Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Cannon street to Charterhouse

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.

CANNON or CHANNEL ROW (Westminster).

B456. Obverse. Thomas . Morice . in . chanell = A gateway with two towers.
R. ROW . HIS . HALFE . PENY . l666 = T . A . M.

CANNON STREET, by London Stone.

Cannon street, formerly known as Candlewick street, the most important quarter of Saxon London, and the early high road through the city. Henry Fitz-Alwyn of " Londenestone," draper, noble by birth, whom the citizens declared should alone rule over them, was mayor of London from 1189 till 1213 inclusive, a period of twenty-four years.

#256 NATHANIELL BAGNE An unicorn, in the field.
Rev. IN CANNON STREETE In the field, N. S. B.

- Unicorn, Cannon street

The unicorn was a favourite exotic introduced among the dramatis personce of the magisterial pageants. In Cooke's City Gallant, 1599, 4to, a city apprentice exclaims, ' ' By this light, I doe not thinke but to be lord mayor of London before I die, and have three pageants carried before me, besides a ship and an unicorn."

The red or Tudor dragon of King Henry the Seventh, as the sinister supporter of the royal arms of England, was displaced for the Scottish unicorn by King James the Sixth of Scotland, when he succeeded to the throne of England upon the decease of Queen Elizabeth.

#257 AT YE WHITE HART A hart lodged, in the field.
Rev. IN CANNON STREETE In the field, B. I. S.

- White Hart, Cannon street

The White Hart lodged, under a tree proper, gorged with a crown, and chained, or, was a badge borne by King Richard the Second. He derived this symbol from his mother, Joan, the fair maid of Kent, daughter, and lastly sole heiress, of Edmund Plantagenet, surnamed of Woodstock, Earl of Kent.

#258 THO : COLCOCK GROCER AT YE Grocers Company arms.
Rev. GOVLDEN KEY IN CANNON STREE A key ; 1D

- Golden Key, Cannon street

One of the large brass pence struck after the fire.

#259 ANNE BLUNT IN A Turk's head, in the field.
Rev. CANNON STREET . 1672 1? amid eight rosettes.

- Turks Head, Cannon street

A coffee-house penny of the largest size.

B458. Obverse. at . ye . black . horse = A horse caparisoned.
R. IN . CANNON . STREETE = I . B. 1/4

- Black Horse, Cannon street

B461. Obverse. William . Burges . at = The Coopers’ Arms.
R. LONDON . STONE . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. 1/2

B463. Obverse. the . whit . lyon . tavern = A lion rampant.
R. in . candle . wick . streete = T . E in monogram. 1/4

- White Lion Tavern, Candlewick street

B464. Obverse. Francis . Heath . in = Hercules, with a club on his shoulder, standing near a beacon.
R. CANNON . STREETE = F . I . H. 1/4

B466. Obverse. Richard . Taylor = A tree between R . T.
R. IN . CANNON . STREETE = 1659. 1/4

B467. Obverse. SAM . TWICKTEN . AT . BLACK = A Swan.
R. IN . CANNON . STREET = S . R . T. 1/4

- Swan, Cannon street


CAREY LANE (Foster Lane, Cheapside).

B468. Obverse. JOHN . HUBBOLD . IN = 1660.
R. CARY . LANE . POTTER = I . A . H. 1/4

B469. Obverse. JOHN . JACKS0N . AT . YE . CROWN = A Crown.
IN . KERRY . LANE . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . I. 1/2

- Crown, Carey lane

B470. Obverse. JOHN . JACKS0N = The Drapers’ Arms.
IN . CAREY . LANE = I . M . I. 1/4

- Drapers Arms, Carey lane


CARTER LANE.

#260 RICHARD HASKER A pendant ball, in the field,
Rev. IN CARTER LANE . 1664 HIS HALFE PENY.

B475. Obverse. Richard . Hasker = A globe on a stand.
R. IN . CARTER . LANE . 1664 = HIS HALFE PENY.
The " golden ball," a sign peculiar to silk mercers.

B471. Obverse. THE . 3 . NEATS . TOVNGS = G . P . A.
R. in . carter . lane = Three tongues. 1/4

- Three tongues, Carter lane

B472. Obverse. THE . DOLPHIN . AT = A dolphin.
R. CARTER . LANE . END = I . M . B. 1/4

- Dolphin, Carter lane


B473. Obverse. ISAAC . BARTHOLOMEW = A Soap-box.
R. SOPE . BOX . CARTER . LANE = I . M . B. 1/4

B474. Obverse. Francis . Gurson . in — A horse, cart, and driver.
R. CARTER . LANE . HIS . HALF . PENY = F . A . G and a rose. 1/4

B476. Obverse. Tho . Outridge . at . carter = A table, on which are a cup, a saucer, and two pipes ; above, a hand holding a cup.
R. lane . end . near . creed . lane = A Turk’s head. l D . ( Octagonal .)

- Turks Head, Carter lane

B477. Obverse. WILLIAM . PROSSER = A goat.
R. IN . CARTER . LANE = W . I . P. 1/4


CASTLE LANE (Petty France or Southwark).

B478. Obverse. Thomas . blake . at . the = A man standing, smoking a pipe.
R. IN . CASTELL . LANE = T . B. 1/4


CASTLE STREET (Long Acre).

B479. Obverse. Henry . Godfrey . in . castle = Two brewers carrying a barrel.
R . STREET . NEAR . LONG . ACRE = HIS HALFE PENY. H . S . G.

- Two Brewers, Long Acre

CASTLE STREET (Piccadilly).

B480. Obverse. JOHN . BAKER . IN . CASTLE . STREET = Two Sceptres crossed, surmounted by a crown.
R. Blank (struck on a large oblong piece). 1

B481. Obverse. THOMAS . WHITE . IN . CASEL = HIS HALF PENY. T . I . W.
R. street . pickadilly . 69 = A stone-sawyer.


CASTLE STREET, Southwark

#261 SAMUELL HODGKINE A cavalier's boot. S. H., in field.
Rev. IN CASTELL STREETE In field, same object, S. H.

#262 RICHARD HODGKINE A cavalier's boot, in the field.
Rev. IN CASTLE STRETE In the field, R. B. H.

Taylor the water-poet, in his Navy of Land Ships, while describing the Fellow-ship, notices her lading being " bootes, spurres, shooes, pan toffies, slippers, galloshes, gammoshoes, and such things as by art or nature are coupled and made fellowes."

Boots were universally worn by fashionable men ; and by others, in imitation of them. Spurs also were worn, whether on horseback or on foot ; the practice, in fact, became so prevalent, that, in the last parliament of Elizabeth, the speaker directed the commons to come to the house without spurs. The practice continued during the seventeenth century, and portraits of persons of any distinction are almost invariably represented in boots, as shown on the token.

The latter token, possibly that of the son, as successor to his father.


CATEATON STREET.

“ Catte Street, corruptly called Catteten Street, beginneth at the north end of Ironmonger Lane, and runneth to the west end of St. Lawrence Church.”—Stow.
This street has since been destroyed for improvements in the City, and was, in 1845, re-named Gresham Street.

#263 THE KINGS ARMES TAVERNE I. E. W[ARE ?], in the field.
Rev. IN CATEATON STREETE The same initials.

- Kings Arms, Cateaton street

B489. Obverse. Roger . Ware . 1664 = The King’s Arms.
R. IN . CATEATEN . STREET = HIS HALF PENNY.

- Kings Arms, Cateaton street

Stow, describing the north wing of Cheap ward, at the close of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, mentions, " Catte street, corruptly Catteton street." J. W. was possibly of the Ware family ; as a Roger Ware issued, in 1664, a half-penny token, bearing the royal arms, " in Cateaton street," now named Gresham street.

B482. Obverse. Thomas . Betton . at = Three lions couchant.
R. CATTEATEN . STRET = T . B. 1/4

B483. Obverse. George . Francklin = Bust of a Turk, holding a coffee cup.
R. IN . CATEATEN . STREF.TE = HIS HALF PENY.

B484. Obverse. Partridg . Hatton = A fleece.
R. IN . CATEATON . STRET = P . I . H. 1/4

- Fleece, Cateaton street

B485. Obverse. Thomas . Lacy . his .  1/2 . peny = A female bust; around ROXCEL LANA.
R. IN . CATEATEN . STREETE = T . M . L. 1/2

This token probably refers to Elizabeth Davenport, popularly called Roxcelana, from her success in that role in Sir W. Davenant’s play, “ The Siege of Rhodes.”
She is mentioned by Evelyn, Pepys, and Grammont, and appears to have been a great favourite with the public. Possibly this lady was related to the actor so
commended by Pepys.

It is nearly certain that token No. 1960 was issued by Lacy’s wife, for the Mary on that corresponds to the initial M. on this, and the busts seem to represent the same person.

B486. Obverse. Rob . Snow . at . white = A lion rampant.
R. IN . CATTEATEN . STREET = R . A . S. 1/4

B488. Obverse. George . Wade . at . YE = The sun in splendour.
R. IN . CATEATEN . STREET = G . R . W. 1/4

“ If any man has taken them [“a new Sack marqu’d with G, wherein was one pair of Sheets,” etc.] up, and shall give notice to Mr. Wade, at the Sun in Cat-eat-en-street by Guildhall . . . he shall be well rewarded for his peyns.”—The Newes,
No. 2, Jan. 7, 1663, p. 15.

B490. Obverse. at . te . george . in = St. George and the Dragon.
R. Cateton . street = Detrited.

- George & Dragon, Cateaton street

ST. CATHARINE'S, East of the Tower.

Howell, in his Londinopolis, 1657, folio, p. 341, observes, "from the liberties of St. Katherine to Wapping, 'tis yet in the memory of man, there never was a house standing, but the gallows, which was further removed in regard of the buildings ; but now there is a continued street towards a mile long, from the Tower all along the river almost as far as Ratcliffe, which proceedeth from the increase of navigation, mariners, and trafique."

#264 ROBERT ASKE IN An open arched crown, in the field.
Rev. ST. KATHERNS : SALTER In the field, R. A.  1/4

#265 WILLIAM BUTLER IN S. The Grocers Company arms.
Rev. KATHERNS . GROCER In the field, W. I. B.

#266 WILLIAM BUTLER IN S. Two sugar-loaves braced, in the field.
Rev. KATHERINS . GROSER In field,  W. I. B.

#267 AT THE DEARY MADE A woman churning, in the field.
Rev. IN s. KATHARNS.1653 In the field, M. S. W.

A cheese-factor's sign.

#268 JOHN HAWARD IN ST. A pair of spectacles, in the field.
Rev. KATRANS . SPECTELE MAKER In field, I. M. H.

The sign derived from the charge, the old-fashioned barnacles or nose-squeezer, on the shield of the Spectacle-makers Company. Spectacles are asserted to have been invented at the close of the thirteenth century, by Alexander Spina, a monk of Pisa, who died at an advanced age in 1313 ; but, although Pliny in his chapter of inventions mentions them not, Pancirollus, who quotes Plautus, " Vitrum cedo necesse est conspicilio uti," proves they were in use by the ancients.

#269 AT THE BLACK SWAN Swan, with collar and chain.
Rev. IN SANT . KATARNS . 1659 In the field, I. K. H.

- Black Swan, St Catharines

#270 Thomas Houkroft 1665 In three lines, on obverse.
Rev. BY YE CAGE IN ST KATHERNS In field, T. M. H.

Taylor the water-poet, after describing the five gaols or prisons in Southwark, in his time, in allusion to the cage in St. Catherine's, adds

" Crosse but the Thames unto S. Katherins then,
There is another hole or den for men.
Another in East Smithfield, little better,
Will serve to hold a theefe or paltry debter."

Praise and Vertue of a Jayle.

#271 THOMAS LACY. 1669 St. George and Dragon, in field.
Rev. IN ST. KATERNS In the field, HIS HALF PENY.

- George and Dragon, St Catharines

B2610. Obverse. RICHARD. GILBURT = HIS HALF PENY.
R. in . ST . Katharins = St George and the Dragon.

- George and Dragon, St Catharines


B2612. Obverse. AT . THE . BLACK . SWAN = A Swan.
R. IN . SANT . KATARNES . 1659 = I . K . H. 1/4

- Black Swan, St Catharines



B2617. Obverse. Thomas . Houlcroft . 1665 (in three lines across the field).
R. BY . YE . CAGE . IN . ST. KATHERNS = T . M . H. 1/4

Taylor, the water-poet, after describing the five gaols or prisons in Southwark,
in his time, in allusion to the cage in St. Catherine’s, adds :
“ Crosse but the Thames unto S. Katherins then,
There is another hole or den for men.
Another in East Smithfield, little better,
Will serve to hold a theefe or paltry debter.”—[B.]

B2618. Obverse. John . Jarvis . baker = A shield of arms.
R. IN . ST . KATRINS . 1653 = I . M . I. 1/4

B2619. Obverse. the . 3 . tobacco . pipes = Three tobacco-pipes.
R. IN . S . KATHERINS = R . D . L. 1/4

B2620. Obverse. the . 3 . tobacco . rovls = Three rolls of tobacco.
R. IN . S . KATHERINS . LANE = T . E . L. 1/4

B2621. Obverse. Thomas . Lacy . 1669 = St. George and the Dragon.
R. IN . ST . KATHERENS = HIS HALF PENY.

- George and Dragon, St Catharines


B2622. Obverse. Edward . Lolesene (in three lines across the field).
R. IN . ST . KATHERINS = A key. 1/4

B2624. Obverse. JOHN . PERREY . NEARE . Y E . BARE (in four lines).
R. BREW . HOUSE . IN . ST . KATHRENS . 1669 (in five lines). 1/4



ST. CATHARINE'S COURT.

#272 AT THE COOPERS ARMS In the field, the Coopers' arms.
Rev. IN S. KATHERNS CURT I. A. H., in the field.

- Coopers Arms, St Catharines court

#273 MARKE HEYNES IN In the field, HIS HALF PENY.
Rev. S. KATHERNS COURT Coopers Company arms.

B2609. Obverse. John . Edwards = A wheatsheaf.
R. IN . S . KATHERNES . COURT = I . M . E. 1/2

- Wheatsheaf, St Catharines court


B2613. Obverse. JOHN . HAWARD . IN . HELMET = HIS HALFE PENY.
R. COURT . in . St . Katherns = St. George and the Dragon.

- George and Dragon, St Catharines court


ST. CATHARINE'S DOCK.


#274 THOMAS HOCKWELL In the field, a horse and cart.
Rev. IN s. KATERENS DOCK T. B. H., in the field.

Taylor the water-poet, in his splenetic invective against coaches, entitled, The World Runnes on Wheeles, observes, "A cart is the emblem of a man, the noblest of all creatures, and a coach is the figure of a beast ; for as man hath two legges, a cart hath two wheeles. The coach being in the like sense the true resemblance of a beast ; by which is parabolically demonstrated, that as much as men are superior to beasts, so much are honest and needful carts more nobly to be regarded and esteemed above needless, upstart, fantastical, and time-troubling coaches."

#275 GILBERT TAYLER AT HIS HALF PENY, in the field.
Rev. ST KATHERNS DOCK In the field, an archer.
B2592. Obverse. the . Kinges . Head = Bust of Henry VIII.
R. AT . S . KATERNS . DOCK = R . S . B. 1/4

- Kings Head, St Catharines dock

B2595. Obverse. ROBERT. BLACKBURN = HIS HALF PENY.
R. at . s . katherns . dock = The Fishmongers’ Arms. 1/2

- Fishmongers’ Arms, St Catharines dock

B2601. Obverse. AT . THE . LEE . HOY = A boat.
R. NEARE . S . KATERNS . DOCK = T . I . C. 1/4

B2605. Obverse. JOHN . COULTON. 1667 = A globe.
R. AT . S . KATHERINS . DOCKE = HIS HALF PENY. I . A . C.

- Globe, St Catharines dock

ST. CATHARINES LANE.

#276 AT THE BLACK BOY IN A Negro boy, with tobacco leaves.
Rev. ST. KATHERNS LANE In field, W. A. B.

- Black Boy, St Catharines lane


The same chubby-faced ebonized resemblance of humanity generally adopted by the tobacco sellers of this period, is still the prevailing sign of tobacconists.

#277 FRANCIS CLARKE IN HIS HALF PENY, in the field.
Rev. ST. KATHERNS LANE In field, three tobacco-rolls.

#278 THE 3 TOBACCO ROVLS Three tobacco-rolls, in the field.
Rev. IN s. KATHERINS LANE In the field, T. E. L.

Pendant black rolls, representing coils of tobacco, partially gilded, still constitute the exterior decoration of tobacconists' shops. Taylor the water-poet, who evinces a hatred of tobacco, describes the vendor as

" The smoakie black lung-puff 'd tobacconist,
Whose joy doth in tobacco sole consist."

#279 AT THE 2 DRAYMEN Two brewers, with slung barrel.
Rev. IN ST. KATHERINS LANE In the field, T. A. D.

- Two Brewers, St Catharines lane

The king's brewery was in the olden time at St. Catharine's. Henry Machin, in his Diary, October, 9th, 1551, records " Giles, the king's beer-brewer, dwelling at St. Catharine's, who had bled to death from a scratch on his leg, was buried this day at Aldgate, with heraldic emblazonments of his arms, and the craft of the Brewers."

The brewhouse was probably that spoken of elsewhere, in 1650, as the Bear brewhouse. There are frequent allusions to it in the ballads of that day.

#280 JOHN CURTIS IN A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev. S. KATHERINS LANE In the field, I. F. C.

- Wheatsheaf, St Catharines lane

#281 JAMES COOPER AT THE Rose and crown.
Rev. IN ST. KATHERNS LANE . HIS HALF PENY . I. A. C. 1668.

- Rose and Crown, St Catharines lane

Octangular in form.

#282 JOHN CHEQVRIGHT IN In the field, HIS HALF PENY.
Rev. ST. KATHERINS LANE . 1669 A bell, I. S. C.

- Bell, St Catharines lane

ST. CATHARINE'S MILL BRIDGE.
#283 RICHARD BRYAN . 1667 In the field, HIS HALF PENY.
Rev. AT ST. KATHERN . MIL . BRIDG R. M. B., in field.

B2590. Obverse. JAMES . ALLEN . IN = 1665.
R. ST . KATHERENS . LANE = I . M . A . 1/4

B2599. Obverse. the . sword . and . dager = A sword and dagger.
R. IN . S . KATHERINS . LANE = I . A . C. 1/4

B2600. Obverse. AT . THE . BLEW . BELL = A bell.
R. IN . S . KATHERINS . LANE = I . S . C. 1/4

- Blue Bell, St Catharines lane

B2625. Obverse. HENRY . ROWE . IN . ST = HIS HALF PENY.
R. Kathernes . mealeman = The Bakers’ Arms. 1/2

- Bakers Arms, St Catharines lane

B2626. Obverse. William . Stanion = A gridiron.
R. IN . S T . KATHERNS . LANE = A Sugar-loaf. b

- Sugar loaf, St Catharines lane

B2627. Obverse. Daniel . Stutsbery . in . ST . 68 = The Coopers’ Arms.
R. KATHERNS . LANE . WINE . COOPR = HIS HALF PENY. D . E . S.

- Coopers Arms, St Catharines lane

B2628. Obverse. AT . THE . BLEW . BELL . IN = A bell,
R. S . Katherns . lane . 1649 = R . T and three birds. 1/4

- Bell, St Catharines lane

ST. CATHARINE'S STAIRS.

#284 THE PLUME OF FEATHERS Prince's plume, in the field.
Rev. AT KATRINS STEARS In the field, E. A. N.   1/4

- Plume of Feathers, St Catharines stairs

The Feathers, or plume of feathers, generally supposed to have originated with Edward the Black Prince, was long before, according to Guillim, a badge or device borne by King Stephen, who died in 1154 ; the motto

" Vi nulla invertitur ordo ;" No force alters their fashion.

Camden, in his Remains, edit. 1605, p. 161, is the earliest printed authority for the appropriation of the ostrich feathers, and the words ICH DIEN, as the badge and motto of Edward the Black Prince, an assertion that has occasioned considerable doubt and difficulty. The battle of Crecy, or Cressy, was fought on Saturday, August 26th, 1346. In that conflict, Prince Edward is said to have slain the King of Bohemia, and that he adopted the ostrich feathers from the same  having been borne as the crest of the fallen monarch. It is true there is extant a contemporary allusion in support of this assertion, in a medical treatise by John de Ardern, a physician attached to the court of King Edward the Third ; and among the Sloane MSS., Nos. 56, 76, and 335, are three several copies of John de Ardern's work, in which, in the chapter on Haemorrhoids, the allusion is thus made to the feather of the Prince of Wales :

" Et nota quod talem pennam albam portabat Edwardus primogenitus films Edwardi Regis Angliae super crestam suam, et illam pennam conquisivit de Rege Boemiae quern interfecit apud Cresse in Francia ; et sic assumpsit sibi illam pennam quse dicitur ostrich f ether, quam prius dictus rex nobilissimus portabat super crestam. Et eodem anno quo dictus strenuus et bellicosus princeps migravit ad Dominum, scripsi libellum istum manu propria, videlicet anno Domini 13/6 ; et dictus Edwardus princeps obiit vi. idus Junii, videlicet die Sanctse Trinitatis, apud Westmonasterium in magno Parliamento, quern Deus absolvat, qui fuit flos milicise mundi sine pare."

In the margin of all the three manuscripts is the representation of a single ostrich feather, with a riband or label across the quill part.

Edward the Black Prince, in a letter dated April 25th, 1370, wrote his motto in full " HOUMOUT ICH DIEN," words that, supposing them to be old Flemish, would imply "High spirit, I serve." There are good reasons, notwithstanding the authorities referred to above, that the device, as borne by Edward the Black Prince, was in fact derived from his mother, Queen Philippa, and from the house of Hainault ; possibly from the Comte of Ostrevant, that formed the appanage of the eldest sons of the counts of that province.

#285 BRIAN WEAVER AT ST. A roll of tobacco, in the field.
Rev. KATHERINS STAIRES In the field, B. w.

#286 Edward Belitha . Grocer HIS DOUBLE TOKEN FOR A - 1/2D?
Rev. AT S. KATHERN STAIRES Two sugar-loaves. 1669.

- Two Sugar loaves, St Catharines stairs

CHAIN GATE, Southwark.

#287 THE RED LION . CHAINE Lion rampant, in the field.
Rev. GATE IN SOVTHWARK In the field, s. K. T.

The Red Lion had doubtless its origin, as a sign, long prior to the accession of King James the First, in compliment to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, fourth son of King Edward the Third and father of King Henry the Fourth. The duke was at all times popular ; and the powerful support he rendered to the new faith, as set forth by Wickliffe the morning star of the reformation in England, was calculated to increase that popularity. His marriage with Constance, daughter of Pedro the Cruel, king of Castile, gave him, on the death of his father-in-law, a claim to the throne of Castile and Leon ; and a boss in the cloisters at Canterbury has heraldic charges in reference to his title as king of Castile and Leon. On a castle, or, is a shield, argent, charged with a lion rampant, gules, the arms of Leon. From these insignia, it is not improbable that the castle and the red lion were, together or separately, adopted as symbolical by his partizans, and as such adopted by persons who occupied houses of general resort.

- Red Lion, Chain Gate, Southwark

CHANCERY LANE, Fleet Street.

Matthew Carter, in his Analysis of Honor, 1655, p. 245, says that "Chancery lane is so called, for that King Edward the Third, in 1341, the fifteenth year of his reign, annexed the House of Covents by patent to the office of Chancery, now called the Rolls." This is however erroneous: Chancery lane is a perversion of " the Chancellor's lane," a name by which that way was long before known, in the reign of King Henry the Third.

In the manuscript diary of William White way, Egerton MS. in Museo, 784, is recorded, ' ' Dec. 20th, 1621, a fire broke out in Chancery lane, by the negligence of a clerk, and burn'd ten houses, with a great number of records, and two lords houses ; but went no further."

#288 THE KINGS HEAD TAVERN King Henry the Eighth.
Rev. AT CHANCERY LANE END T. A. K., in the field.  1/4

- Kings Head, Chancery lane

The imprint on the title to Forde's Ladies Triall, 1639, 4to, has " Printed for Henry Shephard, in Chancery lane, at the signe of the Bible, between Sarjant's Inne and Fleet street, near the King's-head taverne."

A gentleman having drank very hard at the King's-head tavern, reeling up Chancery lane, happened to reel within the rails of the pump, where keeping his motion round so long, he tired, and, leaning on the rails, asked from within, of a passer by, where he was ; " Over against the Chancery/' was the reply; " I  thought so/' said he, "and the reason, I think, I shall never get out of this place." Cambridge Jests. The Chancery is now the Rolls Court.

Hogarth, in his print of " Burning the Rumps," at Chancery lane end, one of the large series of his illustrations to Butler's Hudibras, published in 1726, has included a view of the King's-head tavern.

“ ‘ King’s Head Tavern,’ ‘ an elegant mansion ’ of Edward the Sixth’s reign, formerly stood at the S.W. corner of Chancery Lane. Its sign was the head of Henry the Eighth, and the house is said to have occupied the site of the residence of Sir John Oldcastle, Baron Cobham (Shakespeare’s Sir John Falstaff), who met so ignominious a death in St. Giles’s Fields in 1417. ... In the seventeenth century taverns were not restricted to ground floors : hence the fact of Richard Marriot, subsequently Isaac Walton’s publisher, ‘keeping shop in 1665’ under the ‘King’s Head Taverne.’ At this house met the Popish Plot conspirators of 1678, the council being headed by Lord Howard ; and here were the meetings of the ‘ Green Ribbon Club ’—a society of men without religion or morals, whose chief aim was to make others as bad as themselves. . . . The old house, five stories high, of carved oak, was pulled down for City improvements in 1799, and is engraved in J. T. Smith’s ‘Ancient Typography.’”—Noble’s Memorials of  Temple Bar , p. 111.

“ 1680-1682.—These years were signalized by ‘ the Burning of the Tope ’ opposite the ‘ King’s Head Tavern,’ by Chancery Lane, on the 17 of November, the
anniversary of Queen Elizabeth’s succession. . . . The exhibition was political and Protestant, though chiefly the former, and was got up by the ‘ Green Ribbon Club,’ meeting at the ‘ King’s Head,’ over against the Inner Temple Gate, next Chancery Lane. . . . Roger North stood and viewed the ceremony from the vicinity of the ‘Green Dragon Tavern.’”—Noble’s Memorials of Temple Bar , P- 5 L

“The King’s Head Tavern at Chancery-Lane End, where, at this time, the Hones test Vintner in London lives, where the best Wine in England is to be Drank, and the Stateliest piece of Beef in Christendom is to be Roasted .”—“ London Spy,” by Ned Ward,* 1718, part ii., p. 280.

Then follows an account of the cutting up of a huge piece of beef, and of the roasting thereof a few days afterwards.

See also King's-head tavern, FLEET STREET, Nos. 482, 483, 484.

#289 AT THE HOLE IN THE WALL Wall, with circular hole.
Rev, IN CHANCERY LANE . 1651 In field, I. M. F.  1/4

- Hole in the Wall, Chancery lane

The house, situated on the east side, is immediately opposite the old gate of Lincoln's Inn ; and, being supported by the dependants on legal functionaries, appears to have undergone fewer changes than the law, retaining all the vigour of a new establishment.

“The Hole-in-the-Wall still (1849) exists. But not now (1888). It was a popular sign, and several taverns bore the same designation, which probably originated in a certain tavern being situated in some umbrageous recess in the old city walls. . . . Rawlins, the engraver, . . . dates a quaint supplicatory letter to John Evelyn, ‘from the Hole in the Wall, in St. Martin’s.’ . . . Among other places which bore the designation of the Hole in the Wall, there was one in Chandos Street, in which the famous Duval, the highwayman, was apprehended, after an attack on— two bottles of wine, probably drugged by a ‘friend,’ or a mistress.”—Akerman’s London Tradesmen's Tokens.

#290 F. W. AT THE GOLDEN CROS Maltese, or cross pattee.
Rev. IN CHANCERY LANE In the field, F. A. W.

#291 AT THE GLOBE TAVERN A globe, in the field.
Rev. IN CHANCERIE LANE In the field, T. E. L.  1/4

- Globe Tavern, Chancery lane

B512. Obverse. John . Langston . at . the = A globe on a stand.
R. TAV . IN . CHANCERY . LANE . 67 = HIS HALFE PENY.

- Globe, Chancery lane

#292 EDWARD CODDINGTON A skull, in the field.
Rev. IN CHANCERY LANE In the field, E. M. C.

Query, Was Coddington one of the medical profession, by this memento mori ?
The famous Dr. Caius, who died July 29th, 1573, bequeathed to his friend Justice Wray " a ring with a death's head."
The death's head on a ring was customarily worn at this period, as a species of repentance for past errors. Gnotho, in Massinger's Old Law, bids Agatha his wife, in the tavern, as a preparative to leaving this world " Down on thy knees, and make thee ready : sell some of thy cloathes to buy thee a death's head, and put upon thy middle finger." Act iv. sc. 1.

#293 ABRA : HUDSON . APOTHECARY AT Apothecaries' arms.
Rev. THE BLEW BOAR . IN CHANCERY LANE A boar.

The unicorn, as fictionized in heraldry, is a white horse, having the horn of the narwhale emanating from the forehead ; the belief in the animal being based on the passage in Job, ch. xxxix. v. 9, " Will the unicorn be willing to serve thee ?" but the original word " Rem," thus translated " unicorn," is, by St. Jerome, Montanus, and Aquila, rendered ' ' rhinoceros" ; and in the Septuagint, "monoceros," signifying nothing more than " one horn." The rhinoceros is therefore the misinterpreted unicorn of the ancients ; and, from a belief in the fabulous medicinal qualities of the horn, has been advanced as the crest of the Company of Apothecaries, on some of whose sign -boards the rhinoceros presented the similitude of anything but the real beast ; and being frequently mistaken for a boar, the practice of painting the monster became more monstrous, and the boar proper has, to be more agreeable to the eye, been bedizened as a blue boar.

#294 THE WHITE SWAN A swan, in the field.
Rev. IN CHANCERY LANE In the field, E. A. S.  1/4

- White Swan, Chancery lane

The swan argent was a badge of King Henry the Fifth, derived from the earldom of Hereford.

The following advertisement, which appeared in the Newes, No. 36, May II, 1665, p. 316, gives the name of the issuer of this token, Edmond Sturmey :
“ Stollen or strayed, about the beginning of this present May, ... a bright bay Nag, between 13 and 14 hand high. . . . Whoever shall give notice of him to Mr. Edmond Sturmey, at the White Swan in Chancery Lane . . . shall have 10s. for his pains.”


#295 HUMPHREY TAFT AT THE Anchor and sword, in field,
Rev. AT CHANCERY LANE END CUTLER . 1665.

#296 THE S. JONS HEAD TAVERN Bearded head, in a charger.
Rev. IN CHANCERY LANE In the field, R. M. H.

- St Johns Head Tavern, Chancery lane

The Baptist tavern appears to have met a disastrous fate during the great fire, from some misplaced fear. Sir Edward Atkins, then a baron of the Exchequer, in a letter dated from Lincoln's Inn, September 8th, 1666, addressed to his brother Robert in Gloucestershire, describing the ravages he had witnessed, says " Chancery lane is yet standing, except the St. John's Head near Lincoln's Inn, which was pulled downe, by way of prevention, and another house towards Holborne." The tavern was rebuilt, and its site appears to be identified in the following resolution " Saturday, February 5th, 1772, the Society of Lincoln's Inn have determined on a plan that has long been in agitation, to take down all the old buildings, except the chapel and hall, and to build a grand row all up Chancery lane, from the Anchor and Baptist tavern, the north end of the garden wall." The tavern at the termination of the wall, towards Holborn, now bears the sign of the White Hart.

#297 LEOPARD TAVERN IN A spur, and I. S. I., in the field.
Rev. CHANCERY LANE . 1665 HIS HALFE PENNY.

#298 WILLIAM BRAMPTON . 1666 An unicorn, in the field.
Rev. MILINOR . IN CHANCERY LANE In field, W. K. B.

- Unicorn, Chancery lane

The unicorn was most probably the sign of a previous occupant, or series of occupants, and had no reference to Brampton's occupation.

#299 THE POPES HEAD TAVERN Pope's head with the tiara.
Rev. IN CHANCERYE LANE In the field, W. B. I.

- Popes Head Tavern, Chancery lane

Query, Was the sign of the Pope's Head adopted in compliance with the phrase bibere papaliter, to drink like a Pope ? Priests, in all ages and countries, have been and are generally accounted bon-vivants. So Horace, inveighing against the sober thrift of Postumus, insists on a more generous course

" Then shall your worthier heir discharge,
And set th' imprison'd casks at large,
And dye the floor with wine,
So rich and precious, not the feasts
Of pontifis chear their ravish'd guests
With liquor more divine." Book ii. Ode 14.

" And after that took Wooten and Brigden to the Pope’s Head Taverne, in Chancery Lane, where Gilb. Holland and Shelton were, and we dined and drank a great deal of wine, and they paid all.”—Pepys’ Diary , March 22, 1659-60.

#300 HENRY REDMAN . 1666 Pope's head, with tiara and staff.
Rev. IN CHANCERIE LANE HIS HALF PENY.

- Popes Head, Chancery lane

Redman was possibly a new occupant of the old Pope's Head tavern, after the fire in September, 1666, had dislodged him from a more eastward direction.

#301 Turk's Head George Dayhin, in script characters across the field.
Rev. Att the Coffee House in Chancery Lane, in five lines.

- Turks Head, Chancery lane

B497. Obverse. George . Daphin = A Turk’s head.
R. Att . The . Coffee . House . in . Chancery . Lane (in five lines). 1/2

- Turks Head, Chancery lane

#302 Turk's Head In the field, Robert Terrey his 1/2 D .
Rev. Att the Coffee House in Chancery Lane, in script.

- Turks Head, Chancery lane

From the Newes, No. 73, September 7, 1665, p. 839, it appears that an “excellent Electuary and Drink” was sold by “Robert Terry, at the Coffee house in
Chancery Lane.”
Terry appears to have been the successor of Dayhin after the fire, the ravages of which ceased at a large house in Fleet street, a door or two east of Fetter lane.


B491. Obverse. JOHN . BODINGTON . AT . YE = HIS HALF PENY.
R. celler . in . chancery . lane = A bunch of grapes.

- Bunch of Grapes, Chancery lane

B493. Obverse. John . Bush . at . the = An arched crown.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = I . D . B. 1/4

- Crown, Chancery lane

B494. Obverse. at . the . CROWNE = An arched crown.
R. IN . CHANCEREY . LANE = E . M . C. 1/4

- Crown, Chancery lane

B495. Obverse. at . the . horns . in = A pair of antlers.
R. CHAINCERY . LANE = I . E . C. 1/4

- Horns, Chancery lane

B498. Obverse. AT . THE . HOLE . IN . THE . WALL = A Wall, with a hole in it.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE . HIS . HALF . PENY. I . M . F (in five lines). 1/2

- Hole in the Wall, Chancery lane

B501. Obverse. Barth . Hall . millener = A goat browsing from a tree.
R. IN . CHANCERY. LANE. I 668 = HIS HALF PENY. B . E . H. 1/2

B502. Obverse. Thomas . Harris . 1667 = A Castle.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1/2

- Castle, Chancery lane

B503. Obverse. Thomas. Harris = A Castle.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = T . E . H. 1/4

- Castle, Chancery lane

“ Lost by a Gentleman, an Emperour’s Head, exquisitely cut in a sad-coloured Agat, and set in silver. If any Person hath found the same, let them bring it to Mr. Harris, his house, at the sign of the Castle , in Chancery-lane, they shall have twice the vallue of it for their pains.”— Mercnrius Publicus , Nov. 28 to Dec. 5, 1661, p. 759.

B504. Obverse. John . Henthorne . at . the . St = The head of St. John the Baptist in a dish.
R. TAVERNE . IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . M . H.

B505. Obverse. O. RANDOLPH . HOPLEY = A Spur.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = R . G . H. 1/4

B507. Obverse. Ralph . Hutchinson . at . ye . gray = A friar holding his rosary.
R. FRYER . IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B513. Obverse. JOHN . LOCKE . IN . WHITES = I . L.
R. ALLY . IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALF PENY.

B514. Obverse. WILLIAM . MART. CHANCEREY = HIS HALFE PENY.
R. LANE . END . IN . FLEET . STREET = Bust of Henry VIII. with orb and sceptre ; above, W . K . M. 1/2

This house seems to have been a favourite with Pepys, who records frequent visits thither.

B515. Obverse. Ralph . Massie . at . ye . roles = Three rolls of paper.
R. TAVERN . IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. 1667.

B516. Obverse. Thomas . Newsam . in = A double-headed eagle displayed.
R. CHANCERY. LANE. l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY.*

B517. Obverse. at . Ye . Ould . Parrs . Head = Profile of an old man with a ruff.
R. CHANCERY . LANE . A . HALF . PENY = D . E . P.

B518. Obverse. at . the . bible . 1666 = A book with clasps.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = R . P. 1/2

The following advertisement, which appeared in the Mercurius Pub liens, No. 11, March 12-19, 1662, p. 177, and in the Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 12, March
16-23, 1662, p. 205, gives the name of the issuer of this token, Pawley.

For booksellers’ tokens, vide Appendix.
“ One tall Sandy-gray Gelding . . . One little Bay-Nag, about thirteen hands high . . . One lesser Sorrel Nag . . . All these strayed away on Thursday last, being the 12 of this instant March. If any one can bring word of them ... at Mr. Paivleys, a Book-seller at the Bible in Chancery-lane, he shall be well contented for his pains.”

* Originally published in 1698.

“ He that can give notice of him [“ a brown Bay-Gelding-colt ”] to Mr. Robert Pawley, at the signe of the Bible in Chancery-lane, London, . . . shall have 40s. for his pains .”—Mercurius Publicus , No. 16, April 16-23, 1663, p. 249.

“ In Leicestershire, between Thorp and Waltham on the Olds . . . was lost a sorrel Gelding with a bald face. . . . Whoever shall bring tydings of him to Mr. Pawley, in Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, or to Mr. Robert Pawley, a Stationer at the Bible in Chancery Lane, London, shall have 40s.”—The Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 17, April 20-27, 1663, p. 269.

This seems to show that Pawley was a Leicestershire man. He was a printer, as appears from Ashbee’s List.

B519. Obverse. DANIEL . PHILPOT = D . I . P.
R. Middle . lane . chancery = The Mercers’ Arms. 1/4

B521. Obverse. Joh . Rider | at. ye . Coffee . House. at. the | Rolls . gate . in . Chancery . Lane (in six lines).
R. his . half . peny = A Turk’s head.

B522. Obverse. Will . Rosse . at . the . black = A double-headed spread eagle.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY.

B526. Obverse. John . Turner . at . the = A friar’s head (?).
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . D . T.

B527. Obverse. BLACK . SPRED . EAGLE = I . S . V.
R. in . chancery . lane = A spread eagle. 1/4

B528. Obverse. O. WILL . WOOTEN . AT . YE . GRAY = A monk.
R. FRYER . IN . CHANCERY . LANE = HIS HALF PENY.

B529. Obverse. F . W . AT . THE . GOLDEN . CROS = A Cross.
R. IN . CHANCERY . LANE = F . A . W. 1/4

CHANDOS STREET (Covent Garden).

B530. Obverse. JOHN . BEAUMONT . AT . YE . GOLDEN = A ball. I . D . B. 1/4
R. IN . SHANDO . STREET . COVENT GARD = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B531. Obverse. Thomas .Beckemsfeild = Three kings crowned, with sceptres.
R. IN . SHANDOES . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B532. Obverse. Edward . Boswell . at . 3 . elme s = Three trees.
R. IN . SHANDAS . SREETE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. E. D. B.

B533. Obverse. R . C. ... = A key.
R. in . shandol . stret (in three lines).

B534. Obverse. at . the . gate = A five-barred gate.
R. IN . SHANDOS . STREET = I . D . K. 1/4

B535. Obverse. Rob . Risbey . in . shandoes = A double-headed eagle.
R. STREET . IN . COVENT . GARDEN = HIS HALF PENY. R . A . R.

B536. Obverse. George . Warner = A man holding a harpoon.
R. SHON D . ST R . BED F . BERY = G . A . W. 1/4



Change Alley, see EXCHANGE ALLEY.

CHARING CROSS.

Somner says the Anglo-Sax, cyrrung from cyrran, avertere, was a name in olden time given to places where several roads met or diverged thence; "this, by perversion, became cerring, and at length passed into charing, as now-a-days is named that quadrimwm, or place where four roads meet, near Westminster, commonly called Chariiig-Crosse ; Crosse being added on account of the cross formerly erected there, as was usual in places where several roads conjoined."

Others have derived Charing from Chere Reitie, a name assumed in compliment to a cross erected here in memory of Queen Eleanor, consort of King Edward the First, who died in November, 1290, and was buried in Westminster Abbey; but this conjecture is nullified by the occurrence of the word Charing in the petition to King Henry the Third, in 1261, from William de Radnor, bishop of Llandaff, praying for leave to abide, during his visits to or sojourn in London, " in the cloister of his hermitage at Charing."

#303 MARKE RIDER . AT THE SWAN Swan ; grapes in its beak, in field.

Rev. AGAINST THE MEWES . 1665 HIS HALFE PENNY.

The steward's accounts of disbursements by or for Sir John Howard, subsequently created Duke of Norfolk, and slain on Richard's side at Bosworth field, show the Swan to have been an old house of repute :

" xxj day of Feverer, 1466-7. Item, my mastyr paid for his costes at the Swan at Westemenstre ijs. ijd."

The Swan, in Ben Jonson's time, was either distinguished for the excellence of the wine, or the poet had secured to himself the good offices of Ralph the waiter. At some court conviviality, that followed the marriage of Frederic Palgrave of Bohemia and King James's daughter Elizabeth, Ben Jonson was required extemporaneously to say grace, with which he complied :

" Our king and queen, the Lord God blesse !
The paltzgrave and the lady Besse ;
And God blesse every living thing
That lives and breathes, and loves the king.
God bless the councill of estate,
And Buckingham the fortunate.
God blesse them all, and keepe them safe ;
And God blesse me, and God blesse Rafe."

The invocations in honour and praise of Great Britain's Solomon*, and his sfamily, were sufficiently agreeable to the feelings of the monarch ; but the association of Rafe was to royal ideas incomprehensible, and he became mightily inquisitive respecting him. Ben told the king that Rafe or Ralph was the drawer at the Swan tavern by Charing cross, who drew him good canary. For this drollery, as Aubrey states, His Majesty gave the poet an hundred pounds ! The fact, however, has to be doubted.

The swan on the obverse of this token differs from all others ; the head is crowned, and in the bill is a bunch of grapes.

Pepys appears to have been so consternated by the ravages of the great fire in 1666, as scarcely to have been master of himself. On September 6th, he records his wandering to the Swan, and was there shaved, l< trimmed," as he terms it; " and to Whitehall, but saw nobody, and so home," by water to the Navy office in Crutched friars. On the 7th, again to the Swan, with the same result.

The " Swan near the Mewes," was a distinction from another tavern of some celebrity, " the Swan in the Strand, near Charing cross." See No. 1123.

#304 THE PAGEANT TAVERNE AT CHARING CROSSE I. W., in a wreathed circle.

Rev. A triumphal arch, with three passages.

B553 Obverse. THE . PAGEANT . TAVERNE . AT . CHARING . CROSSE . I . W (in six lines within a garland).
R. A triumphal arch with three gates, within a garland. 1/2

The Pageant tavern had as a sign a pictorial representation of one of the triumphal arches erected in Fleet street and the Strand, in April, 1661, with leave to remain standing for one year. Pepys, when the arrival of the Queen Catharine of Braganza was hourly expected, notes in his Diary, May 25th, 1662, his being shown by Captain Ferrers, at the Triumph tavern, at Charing cross, some Portugal ladies, who had preceded Her Majesty. These maids of honour, as evidenced by Pepys, were not all Lucretias, nor were they in any way according to his taste. Evelyn too, though loyal to an extreme, when he records the queen's arrival on May 30th, had an eye to her ladies, whom he describes as " sufficiently unagreeable."


* That King James believed he richly merited the title, there is no disputing ; but it should be remembered his reign was a general acceptation of error for fact ; and he acquired the cognomen by a source not generally known. It was conferred on the Scottish king, by Henry the Fourth of France, on being apprized of his accession to the throne of England, in allusion to the believed paternity of David Rizzio. The French king had been too close an ally to England's late queen, and had received such substantial benefit from that alliance, that contempt, not respect, was the estimate of his affinity with the Stuart; yet his daughter, Henrietta Maria, became by marriage the daughter of King James the First, whose vaunting assertion of divine right in the crown, and her Catholicism, created ill fortune to these realms nearly the whole of the seventeenth century. Luckless in themselves as a family, they brought the same withering qualities with them into England ; and it is remarkable that the crown-ensconced head of James the First is rarely observable on any tavern or trader's token.

B537 Obverse. Edward . Bew . his . Halfe . Penny (in four lines).
R. at . charing . cross . 1664 = Bust of a queen crowned. 1/2

B538 Obverse. AT . THE . SENE . OF . THE = A harp.
R. HARP . AT . CHEREN . CROS = S . C. 1/4

B539 Obverse. O . Thomas . Cooke . at = Three sugar-loaves (?).
R. AGAINST . YE . MEWS = T . C. 1662. 1/4

B540 Obverse. Tho . Darling . at . 3 . tvns = Three tuns.
R. NEARE . CHARING . CROSS = T . D. 57. 1/4

“Then I to the Three Tuns Tavern, by Charing Cross, and there dined with
W. Pain, Sir J. Minnes, and Commissioner Middleton ; and as merry as my mind
could be that hath so much trouble upon it at home.”—Pepys’ Diary, Novem¬
ber 13, 1668.

B541 Obverse. Judeth . Elliss . 1664 (in three lines across the field).
R. AT CHARING . CROSS . HER . HALF . PENY = A horse-shoe. 1/2

B542 Obverse. the . Meremad . against = A mermaid.
R. THE . MVSE . GATE . l650 = W . A . F. 1/4

“ London , April 14.—His Majesty having been graciously pleased to Grant to
the Truly Loyall and Necessitous Officers, residing within the Bils of Mortality,
who have served him, and his Royall Father of blessed Memory, with great
Fidelity and Integrity in the worst of Times, One or more Plate-Lotteries, to be
Employed and Exercised within all parts of His Majesties Kingdom of England,
Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Twede, was pleased for the En¬
couragement thereof with his Royall Highness, and divers of the Nobility, to be
personally present on Monday last, at the Grand Plate Lottery, which by his
Majesties command was then opened, at the Sign of the Mermaid over against the
Mewes.”— The London Gazette, No. 356, April 12-15, 1669.

B543 Obverse. at . the . checker . inn = A checkered square.
R. AT . CHARING . CROSE = R . M . H. 1/4

“ On Saturday, Feb. 21, were stoln out of Mr. Bernards Grounds, at Bridgnorth . . . one bay Nag with all paces . . . : One black Gelding about 15 hands high, . . . Whoever gives notice of them . . . to Mr. Paul Rogers, at the Chequer Inne at Charing-Cross, shall have forty shillings for each horse.”—The Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 9, February 23 to March 2, 1662, p. 141.

“ A large motley-coloured French setting bitch spotted all over, only her ears red, about three years old, stoln out of a house from Black-heath, about the 29 of Ianuary last ; whoever brings notice of her to Mr. Paul Rogers, at the Chequer at Charing-cross, shall have twenty shillings for his pains .”—Mercurius Publicus, No. 5, January 30 to February 6, 1661, p. 77 ; and Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 6, February 3-10, p. 86.

B544 Obverse. MIDLETON . HARINTON . AT . Y . BLV = A bell.
R. AT . CHARING . CROSS.= M . A . H. 1/2

B545 Obverse. NEXT . TO . YE . WHIT . SWAN . IN = RICH. 1662.
R. NEAR . CHEARING . CROS = HAMMOND GROCER. 1/4

B546 Obverse. ANDREW . HIND . OVER . AGAINST = A hind.
R. the . muse . his . half . penny = A double-headed spread eagle. 1/2

B547 Obverse. Christopher . Jacob = Two men saluting.
BY . CHARING . CROSSE = C . I . I . 1/4

B548 Obverse. FRANCIS . JEFERIS . AT . THE = A Cross.
R. CHERIN . CROS . TAVERN = F . I. 1/4

B549 Obverse. at . Ye . Fethers . over = The Prince of Wales’s crest.
R. AGAINST . Ye . MVES = R . L. 1/4

B550 Obverse. miles . michell . at = The Cooks’ Arms.
R. CHARING . CROS . MEALMAN = M . I . M. 1/4

B552 Obverse. Thomas . Tonge . at . the = A lion rampant, holding a ball.
R. NERE . CHARING . CROSSE = T . E . T. 1/4

The following notice in the London Gazette, No. 234, February 10-13, 1667, possibly refers to this token and the preceding :
“These are to give notice, that the Post-house is removed from the Swan, near Charing-Cross, to the Red Lyon over against the Meuse-gate.”

B554 Obverse. Robert . wright . neare = Three birds.
R. CHERING . CROSS . 1664 = R . A . W. 1/4


CHARLES STREET.

B555 Obverse. Noah . Webb . Charles = A phoenix in the flames.
R. STREETE . AT . Y E . FENIX = N . M . W. 1/4


CHARTERHOUSE LANE.

Charterhouse lane is a perversion of Chartreuse lane.

#305 FRANCES BENTHAM Sun in rays, in field.
Rev. IN CHARTER . HOVS . LANE In the field, F. M. B.

The sun is an important symbol in the Distillers' arms the genial influence of which impels humidity to " drop as rain, distil as dew." Deuteronomy, ch. xxxii. v. 2. In the rare satirical frontispiece to the Elegy on the Death of Madame Gineva, 1736, the motto is ludicrously perverted to " cease to drop, distil no more."

#306 JOHN BUSH AT YE HARROW A harrow, in the field.
Rev. IN CHARTER HOUSE LANE HIS HALFE PENY.

#307 AT THE FLIEING HORSE Pegasus, in field.
Rev. IN CHARTER HOUSE LANE In the field, A. A. L.

The hippogriff Pegasus sprang from the blood of Medusa slain by Perseus. This winged horse flew to Mount Helicon, the seat of the muses, where with a stroke of his hoof he opened the fountain Hippocrene, called by the Roman satirist Caballinus, or the Horse's spring.
Bellerophon, becoming arrogant from prosperity, resolved by the assistance of Pegasus to ascend to heaven. As Horace says,
" In our folly we aim at Heaven itself;"
but Jupiter, to punish his presumption, struck him blind, and he fell to the earth ; Pegasus, however, continued to mount upwards, was translated to the skies, and ranked among the constellations. It is in this etherial flight Pegasus is most frequently represented on the tokens.

B560 A variety reads on reverse = his half peny.

#308 FRANCIS TURNER IN The Tudor rose crowned, in field.
Rev. CHARTERHOVS E LAN In the field, F. S. T.

B569 Obverse. FRANCIS . TURNER . IN = A rose and crown
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = F . S . T . 1/4

#309 JOHN HOWES AT CHARTR The Grocers Company arms .
Rev. HOUSE LANE END In the field, I. M. H.

B556 Obverse. Thomas . Barefoot . in = An angel.
R. CHARTERHOUSE . LANE = T . P . B. 1/4

B557 Obverse. Richard . Bennion . at . the = Three horses saddled and bridled.
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . A . B.

B561 Obverse. SAMUELL . DAWSON . AT . YE . = A horses head
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = his half peny. 67 1/2

B562 Obverse. JOHN . ELY . AT . YE . BOARES . HEAD = A boars head
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE 1668 = his half peny. 6

B563 Obverse. GREENE . MAN . AND . BALL = A man throwing a ball
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = T . S . F . 1/4

B564 Obverse. Richard . GREENE . in = St George and the dragon
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = R . E . G . 1/4

B567 Obverse. DUDLEY . MEARES . IN = A school boy
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = D. F. M . 1/4

B568 Obverse. CHRIS . SAMWORTH . AT . THE = A fountain, surmounted by a figure of Bacchus.
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = C . R . S . 1/4


B570 Obverse. FELIX . WAYLETT . IN = F . I . W .
R. IN . CHARTER . HOUSE . LANE = A lion rampant


Cheapside has moved

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As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

And Last updated on: Saturday, 01-Aug-2020 06:51:11 BST