 October 1664 : "At dinner at home. In the afternoon to the office again, and about 9 o’clock by appointment to the King’s Head tavern upon Fish Street Hill, whither Mr. Wolfe (and Parham by his means) met me to discourse about the Fishery, and great light I had by Parham, who is a little conceited, but a very knowing man in his way, and in the general fishing trade of England."

 [William Croune, or Croone, of Emanuel College, Cambridge, died October 12th, 1684, and was interred at St. Mildred’s in the Poultry. In accordance with his wishes his widow, Mary, and daughter of Alderman John Lorymer  (who married Sir Edwin Sadleir, Bart.) left by will one-fifth of the clear rent of the King’s Head tavern in or near Old Fish Street, at the corner of Lambeth Hill, to the Royal Society - she founded the Croonian lecture at the College of Physicians. .. a footnote in Pepys diary]

81. Kings Head,

Lambeth.

82. Kings Head,

Lambeth Marsh.

Pepys writes on the 5 August 1663 : "So to the Exchange, and thence home to dinner with my brother, and in the afternoon to Westminster hall, and there found Mrs. Lane, and by and by by agreement we met at the Parliament stairs (in my way down to the boat who should meet us but my lady Jemimah, who saw me lead her but said nothing to me of her, though I ought to speak to her to see whether she would take notice of it or no) and off to Stangate and so to the King’s Head at Lambeth marsh, and had variety of meats and drinks, but I did so towse her and handled her, but could get nothing more from her though I was very near it; but as wanton and bucksome as she is she dares not adventure upon the business, in which I very much commend and like her."

83. Kings Head,

near Royal Exchange.

Pepys writes on the 17th November 1663 : " and at noon I to the ‘Change where Mr. Moore came to me, and by and by Tom Trice and my uncle Wight, and so we out to a taverne (the New Exchange taverne over against the ‘Change where I never was before, and I found my old playfellow Ben Stanley master of it), and thence to a scrivener to draw up a bond, and to another tavern (the King’s Head) we went, and calling on my cozen Angier at the India House there we eat a bit of pork from a cookes together, and after dinner did seal the bond, .."

84. Kings Head,

Tower street. [Ordinary on south side of tracebale 1648 - 1666. Kept by Thomas Mills in 1666 with 10 Hearths. ]

On the 25 April 1661, Pepys writes : "At noon Mr. Moore and I went to an Ordinary at the King’s Head in Towre Street, and there had a dirty dinner. Afterwards home and having done some business with him, in comes Mr. Sheply and Pierce the surgeon, and they and I to the Mitre and there staid a while and drank, and so home and after a little reading to bed."

##. Kings Head,

Islington

Pepys on the 27 March 1664 (Lords day) : "Thence walked through the ducking-pond fields; but they are so altered since my father used to carry us to Islington, to the old man’s, at the King’s Head, to eat cakes and ale (his name was Pitts) that I did not know which was the ducking-pond nor where I was. So through F[l]ee[t] lane to my father’s, .."

And again on the 25 April 1664 : " Thence to Islington, and so to St. John’s to the Red Bull, and there: saw the latter part of a rude prize fought, but with good pleasure enough; and thence back to Islington, and at the King’s Head, where Pitts lived, we ‘light and eat and drunk for remembrance of the old house sake, and so through Kingsland again, and so to Bishopsgate, and so home with great pleasure."


##. Kings Head,

Greenwich

27 September 1665 : " So by water to Greenwich, where with Creed and Lord Rutherford, and there my Lord told me that he would give me L100 for my pains, which pleased me well, though Creed, like a cunning rogue, hath got a promise of half of it from me. We to the King’s Head, the great musique house, the first time I was ever there, and had a good breakfast, and thence parted, .."

3 October 1665 : "While I dressed myself, and afterwards in walking to Greenwich we did discourse over all the business of the prize goods, and he puts me in hopes I may get some money in what I have done, but not so much as I expected, but that I may hereafter do more. We have laid a design of getting more, and are to talk again of it a few days hence. To the office, where nobody to meet me, Sir W. Batten being the only man and he gone this day to meet to adjourne the Parliament to Oxford. Anon by appointment comes one to tell me my Lord Rutherford is come; so I to the King’s Head to him, where I find his lady, a fine young Scotch lady, pretty handsome and plain. My wife also, and Mercer, by and by comes, Creed bringing them; and so presently to dinner and very merry; and after to even our accounts, and I to give him tallys, where he do allow me L100, of which to my grief the rogue Creed has trepanned me out of L50. But I do foresee a way how it may be I may get a greater sum of my Lord to his content by getting him allowance of interest upon his tallys. That being done, and some musique and other diversions, at last away goes my Lord and Lady, and I sent my wife to visit Mrs. Pierce, and so I to my office, where wrote important letters to the Court, and at night (Creed having clownishly left my wife), I to Mrs. Pierces and brought her and Mrs. Pierce to the King’s Head and there spent a piece upon a supper for her and mighty merry and pretty discourse, she being as pretty as ever, most of our mirth being upon “my Cozen” (meaning my Lord Bruncker’s ugly mistress, whom he calls cozen), and to my trouble she tells me that the fine Mrs. Middleton is noted for carrying about her body a continued sour base smell, that is very offensive, especially if she be a little hot. Here some bad musique to close the night and so away and all of us saw Mrs. Belle Pierce (as pretty as ever she was almost) home, and so walked to Will’s lodging where I used to lie, and there made shift for a bed for Mercer, and mighty pleasantly to bed. This night I hear that of our two watermen that use to carry our letters, and were well on Saturday last, one is dead, and the other dying sick of the plague. The plague, though decreasing elsewhere, yet being greater about the Tower and thereabouts."

20 December 1665 : "I was called by my Lord Bruncker in his coach with his mistresse, and Mr. Cottle the lawyer, our acquaintance at Greenwich, and so home to Greenwich, and thence I to Mrs. Penington, and had a supper from the King’s Head .. "

2 June 1666 : "Having set all things in order against the next flood, I went on shore with Captain Erwin at Greenwich, and into the Parke, and there we could hear the guns from the fleete most plainly. Thence he and I to the King’s Head and there bespoke a dish of steaks for our dinner about four o’clock. While that was doing, we walked to the water-side, and there seeing the King and Duke come down in their barge to Greenwich-house, I to them, and did give them an account [of] what I was doing."

## Kings Head,

Deptford

Pepys visits on the 9 November 1665 : "At noon by water, to the King’s Head at Deptford, where Captain Taylor invites Sir W: Batten, Sir John Robinson ."

And again on the 15 November 1665 : "Up and all the morning at the office, busy, and at noon to the King’s Head taverne, where all the Trinity House dined to-day, to choose a new Master in the room of Hurlestone, that is dead, and Captain Crispe is chosen."

## Kings Head,

Epsom

Pepys on the 14 July 1667 : "We got to Epsum by eight o’clock, to the well; where much company, and there we ‘light, and I drank the water: they did not, but do go about and walk a little among the women, but I did drink four pints, and had some very good stools by it. Here I met with divers of our town, among others with several of the tradesmen of our office, but did talk but little with them, it growing hot in the sun, and so we took coach again and to the towne, to the King’s Head, where our coachman carried us, and there had an ill room for us to go into, but the best in the house that was not taken up. Here we called for drink, and bespoke dinner; and hear that my Lord Buckhurst and Nelly are lodged at the next house, and Sir Charles Sidly with them and keep a merry house."


85. Lambs,

"Mother Lams". On the 10th January 1659-60, Pepys in his diary, describes as such. "Thence Jenings and I into London ... , and coming back drank a pint of wine at the Star in Cheapside. So to Westminster, overtaking Captain Okeshott in his silk cloak, whose sword got hold of many people in walking. Thence to the Coffee-house, where were a great confluence of gentlemen; viz. Mr. Harrington, Poultny, chairman, Gold, Dr. Petty; &c., where admirable discourse till at night. Thence with Doling to Mother Lams, ..."

86. Leg,

King street, Westminster.. Tavern or eating house, on the west side between George yard and Boars Head yard; kept by Thomas Clerke. A visit is noted on the 2nd March 1659-60 by Pepys  -  "Then going home, I met with Mr. Eglin, Chetwind, and Thomas, who took me to the Leg [another tavern] in King’s street, where we had two brave dishes of meat, one of fish, a carp and some other fishes, as well done as ever I ate any. After that to the Swan tavern, where we drank a quart or two of wine, and so parted."

87. Leg,

New Palace Yard. A Tavern, from 1654.Pepys mentions this Leg in his Diary, on the April 6, 1661. A token B2052 also exists, of a Thomas Stone.

88. Leg,

Westminster.

89. Locketts ordinary

#

90. Mitre,

Cheapside. Tavern on north side, kept by Francis Prochin from 1659, vintner. 10 hearths in 1664. Not rebuilt after Great Fire, probably absorbed into the rebuilt Mercers Hall. Also see the token #311 in the Beaufoy collection.

91. Mitre,

Fleet street.. Tavern on south side, near Mitre court, later made famous by Dr Johnson. It had 16 hearths in 1664. Rebuilt after the Great Fire in 1666, and ceased to be a tavern by 1788. No 30 Fleet street was demolished in 1829 for the enlargement of Hoares Bank

92. Mitre,

Mitre Court, "Pagets".

93. Mitre,

The  Fenchurch street. - see Rawlinsons, i.e. Daniel Rawlinson

94. Mitre,

Wood street. Destroyed in the Great Fire. Also see the tokens #1309 in the Beaufoy collection.

95. Nags Head

"and by coach to Paul’s School, where I heard some good speeches of the boys that were to be elected this year. Thence by and by with Mr. Pullen and Barnes (a great Non-Conformist) with several others of my old acquaintance to the Nag’s Head Taverne, and there did give them a bottle of sacke, and away again and I to the School, ..." - Pepys 4th February 1663-64
Token B582 in Cheapside is for Humphrey Grosvenor, a horse's head farthing. Token B602 is for Mary Woodfall, specifically at the Nags Head, a farthing.

96. New Exchange tavern

Pepys writes on the 17th November 1663 : " and at noon I to the ‘Change where Mr. Moore came to me, and by and by Tom Trice and my uncle Wight, and so we out to a taverne (the New Exchange taverne over against the ‘Change where I never was before, and I found my old playfellow Ben Stanley master of it), and thence to a scrivener to draw up a bond, and to another tavern (the King’s Head) we went, and calling on my cozen Angier at the India House there we eat a bit of pork from a cookes together, and after dinner did seal the bond, .."

There is an actual token B2276 for the Exchange Tavern, in the Poultry; describing it as the Exchange tavern, right against the Stocks, betwixt the Poultry and Cornhill ..

97. Old James,

Bishopsgate street.

98. Old Swan,

Fish street hill, [On west side, just above Upper Thames street, by Old Swan lane. Kept by Gilbert Brandon, vintner, 1646-1662; then by Cornelius Cage, vintner, then in 1665 by Benjamin Rushton, haberdasher. It was rebuilt after the fire, with 14 Hearths in 1666. ] Pepys’ Diary, lists it on May 13, 1668. See #1136 at Thames street

There is a mention of the Horns in Pepys diary on the 21st September 1660 when he states : "I landed at the old Swan and went to the Hoop Tavern, and (by a former agreement) sent for Mr. Chaplin, who with Nicholas Osborne and one Daniel came to us and we drank off two or three quarts of wine, which was very good; the drawing of our wine causing a great quarrel in the house between the two drawers which should draw us the best, which caused a great deal of noise and falling out till the master parted them, and came up to us and did give us a large account of the liberty that he gives his servants, all alike, to draw what wine they will to please his customers; and we did eat above 200 walnuts."

And in 15th November 1660 : "So I carried it to the Exchequer, where at Will’s I found Mr. Spicer, and so lodged it at his office with the rest. From thence after a pot of ale at Will’s I took boat in the dark and went for all that to the old Swan, and so to Sir Wm. Batten’s, and leaving some of the gallants at cards I went home.."

And the 9th December 1660 : "Twenty men drowned. Sir Williams both went by barge thither to see how things are, and I am sent to the Duke of York to tell him, and by boat with some other company going to Whitehall from the Old Swan. "

And on 25th March 1660-61 : "I took him (Mr Salisbury) to Whitehall with me by water, but he would not by any means be moved to go through bridge, and so we were fain to go round by the Old Swan."

On the 24th March 1661-62 : "So home again, and took water with them towards Westminster; but as we put off with the boat Griffin came after me to tell me that Sir G. Carteret and the rest were at the office, so I intended to see them through the bridge and come back again, but the tide being against us, when we were almost through we were carried back again with much danger, and Mrs. Pierce was much afeard and frightened. So I carried them to the other side and walked to the Beare, and sent them away, and so back again myself to the office, but finding nobody there I went again to the Old Swan, and thence by water to the New Exchange .."

The 23rd August 1662 : "Here we broke off, and I bid him good night, and so with much ado, the streets being at nine o’clock at night crammed with people going home to the city, for all the borders of the river had been full of people, as the King had come, to a miracle got to the Palace Yard, and there took boat, and so to the Old Swan, and so walked home, and to bed very weary."

First part of the 8th September 1662 : "About 7 o’clock I went forth thinking to go along with Sir John Minnes and the rest, and I found them gone, which did vex me, so I went directly to the old Swan and took boat before them to Sir G. Carteret’s lodgings at Whitehall "

And later on the 8th September 1662 : "The rest to Deptford, I to the Exchequer to meet Mr. Townsend, where I hear he is gone to the Sun tavern, and there found him with some friends at breakfast, which I eat with him, and so we crossed the water together, and in walking I told him my brother Tom’s intentions for a wife, which he would do me all favour in to Mr. Young, whose kinswoman he do look after. We took boat again at the Falcon, and there parted, and I to the old Swan, and so to the Change, and there meeting Sir W. Warren did step to a tavern, and there sat and talked about price of masts and other things, and so broke up and to my office to see what business, and so we took water again, and at the Tower I over to Redriffe, .."

The 3rd April 1663 : "Waked betimes and talked half an hour with my father, and so I rose and to my office, and about 9 o’clock by water from the Old Swan to White Hall .."

And on the 4th August 1663 : "I took boat with Jervas and his wife and set them at Westminster, and it being late forbore Mrs. Lane and went by water to the Old Swan by a boat .."

Two years on, in the 11th July 1665 : " And so all night down by water, a most pleasant passage, and come thither by two o’clock, and so walked from the Old Swan home, and there to bed"

28th November 1665 : "So to Fox-Hall and there took boat, and down to the Old Swan, and thence to Lumbard Streete, it being darke night, and thence to the Tower. "

16th December 1665 "So I parted from him and walked to Westminster Hall, where Sir W. Warren, who come along with me, staid for me, and there I did see Betty Howlet come after the sicknesse to the Hall. Had not opportunity to salute her, as I desired, but was glad to see her and a very pretty wench she is. Thence back, landing at the Old Swan and taking boat again at Billingsgate, and setting ashore we home .."

18th March 1665-66 : "She tells me as a secret that Betty Howlet of the Hall, my little sweetheart, that I used to call my second wife, is married to a younger son of Mr. Michell’s (his elder brother, who should have had her, being dead this plague), at which I am glad, and that they are to live nearer me in Thames Streete, by the Old Swan."

8th April 1666 : (Lords Day) "to White Hall, it raining, and no coach to be had. So I walked to the Old Swan, and there got a scull."

1st May 1666 : "I out also to and fro, to see and be seen, among others to find out in Thames Streete where Betty Howlett is come to live, being married to Mrs. Michell’s son; which I did about the Old Swan, but did not think fit to go thither or see them."

9th June 1666 : "Thence homewards, landed at the Old Swan, and there find my pretty Betty Michell and her husband at their doore in Thames Streete .."

10th June 1666 : "Having talked thus much with Sir G. Carteret we parted there, and I home by water, taking in my boat with me young Michell and my Betty his wife, meeting them accidentally going to look a boat. I set them down at the Old Swan and myself, went through bridge to the Tower, and so home, and after supper to bed."

6th July 1666 : "Thence down to the Old Swan, calling at Michell’s, he not being within, and there I did steal a kiss or two of her, and staying a little longer, he come in, and her father, whom I carried to Westminster .."

27th July 1666 : "I away by water from the Old Swan to White Hall."

31st July 1666 : "At the Old Swan found my Betty Michell at the doore, where I staid talking with her a pretty while, it being dusky, and kissed her and so away home and writ my letters, and then home .."

5th August 1666 (Lords Day) : "Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there called Betty Michell and her husband, and had two or three a long salutes from her out of sight of ‘su mari’, which pleased me mightily, and so carried them by water to West minster .."

5th August 1666 (Lords Day) : and also "we did also land and eat and drink at Wandsworth, and so to the Old Swan, and thence walked home."

14th August 1666 (Thanksgiving Day) : "Then I abroad down to the Old Swan, and there I called and kissed Betty Michell, and would have got her to go with me to Westminster .."

20th August 1666 : "Walked back, and so home, and then down to the Old Swan and drank at Betty Michell’s"

1st September 1666 : "So I down to the water-side, and there got a boat and through bridge, and there saw a lamentable fire. Poor Michell’s house, as far as the Old Swan, already burned that way, and the fire running further ..."

24th October 1666 : " Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there find little Michell come to his new shop that he hath built there in the room of his house that was burned. I hope he will do good here. I drank and bade him joy, for I love him and his wife well, him for his care, and her for her person"

1st December 1666 : "At home to dinner, and then abroad walking to the Old Swan, and in my way I did see a cellar in Tower Streete in a very fresh fire .."

13th January 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "walked to the Old Swan, thinking to have got a boat to White Hall, but could not, nor was there anybody at home at Michell’s, where I thought to have sat with her.... So home..."

20th January 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "Up betimes and down to the Old Swan, there called on Michell and his wife, which in her night linen appeared as pretty almost as ever to my thinking I saw woman. Here I drank some burnt brandy. They shewed me their house, which, poor people, they have built, and is very pretty."

27th January 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "I down to the Old Swan, and there to Michell and staid while he and she dressed themselves, and here had a ‘baiser’ or two of her, whom I love mightily; and then took them in a sculler (being by some means or other disappointed of my own boat) to White Hall, and so with them to Westminster .."

28th January 1666-67 : "Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there drank at Michell’s and saw Betty, and so took boat and to the Temple" and "A little before noon I went to the Swan and eat a bit of meat, thinking I should have had occasion to have stayed long at the house, but I did not .."

1st February 1666-67 : "Thence by water to Billingsgate; thence to the Old Swan, and there took boat, it being now night, to Westminster Hall .."

17th February 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "Then he and I parted, and I to Westminster to the Swan, and there staid till Michell and his wife come. Old Michell and his wife come to see me, and there we drank"

3rd March 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "and then home, and there find little Michell and his wife, whom I love mightily. Mightily contented I was in their company, for I love her much; and so after dinner I left them and by water from the Old Swan to White Hall.."

8th March 1666-67 : " Up, and to the Old Swan, where drank at Michell’s, but not seeing her whom I love I by water to White Hall" and "So to the Swan, and there had three or four baisers of the little ancilla there, and so to Westminster Hall, where I saw Mr. Martin .."

20th March 1666-67 : "and to the Old Swan, and there drank at Michell’s, but his wife is not there, but gone to her mother’s, who is ill, and so hath staid there since Sunday. Thence to Westminster Hall and drank at the Swan, and ‘baiserais the petite misse’; and so to Mrs. Martin’s .."

5th April 1667 : "and then down to the Old Swan, and drank with Betty and her husband, but no opportunity para baiser la."

9th April 1667 : " and therefore away to Westminster to the Swan, and there did baiser la little missa.... and drank, and then by water to the Old Swan, and there found Betty Michell sitting at the door .."

10th April 1667 : "So away by water from the Old Swan to White Hall".

22nd April 1667 : "So walked to the Old Swan and drank at Michell’s, and then to White Hall"

24th April 1667 : "Thence by water at 10 at night from Westminster Bridge, having kissed little Frank, and so to the Old Swan, and walked home by moonshine .."

20th May 1667 : " Thence down to the Old Swan, and there saw Betty Michell, whom I have not seen since her christening."

26th May 1667 : "and so landed at the Old Swan, and so home .."

28th May 1667 : "So by water, set Creed down at White Hall, and I to the Old Swan, and so home."

2nd June 1667 : "I took boat at the Old Swan, and there up the river all alone as high as Putney almost, and then back again."

3rd June 1667 : "and I to the Old Swan, and thence home."

6th July 1667 : "After dinner away, leaving Creed there, by coach to Westminster, where to the Swan and drank, and then to the Hall, and there talked a little with great joy of the peace, and then to Mrs. Martin’s .."

25th August 1667 : "After dinner, away by water to White Hall, where I landed Pelling, who is going to his wife, where she is in the country, at Parson’s Greene: and myself to Westminster, and there at the Swan I did baiser Frank, and to the parish church, thinking to see Betty Michell .."

1st September 1667 : "Up, and betimes by water from the Tower, and called at the Old Swan for a glass of strong water, and sent word to have little Michell and his wife come and dine with us to-day. "

17th September 1667 : "In the afternoon walked to the Old Swan, the way mighty dirty, and there called at Michell’s .."

23rd September 1667 : "Up, and walked to the Exchange, there to get a coach but failed, and so was forced to walk a most dirty walk to the Old Swan, and there took boat, and so to the Exchange, and there took coach to St. James’s .."

13th November 1667 : "Up, and down to the Old Swan, and so to Westminster;"

24th November 1667 : "But it being not begun I to Westminster Hall, and there staid and walked, and then to the Swan, and there drank and talked, and did banter a little Frank, and so to White Hall, .."

18th February 1667-68 : "Up by break of day, and walked down to the old Swan, where I find little Michell building, his booth being taken down, and a foundation laid for a new house, so that that street is like to be a very fine place. I drank, but did not see Betty, and so to Charing Cross stairs .."

5th March 1667-68 : "So with great trouble, but yet with some ease, from this discourse with my wife, I up, and to my Office, whither come my clerks, and so I did huddle the best I could some more notes for my discourse to-day, and by nine o’clock was ready, and did go down to the Old Swan, and there by boat, with T. H[ater] and W. H[ewer] with me, to Westminster ..2

13th March 1667-68 : "Thence walked to the Old Swan and drank at Michell’s, whose house is going up apace. Here I saw Betty, but could not baiser la, and so to Westminster, there to the Hall ..2

19th March 1667-68 : "Up, and betimes to the Old Swan, and by water to White Hall, and thence to W. Coventry’s, where stayed but a little to talk with him, and thence by water back again, it being a mighty fine, clear spring morning. Back to the Old Swan, and drank at Michell’s, whose house goes up apace, but I could not see Betty, and thence walked all along Thames Street, which I have not done since it was burned, as far as Billingsgate .."

27th March 1667-68 : "Thence to walk a little in Westminster Hall, where the Parliament I find sitting, but spoke with nobody to let me know what they are doing, nor did I enquire. Thence to the Swan and drank, and did baiser Frank, and so down by water back again, and to the Exchange .."

24th April 1668 : "After dinner down to the Old Swan, and by the way called at Michell’s, and there did see Betty, and that was all .."

1st May 1668 : "Thence by water, not being able to get a coach, nor boat but a sculler, and that with company, is being so foul a day, to the Old Swan, and so home .."

5th May 1668 : "Thence to walk in the Hall, and there hear that Mrs. Martin’s child, my god-daughter, is dead, and so by water to the Old Swan, and thence home .."

13th May 1668 : "So thence, after Council, having drunk some of the King’s wine and water with Mr. Chevins, my Lord Brouncker, and some others, I by water to the Old Swan, and there to Michell’s, and did see her and drink there .."

28th May 1668 : "to the Old Swan, and walked with them home .."

27th September 1668 : "I home in the dark about eight at night, and so over the ruins from the Old Swan home with great trouble .."



99. Penells,

Fleet street. [Robert Penells Tavern in Fleet street, with 10 Hearths in 1666.]

100. Plough,

Plough, Fleet street. - Pepys 29th February 1659 - 60

101. Popes Head,

Chancery Lane. [Large Tavern, back from North side of Fleet street and west side of Chancery lane, by Bell yard. It has 22 Hearths in 1666. ] It is often described as in the Change by Pepys

Tokens #299 and #300 note this Popes Head, with Henry Redman being there after the fire, in 1666.

"After that I went forth about my own business to buy a pair of riding grey serge stockings and sword and belt and hose, and after that took Wotton and Brigden to the Pope’s Head Tavern in Chancery Lane, where Gilb. Holland and Shelston were, and we dined and drank a great deal of wine, and they paid all." - Pepys 22nd March 1659-60.

"At noon to the ‘Change, and from the ‘Change over with Alsopp and the others to the Pope’s Head tavern, and there staid a quarter of an hour, .." Pepys 14th July 1664
"That done I to the ‘Change, and among many other things, especially for getting of my Tangier money, I by appointment met Mr. Gawden, and he and I to the Pope’s Head Taverne, and there he did give me alone a very pretty dinner. "  Pepys 8th December 1665

" Thence away to the Pope’s Head Taverne, and there met first with Captain Cocke, and dispatched my business with him to my content, he being ready to sign his bill of imprest of L2,000, and gives it me in part of his payment to me, which glads my heart." - Pepys 13th December 1665

"and so at noon I to London, but the ‘Change was done before I got thither, so I to the Pope’s Head Taverne, and there find Mr. Gawden and Captain Beckford and Nick Osborne going to dinner, and I dined with them and very exceeding merry we were .." Pepys 14th December 1665

"Thence back and took up my wife at the ‘Change, and so home. This day at noon I went with my young gentlemen (thereby to get a little time while W. Hewer went home to bid them get a dinner ready) to the Pope’s Head tavern, there to see the fine painted room which Rogerson told me of, of his doing; but I do not like it at all, though it be good for such a publick room." - Pepys 18th February 1668-69

102. Popes Head,

Popes Head Alley. [Large Tavern off of Lombard street, having an upper story and cellars. Kept between 1660 - 1674 by John Sawyer. Destroyed in Great Fire, moved to temporary premises in St Helens, before returning. It had  20 Hearths in 1664, and 25 Hearths in 1675. ]

Pepys visits here - "So with my Lord to the Pope’s Head Taverne in Lumbard Streete to dine by appointment with Captain Taylor, whither Sir W. Coventry come to us .." on the 26th March 1666.

On the 18th November 1666, Pepys states "At noon with Lord Bruncker to St. Ellen’s, where the master of the late Pope’s Head Taverne is now set up again, and there dined at Sir W. Warren’s cost, a very good dinner." - probably in St Helens?.



103. Prices,

"From thence with Tom Doling and Boston and D. Vines (whom we met by the way) to Price’s, and there we drank,.." Pepys 16th December 1660
Old Palace Yard.

104. Quakers

"To White Hall, where my Lord and the principal officers met, and had a great discourse about raising of money for the Navy, which is in very sad condition, and money must be raised for it. Mr. Blackburne, Dr. Clerke, and I to the Quaker’s and dined there." - Pepys 31st July 1660

"Thence to Commissioners of Accounts and there examined, and so back to Westminster Hall, where all the talk of committing all to the Tower, and Creed and I to the Quaker’s, dined together" - Pepys 14th April 1668

"and thence to Westminster Hall, where all cry out that the House will be severe with Pen; but do hope well concerning the buyers, that we shall have no difficulty, which God grant! Here met Creed, and, about noon, he and I, and Sir P. Neale to the Quaker’s, and there dined with a silly Executor of Bishop Juxon’s, and cozen Roger Pepys. "- Pepys 15th April 1668

105. Red Lion (Red Lyon),

In Aldersgate street. [Small coaching inn, on west side, just north of Long lane, Barbican. Kept by Thomas Newberry, with 14 Hearths in 1666. ]

On the 13th October 1664 : "I by coach to the Red Lyon in Aldersgate Street, and there, by agreement, met W. Joyce and Tom Trice, and mounted, I upon a very fine mare that Sir W. Warren helps me to, and so very merrily rode till it was very darke, I leading the way through the darke to Welling, and there, not being very weary, to supper and to bed. But very bad accommodation at the Swan."
[Swan, in Welling ?]


106. Red Lion (Red Lyon),

King street.

###.

## Red Lion (Red Lyon),

Barnet hill, on the Great North road and a locality known as Underhill. One of the many coaching inns. Known as the Lower Red Lion, and demolished in 2016!

107. Reindeer, The

"From thence at 2 to my Lord’s, where we took Mr. Sheply and Wm. Howe to the Raindeer, and had some oysters .." - pepys 4th october 1660

108. Rhenish winehouse,

King street, Westminster. There is a token B1602, in 1668 which possibly refers to this; and in 1663 described as about the middle of King street.

Pepys is here on the 30th July 1660, when he notes "To Westminster and among other things met with Mr. Moore, and took him and his friend, a bookseller of Paul’s Churchyard, to the Rhenish Winehouse, and drinking there ..".

"After dinner Sir W. Batten, Pen, and myself by coach to Westminster Hall, where we met Mr. Wayte the lawyer to the Treasurer, and so we went up to the Committee of Parliament, which are to consider of the debts of the Army and Navy, and did give in our account of the twenty-five ships. Col. Birch was very impertinent and troublesome. But at last we did agree to fit the accounts of our ships more perfectly for their view within a few days, that they might see what a trouble it is to do what they desire. From thence Sir Williams both going by water home, I took Mr. Wayte to the Rhenish winehouse, and drank with him and so parted." - Pepys here again on the 18th September 1660

"To my Lord’s, where after I had done talking with him Mr. Townsend, Rumball, Blackburn, Creed and Shepley and I to the Rhenish winehouse, and there I did give them two quarts of Wormwood wine, and so we broke up. So we parted, and I and Mr. Creed to Westminster Hall" - Pepys here on the 24th November 1660


109. Rhenish winehouse,

Priors, Cannon Row, Westminster. There are two references in Pepys diary. Cannon row also appears to be named Channel row in 1750, then latterly Cannon row.

On the 3rd February 1659-60 we have "Thence with my cozen Roger Pepys, it being term time, we took him out of the Hall to Priors, the Rhenish wine-house, and there had a pint or two of wine and a dish of anchovies, and bespoke three or four dozen bottles of wine for him against his wedding."

[Roger Pepys, son of Talbot Pepys of Impington, a barrister of the Middle Temple, M.P. for Cambridge, 1661-78, and Recorder of that town, 1660-88. He married, for the third time, Parnell, daughter and heiress of John Duke, of Workingham, co. Suffolk, and this was the wedding.]

"To the Parish church in the morning, where a good sermon by Mr. Mills. After dinner to my Lord’s, and from thence to the Abbey, where I met Spicer and D. Vines and others of the old crew. So leaving my boy at the Abbey against I came back, we went to Prior’s by the Hall back door, but there being no drink to be had we went away, and so to the Crown in the Palace Yard" Pepys, on the 21st October 1660 (Lords day, i.e. a Sunday, and clearly not serving then)

110. Rhenish winehouse,

At the Steelyard. Pepys references this on the 2nd May 1665. "and by and by Sir W. Batten and my Lady and my wife and I by appointment yesterday (my Lady Pen failed us, who ought to have been with us) to the Rhenish winehouse at the Steelyard, and there eat a couple of lobsters and some prawns, and pretty merry, especially to see us four together, while my wife and my Lady did never intend ever to be together again after a year’s distance between one another."

111. Ringo

On the 18th October 1661, we have Pepys mention that "At the office all the morning, and dined at home, and so to Paul’s Churchyard ... Hither I sent for Captain Ferrers to me, who comes with a friend of his, and they and I to the Theatre, and there saw “Argalus and Parthenia,” where a woman acted Parthenia, and came afterwards on the stage in men’s clothes, and had the best legs that ever I saw, and I was very well pleased with it. Thence to the Ringo alehouse, and thither sent for a belt-maker, and bought of him a handsome belt for second mourning, which cost me 24s., and is very neat."

 

112. Rose,

King street.

113. Rose Tavern,

Russell street, Covent Garden. [Tavern in Russell street on east corner of Bridges street (now Catherine street). It is adjacent to the theatre in Drury lane, kept by the Long family and had 19 Hearths in 1666. ] Token B740 notes that this was run by William Long until his death in 1666, and then by his widow Mary Long.

Search on 'the rose' gives 25 entries 'the Rose Tavern' gives 10.

On 26th February 1660, he mentions the Rose tavern three times. On the 15th July, he appears to be visiting that in Cambridge.

On the 7th November 1666 - "Thence to Westminster Hall, and, it being fast day, there was no shops open, but meeting with Doll Lane, did go with her to the Rose taverne, and there drank and played with her a good while."; and on the 2nd January 1666-67, we have "So down to the Hall and to the Rose Taverne, while Doll Lane come to me, and we did ‘biber a good deal de vino,..".

"and so took my coach, which waited, and away through Covent Garden, to set down two gentlemen and a lady, who come thither to see also, and did make mighty mirth in their talk of the folly of this religion. And so I stopped, having set them down and drank some burnt wine at the Rose Tavern door, while the constables come, and two or three Bellmen went by,. ." on the 24th December 1667.

On the 9th May 1668, we have "Thence I to the Rose Taverne in Covent Garden, and there sent for a pullet and dined all alone, being to meet Sir W. Pen, who by and by come .."

114. Rose,

Tower street.

115. Royal Oak,

Lombard street. Pepys, on April 10, 1663, wrote that he ‘ to Royall Oake Taverne, in Lumbarde Streete  ; William Smith issues a token in 1766 for the Royal Oak, with three Crowns.

116. Salutation,

Billingsgate.

There is a token B201 which relates to the Salutation Tavern in Billingsgate.

On the 5th March 1659-60, Pepys mentions in his diary "Then to Westminster, where I met with Mr. Sheply and Mr. Pinkney at Will’s, who took me by water to Billingsgate, at the Salutation Tavern, whither by-and-by, Mr. Talbot and Adams came, and bring a great [deal of] good meat, a ham of bacon, &c. Here we staid and drank till Mr. Adams began to be overcome. Then we parted, and so to Westminster by water .."

117. Sampson,

Pauls Churchyard. Also see the tokens #2717 and 2718 in the Boynes and Beaufoy collection. []

On 24 August 1661, Pepys in his diary notes "But I took him (Capt Isham) to the Mitre and gave him a glass of sack, and so adieu, and then straight to the Opera, and there saw “Hamlet, Prince of Denmark,” done with scenes very well, but above all, Betterton did the prince’s part beyond imagination. Hence homeward, and met with Mr. Spong and took him to the Sampson in Paul’s churchyard, and there staid till late, and it rained hard, so we were fain to get home wet, and so to bed
"

118. Saracens Head.

Marked on Ogilbys map - 006-5. Sarazens Head Inn, Snow Hill, A93

119. Ship, Billiter Lane, Fenchurch street.

On the 8 April 1667, Pepys in his diary notes "Up, and having dressed myself, to the office a little, and out, expecting to have seen the pretty daughter of the Ship taverne at the hither end of Billiter Lane (whom I never yet have opportunity to speak to). I in there to drink my morning draught of half a pint of Rhenish wine; but a ma doleur elle and their family are going away thence, and a new man come to the house."

On the 20 July 1667 , "I find that the very pretty daughter at the Ship tavern, at the end of Billiter Lane, is there still, and in the bar: and, I believe, is married to him that is new come, and hath new trimmed the house."

On the 21 July 1667 , on Lords Day "Here Mercer tells me that the pretty maid of the Ship tavern I spoke of yesterday is married there, which I am glad of."

On the 20 September 1667 , " I to the office, where, having done my business, I out to pay some debts: among others to the taverne at the end of Billiter Lane, where my design was to see the pretty mistress of the house, which I did, and indeed is, as I always thought, one of the modestest, prettiest, plain women that ever I saw."

120. Ship,

Temple Bar. The Ship is noted in Temple Bar by a token farthing B3066 of year 1649

121. Ship,

Threadneedle street. The Royal Exchange is between the southern side of Threadneedle street; and northern side of Cornhill.

A token #1157 exists which ties in nicely with this description, i.e. the Antwerp Tavern, Noticed as " the Ship at the Exchange," among well-known taverns, particularized in Newesfrom, Bartholomew Fayre.

Pepys, in his diary, on 30 August 1661 refers to "At noon Mr. Coventry and I by his coach to the Exchange together; and in Lumbard-street met Captain Browne of the Rosebush: at which he was cruel angry: and did threaten to go to-day to the Duke at Hampton Court, and get him turned out because he was not sailed. But at the Exchange we resolved of eating a bit together, which we did at the Ship behind the Exchange, and so took boat to Billingsgate"


122. Ship,

Westminster.

123. Shorts alehouse

#

124. Standings

#

125. Star "Ringsteads".

Cheapside.  On the 10th January 1659-60, Pepys in his diary, describes as such. "Thence Jenings and I into London ... , and coming back drank a pint of wine at the Star in Cheapside. So to Westminster, overtaking Captain Okeshott in his silk cloak, whose sword got hold of many people in walking. Thence to the Coffee-house, where were a great confluence of gentlemen; viz. Mr. Harrington, Poultny, chairman, Gold, Dr. Petty; &c., where admirable discourse till at night. Thence with Doling to Mother Lams, ..."
In 1st December, 1660, he notes that "Mr. Shepley and I went into London, and calling upon Mr. Pinkney, the goldsmith, he took us to the tavern, and gave us a pint of wine, and there fell into our company old Mr. Flower and another gentleman; who tell us how a Scotch knight was killed basely the other day at the Fleece in Covent Garden, where there had been a great many formerly killed. So to Paul’s Churchyard, and there I took the little man at Mr. Kirton’s and Mr. Shepley to Ringstead’s at the Star, and after a pint of wine I went home, my brains somewhat troubled with so much wine, and after a letter or two by the post I went to bed."

#

126. Sugar Loaf,

Fleet Street.

In Pepys tavern, the Sugar Loaf is always mentioned as being distinctly by, or near to,  Temple Bar, on both occasions.
On the 9 Feb 1659-60, "Thence Swan and I to a drinking-house near Temple Bar, where while he wrote I played on my flageolet till a dish of poached eggs was got ready for us, which we eat, and so by coach home." (Specifically referenced the following day).
On the 10 Feb 1659-60, before the fire Pepys notes "Thence I went and drank with Mr. Moore at the Sugar Loaf by Temple Bar, where Swan and I were last night, and so we parted. At home I found Mr. Hunt, who sat talking with me awhile, and so to bed."

In 1666, there are tokens, a farthing and two halfpennies attributed to the Three sugar loaves, without Temple Bar #3030, 3067 and 3068

On the 10th Mar 1668-69 "Up, and by hackney-coach to Auditor Beale’s Office, in Holborne, to look for records of the Navy, but he was out of the way, and so forced to go next to White Hall, to the Privy Seal; and, after staying a little there, then to Westminster, where, at the Exchequer, I met with Mr. Newport and Major Halsey; and, after doing a little business with Mr. Burges, we by water to White Hall, where I made a little stop: and so with them by coach to Temple Bar, where, at the Sugar Loaf we dined, and W. Hewer with me; and there comes a companion of theirs, Colonel Vernon, I think they called him; a merry good fellow .."

#

127. Sun,

Chancery Lane. Pepys mentions this Sun on the 20th January 1659-60, in his diary : "I called upon Mr. Calthrop about the money due to my Lord. Here I met with Mr. Woodfine and drank with him at the Sun in Chancery Lane and so to Westminster Hall, where at the lobby I spoke with the rest of my guests and so to my office. At noon went by water with Mr. Maylard and Hales to the Swan in Fish Street at our Goal Feast, .."

#

128. Sun,

Fish street Hill. A token B2015 exists of the Sun Tavern in 1657.

Pepys references this in his diary on 22 November 1661, when he says "At noon I went to the Sun tavern; on Fish Street hill, to a dinner of Captn. Teddimans, where was my Lord Inchiquin (who seems to be a very fine person), Sir W. Pen, Captn. Cuttance, and one Mr. Lawrence (a fine gentleman now going to Algiers), and other good company, where we had a very fine dinner, good musique, and a great deal of wine."

129. Sun,

King street. A Will Carter has a farthing token, #1620, at the Sun Tavern, King street. The initials E F W are on this token.

“Meeting Dr. Gibbons, carried him to the Sun taverne, in King Street, and there made him, and some friends of his, drink ; among others, Captain Silas Taylor.”—Pepys’ Diary , August 3, 1668.

130. Sun,

Threadneedle street. The Royal Exchange is between the southern side of Threadneedle street; and northern side of Cornhill.

A token #959 exists of the Sun Tavern, behind the Exchange - initials NAC and Pepys similarly describes this Sun Tavern on many occasions.

131. Swan

Swan, Dowgate. A token exists in Dowgate Hill of a Swan half penny token (B843) to William Burges, in 1668.

On 27th June 1660 : "Dined with my Lord and all the officers of his regiment, who invited my Lord and his friends, as many as he would bring, to dinner, at the Swan, at Dowgate, a poor house and ill dressed, but very good fish and plenty."


132. Swan,

King street.

On the 9th May 1661 : "which did so much rejoice me that I meeting with Mr. Childe took him to the Swan Tavern in King Street, and there did give him a tankard of white wine and sugar,.."

2nd October 1666 : "But coming to our rendezvous at the Swan Taverne, in King Streete, I find they have found the housekeeper, and the book simply locked up in the Court. So I staid and drank, and rewarded the doore-keeper .."



133. Swan

Swan, Leadenhall street.

On the 8th February 1666-67 : "At noon Lord Bruncker, Sir W. Batten, [Sir] W. Pen, and myself to the Swan in Leadenhall Street to dinner, where an exceedingly good dinner and good discourse."

134. Swan,

New Palace Yard. Run by Mrs Herbert in 1664, or see the later entries for Herberts girl in the following January etc.

On 8th February 1659-60 : "I was called on by Mr. Fossan, my fellow pupil at Cambridge, and I took him to the Swan in the Palace yard, and drank together our morning draft. Thence to my office, where I received money, and afterwards Mr. Carter, my old friend at Cambridge, meeting me as I was going out of my office I took him to the Swan,.."

And on the 25th November 1661 : "At noon, at the rising of the House, I met with Sir W. Pen and Major General Massy, who I find by discourse to be a very ingenious man, and among other things a great master in the secresys of powder and fireworks, and another knight to dinner, at the Swan, in the Palace yard, and our meat brought from the Legg .."

On the 20th April 1664 : "I went also out of the Hall with Mrs. Lane to the Swan at Mrs. Herbert’s in the Palace Yard to try a couple of bands, and did (though I had a mind to be playing the fool with her) purposely stay but a little while .. "

9th January 1664-65 : "Thence I to Westminster, to my barber’s, and found occasion to see Jane, but in presence of her mistress, and so could not speak to her of her failing me yesterday, and then to the Swan to Herbert’s girl, and lost time a little with her, and so took coach, and to my Lord Crew’s and dined with him .."

23rd March 1664-65 : "At noon to the ‘Change. Home, and Lewellin dined with me. Thence abroad, carried my wife to Westminster by coach, I to the Swan, Herbert’s, and there had much of the good company of Sarah and to my wish, and then to see Mrs. Martin, who was very kind, three weeks of her month of lying in is over."

15th May 1665 : "Thence to the Swan at Herbert’s, and there the company of Sarah a little while, and so away and called at the Harp and Ball, where the mayde, Mary, is very ‘formosa’—[handsome]—;"

29th May 1665 : "and so to the Swan, and there drank at Herbert’s, and so by coach home, it being kept a great holiday through the City, for the birth and restoration of the King."

31st January 1665-66 : "So after going to the Swan in the Palace, and sent for Spicer to discourse about my last Tangier tallys that have some of the words washed out with the rain, to have them new writ, I home .."

28th February 1665-66 (Ash Wednesday) : "Thence to the Palace Yard, to the Swan, and there staid till it was dark, and then to Mrs. Lane’s, .."

27th January 1666-67 (Lords Day) : "After walking up and down the Court with him, it being now dark and past six at night, I walked to the Swan in the Palace yard and there with much ado did get a waterman, and so I sent for the Michells, and they come, and their father Howlett and his wife with them, and there we drank, and so into the boat.."


135. Swan,

Old Fish street.

At #98 is also an Old Swan, in Fish street hill

On 20th January 1659-60 : "I called upon Mr. Calthrop about the money due to my Lord. Here I met with Mr. Woodfine and drank with him at the Sun in Chancery Lane and so to Westminster Hall, where at the lobby I spoke with the rest of my guests and so to my office. At noon went by water with Mr. Maylard and Hales to the Swan in Fish Street at our Goal Feast, .."

And the 15th August 1662 : "At noon to the Change, and there hear of some Quakers that are seized on, that would have blown up the prison in Southwark where they are put. So to the Swan, in Old Fish Street, where Mr. Brigden and his father-in-law, Blackbury, of whom we had bought timber in the office, but have not dealt well with us, did make me a fine dinner only to myself; "

136. Swan, Westminster.

On the 17th May 1665 : "Up, and by appointment to a meeting of Sir John Lawson and Mr. Cholmly’s atturney and Mr. Povy at the Swan taverne at Westminster to settle their business about my being secured in the payment of money to Sir J. Lawson in the other’s absence."

23rd March 1665-66 : "Thence I to Westminster, to the Chequer, about a little business, and then to the Swan, and there sent for a bit of meat and dined; and after dinner had opportunity of being pleased with Sarah; and so away to Westminster Hall, and there Mrs. Michell tells me with great joy how little Betty Howlett is married to her young son Michell, which is a pretty odd thing, that he should so soon succeed in the match to his elder brother that died of the plague, and to the house and trade intended for him, and more they say that the girle has heretofore said that she did love this little one more than the other brother that was intended her all along. I am mighty glad of this match, and more that they are likely to live near me in Thames Streete, where I may see Betty now and then, whom I from a girle did use to call my second wife, and mighty pretty she is."

15th April 1666 (Easter Day): "Up and by water to Westminster to the Swan to lay down my cloak, and there found Sarah alone, with whom after I had staid awhile I to White Hall Chapel .. "

18th April 1666 : "Thence to the Exchange, that is, the New Exchange, and looked over some play books and intend to get all the late new plays. So to Westminster, and there at the Swan got a bit of meat and dined alone; and so away toward King’s Street, .."

23rd April 1666 : "Dined at home and took Balty with me to Hales’s to show him his sister’s picture, and thence to Westminster, and there I to the Swan and drank, and so back again alone to Hales’s .. "

4th May 1666 : "After dinner abroad again and to the New Exchange about play books, and to White Hall, thinking to have met Sir G. Carteret, but failed. So to the Swan at Westminster, and there spent a quarter of an hour with Jane, and thence away home .."

13th May 1666 (Lords Day) : " I to and again up and down Westminster, thinking to have spent a little time with Sarah at the Swan, or Mrs. Martin, but was disappointed in both, so walked the greatest part of the way home .."

27th May 1666 (Lords Day) : "After dinner we broke up and I by water to Westminster to Mrs. Martin’s, and there sat with her and her husband and Mrs. Burrows, the pretty, an hour or two, then to the Swan a while, and so home by water .."

20th June 1666 : "Thence to the Hall and with Mrs. Martin home and staid with her a while, and then away to the Swan and sent for a bit of meat and dined there, and thence to Faythorne, the picture-seller’s .. "

11th July 1666 : "Thence to Westminster Hall and there staid a while, and then to the Swan and kissed Sarah, and so home to dinner .. "

1st August 1666 : "I to the Swan and there dined upon a rabbit, and after dinner to Mrs. Martin’s .."

12th October 1666 : "Thence home by coach, mighty dirty weather, and then to the Treasurer’s office and got a ticket paid for my little Michell, and so again by coach to Westminster, and come presently after the House rose. So to the Swan, and there sent for a piece of meat and dined alone and played with Sarah, and so to the Hall a while, and thence to Mrs. Martin’s lodging and did what I would with her."

5th November 1666 : "Thence by water to Westminster, and there at the Swan find Sarah is married to a shoemaker yesterday, so I could not see her, but I believe I shall hereafter at good leisure."

30th November 1666 : "Only I did go drink at the Swan, and there did meet with Sarah, who is now newly married, .."

3rd December 1666 : "So having set her down in the palace I to the Swan, and there did the first time ‘baiser’ the little sister of Sarah that is come into her place, and so away by coach home .."

18th December 1666 : "So to Westminster Hall, where the Lords are sitting still, I to see Mrs. Martin, who is very well, and intends to go abroad to-morrow after her childbed. She do tell me that this child did come is ‘meme jour that it ought to hazer after my avoir ete con elle before her marid did venir home.... Thence to the Swan, and there I sent for Sarah, "

10th May 1669 : "Thence I to White Hall, an there took boat to Westminster, and to Mrs. Martin’s, who is not come to town from her husband at Portsmouth. So drank only at Cragg’s with Doll, and so to the Swan, and there baiser a new maid that is there, and so to White Hall again .."


## Swan, Gravesend.

On the 2nd August 1662 : "After dinner we to boat, and had a pleasant passage down to Gravesend, but it was nine o’clock before we got thither, so that we were in great doubt what to do, whether to stay there or no; and the rather because I was afeard to ride, because of my pain...; but at the Swan, finding Mr. Hemson and Lieutenant Carteret of the Foresight come to meet me, I borrowed Mr. Hemson’s horse, and he took another, and so we rode to Rochester .."
[Is this a Swan at Gravesend? The next entry suggests so]

And two days later, on the 4th August 1662 : "Then to a trial of several sorts of hemp, but could not perform it here so well as at Woolwich, but we did do it pretty well. So took barge at the dock and to Rochester, and there Captain Cocke and I and our two men took coach about 8 at night and to Gravesend, where it was very dark before we got thither to the Swan .."

 

137. Swan with Two Necks,

Tuttle street. - Tothill street

In Pepys diary of 4th April 1664 : "and so he was peaceably conducted to the Swan with two Necks, in Tuttle Street, to a handsome dining-room; "


138. Swayns

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139. Three Cranes,

Poultry. The Three Cranes tavern, was destroyed in the fire of 1666, was rebuilt, and is noticed in 1698 .. An halfpenny token of George Twine exists in 1665 for this Three Cranes.

A footnote to Pepys diary mentions the Three Cranes, in Upper Thames street was a suitable place to land before the newer London bridge is built, and to avoid 'shooting' the bridge.

On 26 August 1664, Pepys states : "Thence to the Dockyarde, and there saw the new ship in very great forwardness, and so by water to Deptford a little, and so home and shifting myself, to the ‘Change, and there did business, and thence down by water to White Hall, by the way, at the Three Cranes, putting into an alehouse and eat a bit of bread and cheese."

and the 27 January 1664-5 we have " I sent her away and by and by followed her to the Exchange, and thence led her about down to the 3 Cranes, and there took boat for the Falcon, and at a house looking into the fields there took up and sat an hour or two talking and discoursing ....  Thence away to boat again and landed her at the Three Cranes again, and I to the Bridge, and so home .."

On the 2nd September 1666 (during the great fire), Pepys says : " Good hopes there was of stopping it at the Three Cranes above, and at Buttolph’s Wharf below bridge, if care be used; but the wind carries it into the City so as we know not by the water-side what it do there. " and also "This is very true; so as houses were burned by these drops and flakes of fire, three or four, nay, five or six houses, one from another. When we could endure no more upon the water; we to a little ale-house on the Bankside, over against the ‘Three Cranes, and there staid till it was dark almost, and saw the fire grow; and, as it grew darker, appeared more and more, and in corners and upon steeples, and between churches and houses, as far as we could see up the hill of the City, in a most horrid malicious bloody flame, not like the fine flame of an ordinary fire. Barbary and her husband away before us. "

140. Three Crowns,

Cheapside.. See The Three Cranes, Thames street ??

141. Three Golden Lions,

Cornhill.  Also see the tokens #366 in the Beaufoy collection.

141. Three Mariners,

Lambeth.

On the 12th June 1661, Pepys mentions that : "I to Whitehall, and there with Captain Rolt and Ferrers we went to Lambeth to drink our morning draft, where at the Three Mariners, a place noted for their ale, we went and staid awhile very merry, and so away."

142. Three Tuns,

Charing Cross.

26 June 1660 : "I met with Mr. Throgmorton, a merchant, who went with me to the old Three Tuns, at Charing Cross, who did give me five pieces of gold for to do him a small piece of service about a convoy to Bilbo, which I did."

1 November 1661 : "I went this morning with Sir W. Pen by coach to Westminster, and having done my business at Mr. Montagu’s, I went back to him at Whitehall, and from thence with him to the 3 Tun Tavern, at Charing Cross, and there sent for up the maister of the house’s dinner, and dined very well upon it, and afterwards had him and his fayre sister (who is very great with Sir W. Batten and Sir W. Pen in mirth) up to us .."

4 December 1661 : "To the Temple, and thence to Mr. Phillips and got my copy of Sturtlow lands. So back to the 3 Tuns at Charing Cross, and there met the two Sir Williams and Col. Treswell and Mr. Falconer, and dined there at Sir W. Pen’s cost, and after dinner by water to Cheapside to the painter’s .."

6 December 1661 : "but Sir W. Batten offering to go to the 3 Tuns at Charing Cross, where the pretty maid the daughter of the house is .."

13 November 1668 : "Thence I to the Three Tuns Tavern, by Charing Cross, and there dined with W. Pen, Sir J. Minnes, and Commissioner Middleton; and as merry as my mind could be, that hath so much trouble upon it at home. And thence to White Hall .."

143. Three Tuns,

Crutched friars.

Two tokens #811 and #813 exist for the Three Tuns with initial IEK and TMP for the token issuers.

Pepys refers to this on the 9 May 1667 : "After all this discourse we turned back and to White Hall, where we parted, and I took up my wife at Unthanke’s, and so home, and in our street, at the Three Tuns’ Tavern’ door, I find a great hubbub; and what was it but two brothers have fallen out, and one killed the other. "

144. Three Tuns,

Guildhall Yard.

December 16th, 1654, Richard Major, vintner, at the Three Tons, by Guildhall, died intestate." Richard Smith's Obituary, Sloane MS. 886.  

A token #579 also exists for this Three Tuns

And Pepys states on the 11 February 1659-60 : "Thence we took coach for the City to Guildhall, where the Hall was full of people expecting Monk and Lord Mayor to come thither, and all very joyfull. Here we stayed a great while, and at last meeting with a friend of his we went to the 3 Tun tavern and drank half a pint of wine, and not liking the wine we went to an alehouse, where we met with company of this third man’s acquaintance, and there we drank a little. Hence I went alone to Guildhall to see whether Monk .."

145. Triumph Tavern,

at Charing Cross - this could be the Pageant Tavern of which a token exists

146. Trumpet, King street,

Westminster. A token  #1594 exists of the Trumpet, King street, Westminster, with initials T I C.

147. White Bear,

Cornhill.

There is a Bear Tavern  Token #717  for Cornhill produced in 1654

On the 8 October 1664, Pepys mentions that "All the morning at the office, and after dinner abroad, and among other things contracted with one Mr. Bridges, at the White Bear on Cornhill, for 100 pieces of Callico to make flaggs; and as I know I shall save the King money, so I hope to get a little for my pains and venture of my own money myself."

 

148. White Horse,

King street.

On the 12 March 1659-60, Pepys states : "My wife and I to the Exchange, where we bought a great many things, where I left her and went into London, and at Bedells the bookseller’s at the Temple gate I paid L12 10s. 6d. for Mr. Fuller by his direction. So came back and at Wilkinson’s found Mr. Sheply and some sea people, as the cook of the Nazeby and others, at dinner. Then to the White Horse in King Street, where I got Mr. Buddle’s horse to ride to Huntsmore to Mr. Bowyer’s "

149. White Horse,

Lombard street. There is a White Horse Inn, in Lombard street mentioned in 1785 in the Chancery court of Vyner v Bowes.

"Thence with Sir. W. Batten and Lord Bruncker to the White Horse in Lumbard Streete to dine with Captain Cocke, upon particular business of canvas to buy for the King, and here by chance I saw the mistresse of the house I have heard much of, and a very pretty woman she is indeed and her husband the simplest looked fellow and old that ever I saw" - Pepys 8th March 1665-6
"This night going through bridge by water, my waterman told me how the mistress of the Beare tavern, at the bridge-foot, did lately fling herself into the Thames, and drowned herself; which did trouble me the more, when they tell me it was she that did live at the White Horse tavern in Lumbard Streete, which was a most beautiful woman, as most I have seen". - Pepys 21st February 1666-67

150. White Lion,

Islington.

On the 21 January 1667-68, Pepys notes " So, after the office was up, I to him, and W. Hewer with me, and find him in his sick bed (I never was at their house, this Inne, before) very sensible in discourse and thankful for my kindness to him, and his breath rattled in his throate, and they did lay pigeons to his feet while I was in the house, and all despair of him, and with good reason. But the story is that it seems on Thursday last he went sober and quiet out of doors in the morning to Islington, and behind one of the inns, the White Lion, did fling himself into a pond, was spied by a poor woman and got out by some people binding up hay in a barn there, and set on his head and got to life, and known by a woman coming that way; and so his wife and friends sent for. He confessed his doing the thing, being led by the Devil; and do declare his reason to be, his trouble that he found in having forgot to serve God as he ought, since he come to this new employment: and I believe that, and the sense of his great loss by the fire, did bring him to it, and so everybody concludes. He stayed there all that night, and come home by coach next morning, and there grew sick, and worse and worse to this day. I stayed awhile among the friends that were there, and they being now in fear that the goods and estate would be seized on, though he lived all this while, because of his endeavouring to drown himself, my cozen did endeavour to remove what she could of plate out of the house, and desired me to take my flagons; which I was glad of, and did take them away with me in great fear all the way of being seized; though there was no reason for it, he not being dead, but yet so fearful I was.  "

151. Wills ale house,

Old Palace Yard.

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152. Woods,

Pall Mall.

On 26 July 1660, Pepys refers to "In the evening I met with T. Doling, who carried me to St. James’s Fair, and there meeting with W. Symons and his wife, and Luellin, and D. Scobell’s wife and cousin, we went to Wood’s at the Pell Mell (our old house for clubbing), and there we spent till 10 at night, at which time I sent to my Lord’s for my clerk Will to come to me, and so by link home to bed ."

 

 

There is an online version of Pepys diaries with a good index, which starts at about page 1087. Or the Gutenberg version which is easy to run a textual search.

 

#end#

And Last updated on: Saturday, 01-Aug-2020 08:01:57 BST