Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Cheapside to Custom House quay

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.

CHEAPSIDE.

#310 AT YE MAREMAYD A mermaid, with her accessories.
Rev. TAVERN . CHEAPESIDE In the field, I. T. M.

The Mermaid in Bread street, the Mermaid in Friday street, and the Mermaid in Cheap, were all one and the same. The tavern, situated behind, had a way to it from these thoroughfares, but was nearer to Bread street than Friday street.

The steward's accounts of monies expended for Sir John Howard, subsequently Shakespeare's Jocky of Norfolk, afford the following notices in reference to the Mermaid in the olden day :

" November 5th, 1462. Item, my mastyr payd for t'on di. [i. e. the one half] off the dynner at the Mermayde, be my lordys comawndement xiiijs. vj d." My lord, here named, was John Mowbray, last Duke of Norfolk of that name ; he died in 1475.
" March 4th, 1463-4. Item, for vj of my mastyrs mannys soper in Bred stret,
" Item, the xxvj day of March, 1464, payd for wyn at the Mermayd in Bred stret, for my mastyr and Syre Nycholas Latemer, xrf. 6b."
Subsequently, when Sir John purchased empty wine-pipes for his carvel, then fitting for sea, these accounts show he obtained in September, 1468, twelve of them from the Mermaid, at " xc?. each."

Later, in the colophon to the rare volume entitled The Pastyme of the People, printed by John Rastell, brother-in-law of Sir Thomas More, it is said to be " emprynted in Chepeside, at the sygne of the Mearmayd next to Pollys -gate, 1529." This is coming more westward than is agreeable to the writer*. The entrance to the churchyard from Cheap was by a gate, called Paul's Gate, and the way there so straitened, that, when the pageants passed through Cheap, the larger signs were moved, and the posts at St. Paul's taken up, that they might enter the churchyard ; this is evidenced by frequent contemporary disbursements "for setting up the signs again," "for taking up of the spurres at St. Paules," and "for setting them againe," and "for paving," and "for gravell." Rastell's Mermaid next to Paul's gate, it is conclusive, had no reference to the tavern of that sign, apparently nearer to Bow church f.
Sir Walter Raleigh established a literary club at the Mermaid, in 1603, consolidating such a list of names as its members that at this distant period excite the liveliest feelings of admiration, reverence, and respect. Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Beaumont, Fletcher, Cotton, Carew, Martin, Donne, Selden, and others : what a galaxy of genius ! that no age has exceeded.

* The site of the Mermaid tavern is clearly defined, from the circumstance of  W. R., a haberdasher of small wares " 'twixt Wood street and Milk street," adopting the same sign, " over against the Mermaid tavern in Cheapside."

 Among other memorable taverns in Cheapside, either destroyed in the great fire, or, in the lapse of time and the vicissitudes arising from change of owners and other causes, now almost forgotten, was the King's Head. The setting of the city watch, or guardians of the night, was in the bygone day an affair conducted with considerable display, and was one of the most attractive public exhibitions in the metropolis. King Henry the Eighth, soon after his accession to the throne, having heard of this annual civic ceremonial, indulged his curiosity, by going, on the eve of St. John, June 23d, 1510, to the King's Head in Cheap, and there,
dressed in the garb of one of his own yeomen of the guard, bearing the halbert on his shoulder, saw unknown to all, with much gratification, the procession in its glorious array pass by. So delighted was the king with its effect, that on the following St. Peter's eve, on the setting of the second division of the watch, Henry and his queen Catherine of Arragon, the Infanta of Spain, and the widow of his elder brother Prince Arthur, rode royally attended by many nobles, from St. James's into the city, whence, after being much gratified, they returned in the morning. What a magnificent subject for a painting ; costume, period, history, and every point affording opportunity for the effulgence of artistic power.

The Mermaid is the subject frequently of a passing notice by contemporary writers ; Middleton, however, seems to have attempted the writing it down for the advancement of the Mitre ; the exciting cause is not expressed. In the first scene of the second act of his comedy, Yowr Five Gallants, written in 1608, there is this interlocution :

' ' Goldstone. Where sup we, gallants ?
Pwsenet. At Mermaid.
Goldstone. Sup there who list, I have forsworne the house.
Pursenet. Faith ! I'm indifferent.
Bungler. So are we, gentlemen.
Pursenet. Name the place, Master Goldstone.
Goldstone. Why the Mitre in my mind, for neat attendance, diligent boys,
and Push ! excels it far.
All. Agreed; the Mitre then."

This might have arisen from some personal squabble. The ( ' quarrels of authors" had their realities then as now, but that it was the arena of flashing satire and glowing racy witticisms, there is the assertion in the poetical letter to " the immortal Ben," from Beaumont, who died ere he had reached his thirtieth year, in March, 1615 :

" What things have we seen
Done at the Mermaid ! heard words that have been
So nimble, and so full of subtle flame,
As if that every one from whom they came,
Had mean'd to put his whole wit in a jest."

#311 AT THE MITRE IN CHEAP A mitre, in the field.
Rev. SIDE : FORGET NOT In the field, T. D.

" The Mitre in Cheape" is noticed anterior to 1475, in the parish records of St. Michael's, Cheapside. In the play of Sir Thomas More, Harl. MS. 7368, Robin says " Faith, Harrie, the head drawer at the Miter by the great conduite, called me up, and we went to breakfast into St. Anne's lane ;" an error that may baffle future commentators. The " great conduite" here alluded to was the western conduit, situated at the upper end of Old Change, and not the really great conduit, in the olden time, at the east end of Cheap. St. Anne's lane led from Foster lane to Aldersgate.
The third act of Wilkins's Miseries of Inforced Marriage, 1607, is laid at the Mitre tavern in Bread street ; the dolphin and pomegranate being there characterized as the chief company rooms. So in Middleton's A Mad World, my Masters, 1608 ; Sir Bounteous, pleased at the arrival of Folly- wit and his companions the players, who proffer to enact at his entertainment a pleasant witty comedy called " the Slip," exclaims " Why ! this will be a true feast, a right Mitre supper, a play and all !"

The Mermaid and the Mitre appear to have been rival taverns, both bearing indiscriminately the distinctive appellations of " the Mermaid in Bread street," and " the Mermaid in Cheape;" " the Mitre in Cheape," and " the Mitre in Bread street ;" they were evidently connected with these well-known thoroughfares by long entries, the Mermaid having also a passage or way to Friday street.

T. D, was possibly the issuer of the Mitre tavern token in 1649, or soon after, and relinquished it for " the Jackanapes," a neighbouring tavern ; Jackanapes lane being the eastern end of Paternoster row. Richard Smith, in his Obituary, Sloane MS. 886, notices, " June 4th, 1652, died Tho. Dainty, at the Jack-a- Napes, in Cheapside." If this surmise be correct, his successor at the Mitre was not long-lived, as the same record mentions, " May 17th, 1654, died Mr. Scattergood, vintner, at the Mitre, Cheapside."

The Mitre tavern was destroyed in the great fire of September, 1666 ; and the site appears to have been applied to other buildings. A William Paget established the Mitre tavern more westward, in Fleet street. The house was lastly Saunders's auction room, number 39, but was demolished by Messrs Hoares, to enlarge their banking-house, and the western portion now occupies the ground.

The now Mitre tavern, in Mitre court, Fleet street, formerly Joe's coffee-house, is but a recent assumption of name.

#312 AT THE BULL HEAD T A VERNE A bull's head, in field.
Rev. IN CHEAPSIDE . 1650 In the field, T. E. B.

#313 GEORGE PEARCE A bull's head, in the field.
Rev. IN CHEAPSIDE . 1665 In the field, G. M. P.

In the vestry minutes of the church of Allhallows, Honey lane, is a notice " Paid and given to one Crooke, the 3d of May, 1619, for his counsell concerning the parishes right or title in the Bull -head taverne, and the twoe houses adjoining theretoe, 01 : 02 : 0."

John Wilkins, subsequently bishop of Chester, began at Oxford, in 1649, an experimental philosophical club, that was held weekly, and was the incunabile of the Royal Society. Aubrey relates that ' ' when Wilkins came to London they met at the Bull -head taverne in Cheapside, from 1658, and after, till it grew too big for a clubbe, and so they came to Gresham Colledge parlour." letters, vol. ii. p. 583.

When the restoration was about taking effect, General Monk, on February 12th, 1660, according to Whitelocke, marshalled his forces in Finsbury, dined with the lord mayor, and having had conference with him and the court of aldermen, retired to the Bull Head in Cheapside, and quartered at the Glass-house in Broad street. Multitudes of people followed, congratulating his coming into the city, making loud shouts, bon -fires, and ringing of bells.

The Bull Head tavern was wholly destroyed in the great fire, in September, 1666.

#314 AT THE BLAKE BOY In field, a negro boy.
Rev. IN CHEPSIDE , 1 652 w. A. T., in the field.

#315 WILLIAM YATES Three keys, in the field.
Rev. IN CHEAPSIDE In the field, W. Y.   [William Yates]

The following advertisement, which appeared in the Parliamentary Intelligencer , No. 49, November 26 to December 3, 1660, is interesting as fixing the position of this issuer’s house :
“A low silver Tankard, containing about a pint, weighing between ten and eleven ounces, ingraven with P. O. on the fore-part of it, was stoln on Saturday last, the first of December , from Mrs. Oliver , at the seven stars, near the New Exchange in the Strand : If any one can give notice thereof to her, or to Mr. William Yates , at the three Keys at the lower end of Cheapside, he shall be well rewarded for his pains.”

#316 EZEKIELL WALLIS IN CHEAPSIDE, in field.
Rev. AT THE BLEW BOAR In the field, a boar.

Apothecaries adopted the sign of the Blue Boar.
James Stuart, the author of " Critical observations on the Buildings and Improvements of London/' 1771, 4to, observes ' ' With the multitude, habit sanctifies everything, and even that deformity to which they are accustomed becomes beauty in their eyes. When first the reformation in the streets began, the posts were defended to the last ; and the pulling down of the signs which choaked up and disgraced the streets was regretted as a barbarous invasion on the monuments of national taste : the Cat and Fiddle, Goose and Grid-iron, and the like, being regarded as the greatest efforts of inventive genius ; and Cheapside, often compared to the Medicean gallery, for its choice collection of paintings blue boars, green dragons, and king's heads."

#317 AGAINST THE GREAT Three tuns ; Vintners' arms.
Rev. COUNDUIT IN CHEAPSIDE In field, I. S. H.

The great conduit in Cheapside was in the road-way immediately opposite to Mercers' Hall.

#318 AT THE HALFE MOON A half-moon, in the field.
Rev. IN THE CORTE . 1658 In the field, S. A. M.

#319 EDWARD ATTWOOD A half-moon, in the field.
Rev. IN CHEAPSIDE In the field, E. I. A.

The Half-moon tavern was on the north side of Cheapside, abutting westward on Gutter lane, having a way by the court from Cheapside into Gutter lane. After the fire it was rebuilt, retaining the appellation of the Half-moon tavern. Elias Ashmole, in his Diary, March 11th, 1682, notices his presiding at the Half-moon tavern, in Cheapside, at a noble dinner prepared at the charge of some newly accepted masons: "I was the senior fellow among them, it being thirty-five years ago since I was admitted."
During a long series of years the Half-moon tavern maintained a distinguished notoriety, and is historically recorded as the scene of many public city events. As the property of the Saddlers Company it was leased by them to taverners till 1817, when Mr. Butler, chemist, became lessee of the premises, "heretofore the Half-moon tavern, but lately known as the New London tavern." A fire destroyed the whole in February, 1821, when the house now 140 Cheapside was rebuilt on the site. Half-moon passage, leading from Cheapside to the tavern, is now named Cooper's alley.


#320 THE MAN IN THE MOON Man within crescent, in field.
Rev. TAVERNE IN CHEAPSIDE In the field, S. S. T.

The generally entertained belief of a man in the moon is one of the earliest, as it is also one of the most widely spread, superstitions in the world. At all times he is described and represented leaning on a forked stake, bearing on his shoulders a bundle of thorns, or bush wood, and accompanied by a dog ; the idea evidently based on the story of the man found gathering sticks on a sabbath- day, as narrated in the fifteenth chapter of Numbers. Chaucer, in his Troilus, alludes to the proverbial expression in his time, of having a care " lest the chorle may fall out of the moone." There is also extant an early English ballad of five eight-line stanzas, in the Harl. MS. 2253, commencing

" Mon in the mone, stond ant streit,
On is bot-forke is burthen he bereth :
Hit is muche wonder that he na doun slyt,
For doute lest he valle he shoddreth ant skereth."

Shakespeare, in consonance with this popularly received tradition, makes Peter Quince, in the Midsummer Night's Dream, direct Moonshine to enact his part with a bush of thorn and a lanthorn ; this performer, having such accessories, subsequently declares

" This lanthorn doth the horned moon present,
Myself, the man i' th' moon do seem to be."

To this general acceptance, Demetrius altogether objects, requiring Moonshine, thorn-bush, dog and all, should be shoved into the lanthorn, " for they be in the moon." To most readers will also doubtless recur the incident of Stephano, in The Tempest, telling the surprised Caliban he had dropp'd out of the moon, and had been the man in the moon when time was ; an assertion to which the monster gives full credence, and affirms he had seen him there, with his dog and his bush.

#321 CHARLES KIFTELL A hand pouring coffee, in the field.
Rev. AT THE COFFEE HOUSE IN CHEAPSIDE . 1669.

One of the large brass size ; current for one penny.

B571 Obverse. GEORGE . ALLANSON = A cat.
R. .... CHEAPSIDE = Detrited

B573 Obverse. the . bull . head . taverne = A bulls head.
R. in. CHEAP . SIDE . 1650 = T . E . B. 1/4

B576 Obverse. JOSEPH . CLIFTON = HIS HALF PENY.
R. BULL . HEAD . YARD . CHEPSIDE = I . C. 1663.

It appears that General Monk made arrangements in February 1659-60 for quartering his troop here. — Vide Noble’s Memorials of Teniple Bar , p. 49.

B574 Obverse. FABIAN . BROWNE = A Castle.
R. IN . CHEAPSIDE = F . A . B. 1/4

B575 Obverse. the . featers . tavern = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. IN . CHEAPE . SIDE . 1650 = T . E . C. 1/4

B577 Obverse. against . the . great = St. George and the Dragon.
R. COVNDVIT . IN . CHEAPSIDE = F . M . D. 1/4

B578 Obverse. the . Diers . ARMES = The Dyers’ Arms.
R. IN . LITELL . CHEPSIDE =H . I . D.

B580. Obverse. KINGS . HEAD . UNDER . BOW = E . M . E.
R. CHURCH . IN . CHEAPSIDE =E . M . E. 1/4

B581. Obverse. Robert . Gardner = Three horseshoes.
R. IN . CHEAPSIDE = R . E . G. 1/4

B582. Obverse. Humphrey . Grosvenor = A horse’s head. [Nags Head ?]
R. IN . CHEAPSIDE = H . G. 1/4

B602. Obverse. Mary . Woodfall = A nag’s head.
R. IN : CHEAPE : SIDE = M . W. 1/4

B584. Obverse. Thomas . James . at . the = A raven.
R. UPPER . END . OF . CHEAPSID = T . B . I. 1/4

B596. Obverse. Richard . Royle . at . ye = A raven.
R, RAVEN . IN . CHEAPSIDE = R . R. 1/4

B585. Obverse. EDWARD . JARVIS . AT . THE . GEORG = St. George On horseback, killing a dragon.
R. in . cheapside . markett = Monogram, in ciphers, of Edward.

B588. Obverse. at . the . halfe . moon = A crescent-moon.
R. IN . THE . CORTE . l648 = W . H . B. 1/4

589. A variety is dated 1658, and has the initials S . A . M .
The house was used as headquarters by Freemasons in the reign of Queen Anne.

B590. Obverse. at . ye . mearemayd = A mermaid, with comb and glass.
R. tavern . cheapeside = I . T . M . 1/4

B592. Obverse. at . the . stare . tavern = A star of eight points.
R. IN . CHEAPSIDE . 1652= W . S . M. 1/4

B593. Obverse. Will . Mostyn . at . ye . hen = A hen and chickens.
R. CHICKINS . IN . CHEAPSIDE = W . E . M. 1/2

B595. Obverse. AT . Y E . MAREMADE . TWIXT . MILK . STRE . WOOD . STR = A mermaid.
R. HABERDASHER . SMALL . WARES . IN . CHEPSIDE = W . R with merchant’s mark. 1/2

B597. Obverse. AT . THE . STARE . TAVORN = A Star.
R. IN . CHEP . SIDE . 1648 = W . M . S. 1/4

B598. Obverse. William . Sharpe . in = A trumpeter on horseback, sounding a charge.
R. TRUMP . ALEY . CHEAP . SIDE = HIS HALF PENY.

B599. Obverse. the . man . in . the . moon = A man standing within a crescent.
R. TAVERN . IN . CHEAPSIDE = S . S . T. 1/4

B600. Obverse. at . the . blake . boy = A negro boy.
R. IN . CHEPSIDE . 1652 = W . A . T. 1/4

CHEAPSIDE MARKET.

#322 EDWARD JARVIS AT THE GEORGE St. George and Dragon.
Rev. IN CHEAPSIDE MARKETT Name in monogram.

One of the large brass size, for currency as a penny. Those pieces became most prevalent about 1670 ; and this is probably of, or about, that date. In 1668, Jarvis issued a half-penny token from the Sun in Foster lane.
Cheapside, or Honey-lane, market was the site of the parish church of All-hallows, destroyed in the great fire in 1666 ; the church not being again rebuilt.

John Norman, draper, lord mayor in 1453, was according to Stow's account buried here. With him originated the practice of going in procession by water to Westminster, on the morrow of St. Simon and St. Jade's day, having a stately barge built at his own expense, and the city companies building others for their communities in like manner : their previous cavalcades thus gave place to a triumphal solemnity on the Thames, to the great delight of the watermen, as commemorated by them in the ballad, beginning

" Row the boat, Norman, row to thy leman."
His ashes, if aught remained, were probably disturbed in the excavations for Carpenter's or the City of London School, in 1835 ; the market having been abolished for the ground. Pennies of the Anglo-Saxon period, a knife-blade enriched with gold, and other antiquities of the time, seen by the writer, were then discovered.

CHEQUER ALLEY (Moorfields).

B604. Obverse. John . Meekes . ye . dark . house = A checkered square.
R. IN . CHEQVER . ALLY . MOREFE 1 LDS = HIS HALFE PENY. 1668.

CHEQUER YARD (Dowgate).


B605. Obverse. H . Wellington . at . ye . coffe . hous = A hand pouring from a coffee-pot into a cup. H . W .
R. IN . CHECQUER . YARD . BY. DOWGATE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1665.


CHICK LANE, West Smithfield.

#323 AT THE GOULDING A lion rampant.
Rev. LYON IN CHIK LANE In the field, R. N. W.

#324 RICHARD HALLET Lion of St. Mark, in the field.
Rev. IN CHEK LANE . 1659 In the field, R. A. H.  1/4

#325 RICHARD LUKEY AT THE Pump, with hand attached.
Rev. PUMP IN CHICK LANE In the field, HIS HALFE PENNY. R. M. L.

B614. Obverse. Richard . Lukey . at . the = A pump, with a hand grasping the handle, and another holding a mug to the spout.
R. PUMP . IN . CHICK . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . M . L.

B606. Obverse. William . Brattle . at . the = Three crowns on the royal oak.
R. ROYAL . OAK . IN . CHICK . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . E . B. J

B607. Obverse. Thomas . Cowly . in . chick = The sun in rays.
R. lane . his . half . peny . i666 = T. M . C conjoined.

B608. Obverse. Peter . English . at . the = A shoulder of mutton.
R. in . chick . lane . 1668 = his half peny, and the Baptist’s head in a dish.

B609. Obverse. Jarvis . Garnon . at . ye . corner = A wheatsheaf.
R. OF . CHICK . AN . FEE . LANE = I . G. 1/4

B610. Obverse. Rachell . Goulsmith = The Salters’ Arms.
R. IN . CHICK . LANE . 1665 = CHANDLER. 1/4

B612. Obverse. Thomas . Johnson . in = The Salters’ Arms.
R. CHICKE . LANE . 1658 = T . I. I. 1/4

B613. Obverse. Henry . Knight . brewer = A still and three other objects.
R. IN . CHICK . LANE . 1669 — HIS HALF PENY. H . E . K.


B615. Obverse. JOHN . MASON = I . M.
R. IN . CHICK . LANE = A Still. 1/4

B616. Obverse. Richard . Rawlinson = The Bakers’Arms.
R. IN . CHICK . LANE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY.

B617. Obverse. ALEXANDER . SHARP = A . I . S.
R. in . chicke . lane = Three pipes. 1/4

“ Whereas a Person calling himself George Brown, about 25 years old, . . . got into his hands by a forged Letter, . . . the sum of 200/. of the King's Mony , at Kingstone upon Thames, and went away with it on a little black Nag about 9 hand high, . . . Whoever shall give effectual notice of the person above mentioned . . .
to Mr. Alexander Sharpe, at the 3 Tabacca-Pipes in Chick-lane, shall have five pounds for his peyns, or 20s. if he take the Nag only.”—The Nezves, No. 60, August 3, 1665, p. 675.

B619. Obverse. Robert . West . 1667 = The Mercers’ Arms.
R. IN . CHICKE . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . A . W.


CHISWELL STREET, Finsbury.

#326 BARTHOLOMEW FRANCIS An arched crown, in the field.
Rev. IN CHISWELL STREET . 1666 HIS HALFE PENNY.

#327 AT THE PLOVGH In the field, a plough.
Rev. IN CHESEL STREET I. F. T., in the field.  1/4

B620. Obverse. Edward . Adams . at . y e . lamp = A light burning in a lamp.
R. IN . CHISWELL. STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1669.

B621. Obverse. RALPH . BOWES . IN = l658.
R. CHISSELL . STRET . BREWER = R . M . B. 1/4

B622. Obverse. ROBERT . CHIPPERFIELD = 1659.
R. IN . CHISSELL . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B623. Obverse. ROBERT . CHIPPERFEILD = 1659.
R. IN . CHISSELL . STREET = R . A . C. 1/4

B624. Obverse. RICHARD . FEILDING = R . E . F.
R. IN . CHESSON . STREETE = 1659. 1/4

B626. Obverse. William . Panton (in two lines across the field).
R. in . chisell . street = A leg in a boot. 1/4

B627. Obverse. Jonathan . Smith . oyleman = A lantern, with four flambeaux projecting from the sides.
R. IN . CHISWELL . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B629. Obverse. Bryan . Tailor . at . gree = A man holding a staff and a horn.
R. MAN . CHISELL . STREET = B . A . T. 1/4

B630. Obverse. John . Thomlinson . at . the = Robin Hood, fitting an arrow to his bow; Little John behind, holding an arrow.
R. IN . CHISWELL . STREET . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . S . T.

“ It is easy to see what is intended by the representation on the obverse of this token. Though ‘ Little John,’ we are told, stood upwards of six good English feet without his shoes, he is here depicted to suit the popular humour—a dwarf in size, compared with his friend and leader, the hold outlaw. The proximity of Chiswell Street to Finsbury-fields may have led to the adoption of the sign, which was doubtless at a time when archery was considered an elegant, as well as indispensable, accomplishment of an English gentleman.”—Akerman’s London Tradesmen's Tokens.

B631. Obverse. Stephen . Wilkinson = Much worn. r> R.R. IN . CHISWELL . STREETE = S . L . W. 1/4


CHRIST'S HOSPITAL, Newgate Street.

#328 JOHN BANNISTER AT THE MATRONS A cripple, in field.
Rev. SELLER IN THE HOSPITALL HIS HALFE PENNY.

B633. Obverse. John . bannister . at . the = Same device as the last.
R. MATRONS . SELLER . IN . THE = HOSPITALL. 1/4

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, Sloane MS. 886, having recorded the burial of Mrs. Banister of Lad lane, and her daughter Pointer, both buried in one grave, April 18th, 1653 ; notices the decease, on January 5th, 1654, of old Mr. Banister, in Lad lane, who was possibly the issuer of this token. On February llth, 1669, Smith again minutes "died Henry Banister, porter of Christ's Hospital."


B634. Obverse. Sibbil . theame . Christ = A shoe.
R. ASPETAL . SHO . MAK ER = S . T. 1/4


CHURCH LANE.

#329 RICHARD SMITH HIS HALFE PENNY, in the field.
Rev. IN CHURCH LANE . 1665 In the field, R. E. S.

#330 JOHN STONYER IN King David with the harp, in field.
Rev. CHYRCH LANE . 1658 In the field, I. M. S.  1/4

Stonyer's token is engraven among the tradesmen's tokens of St. Giles's parish, in Parton's History of that parish, p. 386.

B635. Obverse. James . Hasler . at . the = A trumpeter on horseback.
R. IN . CHURCH . LANE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY.

B636. Obverse. AT . YE . GENERAL . MVNKES = W . R . M.
R, Head . in . Church . lane = Full-faced bust of Monk. 1/4

B637. Obverse. Edw . Scales . at . the . sun . in = The sun in rays.
R. CHURCH . LANE . NEAR . WEL . CLOS = HIS HALF PENY. E . E . S. 1669.

B640. Obverse. THOMAS . WEEDEN . IN . CHURCH = A Sugar-loaf.
R. LANE . IN . WHITE . CHAPPEL = T . M . W. 1/4


CHURCHYARD ALLEY, Tooley Street.

#331 WILLIAM BARNES . 1665 In the field, object illegible.
Rev. CHYRCH YARD ALLEY TOOLEY STREET.

#332 JOHN COX . IN CHURCHED ALLY IN SOYTHARK . HIS HALFPENY.
Rev. THE PVMP RVNS CLEER : WHALE AND BEER A hand-pump

ThThe inscription on the obverse, in seven lines. That on the reverse is an apparent perversion of the couplet

" Yet a verse may run cleare
That is tapt out of beere."

Histrio-Mastix, a comedy, 1610, 4to.

CHURCHYARD GATE, Westminster.

#333 ED : ROGERS . SALTER . 1659 A horse, in the field.
Rev. CHURCHYARD GATE.WESTM Fishmongers' arms.


CLARE MARKET, Lincolns Inn Fields.

JoJohn Holies, second Earl of Clare, had licence in 1642, to build the market, named by him Clare market, and opened in 1656. Ho well, noticing the improvements in his time, observes, " Then is there towards Drewry lane, a new market, called Clare market, a street, and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of, Clare, who lives there in a princely manner, having a house, a street, and a market, both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." Londinopolis, 1657, fol. p. 345.

The city authorities appear to have successfully opposed, for some years, the establishment of this market, from the following extract :

"The City and my lord Clare had a great law-suit, that lasted many years, to the great expense of the city ; but, from the iniquity of the times, the city and my lord agreed, and the city gave it up to my lord, and now it is become one of the greatest markets in the adjacent parts ; and, from the success of this noble lord, they have got several charters for the erecting of several other markets, since the year 1660 ; as that of St. James, by the Earl of St. Alban's ; Bloomsbury, by the Earl of Southampton ; Brook market, by the Lord Brook ; Hungerford market; Newport market; besides the Haymarket, New Charing Cross, and that at Petty-France, at Westminster ; with their May fair, in the fields behind Piccadilly." Harl. MS. 5900. The earl died in 1665.

#334 WILLIAM BIRTBY . IN CLARE Fishmongers' arms. r> Rev. MARKETT. FISHMONGER HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

#335 IEREMIAH GREEN AT YE King's head; Charles II.
Rev. KINGS HEAD IN CLAR[E] MARKETT In the field, HIS HALFE PENY. I. A. G.

#336 ROBERT MYNN AT YE GOLDEN Anchor, with R. M.
Rev. ANCHOR . IN NEW MARKETT HIS HALFE PENNY.

CLARE STREET, Clare Market.

#337 RICHARD ANDREWS AT THE A fountain. 
Rev. IN CLARE STREET NEW MARK? HIS HALFE PENNY.


#3#338 HUM : MUNTT . IRONMONGER Three candlesticks, in field.
Rev. IN CLARE STREET. 1666 HIS HALFE PENNY.

Clare Market, so named from its founder, John Holies, Earl of Clare, is frequently called New Market, having been established only a few years before the issue of these tokens ; this mak'es it difficult to distinguish them from those of Newmarket in Suffolk, which see. Holies Street, Peter Street—properly Denzell Street—and Vere Street, in the neighbourhood of Clare Market, are placed under separate headings.

B643. Obverse. William . Birtby . in . clare = The Fishmongers’ Arms.
R. MARKETT. FISHMONGER = HIS HALLE PENNY. 1667.

B644. Obverse. Roger . Francklin . at . the = A lion rampant.
R. IN . CLARSTREET . HOASSIAR = HIS HALF PENY. R ... F.

B645. Obverse. HENRY . FRANCIS . AT . THE . 2 . KINGS = A Still between two kings crowned, standing, holding sceptres.
R. AND . STILL . IN . NEW . MARKET . 67 = HIS HALFE PENNY. H . E . F.

B646. Obverse. Jeremiah . Green . at . ye = Bust of Charles II. crowned.
R. KINGS . HEAD . IN . CLAR . MARKET = HIS HALFE PENY. I . A . G.

B647. Obverse. George . Tavern . in = St. George and the Dragon.
R. CLARE . STREETE . 57 = G . I. 1/4

B648. Obverse. TERTULLION . LEWIS = A Salt-box.
R. CLARE . STREET . SALTER = T . G . L. 1/4

B650. Obverse. THOMAS . M... IN = T . M . M (?).
R. NEW . MARKET . STREETE = T . M . M. 1/4

B651. Obverse. Adam . Pearson . in . beare . yard = A hat and feather.
R. NERE . NEW . MARKET . AT . YE . BLEW . CAP = HIS HALFE PENY.

“ If any Goldsmith or other Person, hath bought a Black Cane of one Joynt, with a Handle of Gold and a Ferril of the same, taken out of a House in Queen street, let them bring it to . . . Mr. Fierceson's house neare the Beare, in New-market, and they shall receive their Money, and a good Gratuity for their paines.”
—The Kingdom's Intelligencer , August 19-26, 1601, p. 537 1 and the Mercurius Fublicus , No. 39, August 22-29, 1661, p. 536.

B652. Obverse. JOHN . RENOB . COFFEE = 1 D.
R. HOVSE . IN . NEWMARKET = 1 . R.

B653. Obverse. George . Sampson . Clare . stret = Samson in a wig, with an ass’s jawbone in his hand.
R. NEW . MARKET . HIS . HALF . PENY = A Still. G . P . S.

B654. Obverse. GEORG . SAMPSON = A Still.
R. IN . CLARE . STREET = G . S. 1664 1/4

B655. Obverse. RALPH . SHERWIN . AT . SWAN = A Swan.
R. IN . CLARE . MARKETT . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . A . S.

B656. Obverse. John . Walker . in . new . market = The Fishmongers’ Arms.
R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = I . I . W.


ST. CLEMENT'S, Strand.

#339 THE CASTEL TAVERN IN A castle.
Rev. S. CLEMENT CHURCH YAR In the field, I. I. ; third letter illegible.

#340 THE CASTEL TAVERN IN A castle.
Rev. S. CLEMENT CHURCHYARD In the field, I. A. P.  1/4

B2468. A variety has the initials I . P. 1/4

B2469. A second variety reads :
Obverse. THE . CASTELL . TAVERNE = A Castle.
R. IN . S . CLEMENT . DAINES = I . P. 1/4

B2470. A third variety reads S . clement, has the rd of yard conjoined, and has the initials I . I .P.  1/4

Behind ST. CLEMENT'S CHURCH, Strand.

#341 Y ANGEL BACK SIDE An angel, in field. 
Rev. OF ST. CLEMENTS. [16] 57 In the field, S. L.

B2471. Obverse. ye . angel . back . side = An angel.
R. OF . ST . CLEMENTS . 57 = T . S.  1/4

The Angel, a long-established traveller's inn. In the Plwmpton Correspondence is a letter from York, dated February 6th, 1503, addressed " to Sir Richard Plompton, knight, being lodged at the Angell behind St. Clement kirk, without the Temple barr, at London."

Latterly seven or eight mail coaches were nightly dispatched from the Angel inn ; but the rail-roads absorbed the business, and, for the last eight or ten years, the freehold, the property of a family named Watson, has been on sale for 8000 l. It has recently been purchased for 6800?., and the buildings rased in August 1853. A builder's speculation: and chambers similar to those of an inn of court are now being erected.

The following advertisements give the issuer’s name Stanton, and show that he kept an inn, from which coaches ran to Salisbury :

“ Stoln from Captain William Clarke of Southstonham nigh Southampton in Hampshire a brown bay mare . . . . : Whoever can bring Newes of the said mare
to Mr. Stanton at the Angel Inn at the back-side of St. Clients .... shall have 40 shillings for their pains .”—Mercurius Publicus , No. 22, May 29—June 5, 1662, p. 348.

“ At the Angel at the Backside of St. Clements , you may have a Coach, thrice a week (vizi) Mondays , Wednesdays , and Fridays, to go to Sarum , in Two days, and so from the Angel in Sarum , Three times a week upon the same days for London. This is to be performed by Ralph Rooksby , and Michael Minchin of Sarum .”—The Newes, No. 20, March 10, 1663, p. 165 ; and No. 24, March 24, 1663, p. 199.

#342 Abraham Jorden at ye [Turk's head] his i, in four lines.
Rev. behind St. Clements church . 1664, in four lines.

B2457. Obverse. EDWARD . GEERY . IN . ST . CLEMENTS = E . L . G.
R. CHURCH . YARD . BROKER . l667 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

ST. CLEMENT'S (Strand).

The entrance of St. Clement's lane, at "the back of St. Clement's," is admirably pourtrayed in an etching by J. T. Smith, entitled ' ' Old Houses in the Butcher row," as they appeared previous to demolition in March, 1798.

#343 RICH. CHIDLEY.IN CLEMENT Tobacco-roll, and R. B. C., in the field.
Rev. LANE . NEARE NEW MARKETT HIS HALFE PENNY. 1666.

The upper end, next Clare market, is here implied ; it was in the immediate neighbourhood of the theatre in Gibbon's tennis-court ; and also that in Portugal row, Lincoln 's-inn fields ; hence its fitness of situation for a tobacconist.

B2453. Obverse. Tho . Clark . in . ST . Clemens = Three neat’s tongues.
R. LANE . IN . EASTCHEAP = T . S . C. 1/4

B2454. Obverse. Christopher . Danbrook = A hand pouring coffee into a cup.
R. IN . ST . CLEMENTS . LANE = HIS HALF PENY.

B2455. Obverse. at , the , 3 . Tunnes . in = Three barrels.
R. S . CLEMANES . DENES = T . A . F. 1/4

B2456. Obverse. Ric : Fuller . in . St . cle = A half-moon.
R. MENTS . NEARE . LYONS . IN — R . F. 1657. 1/4

B2458. Obverse. Ia . Goles . white . horse = A horse.
R. BACKSIDE . S T . CLEMENTS  = I . D . G. 1/4

B2459. Obverse. Lewis . Harrindine . in . ye . back = An artichoke.
R. SIDE . OF . ST . CLEMENTS . LACE . SHOP = L . B . H.

The artichoke was often used as a sign by milliners.

B2460. Obverse. Philip . Johnson . at . the = A paschal lamb.
R. BACK . SIDE . OF . ST . CLEMENTS = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1665.

“If any man can give notice of a light Dun Mare with a bald face, and four white feet, black mane and tail, a lock of white hairs in her tail, about seven years old, and about fifteen hand high, that was taken out of a Stable in Coale Yard on Thursday August 30. by a young man .... If any one apprehend him, and give notice at the Holy Lamb on the backside of St. Clements, they shall have five pound for their pains.”— Mercurius Publicus , No. 36, August 30— September 6, 1660, p. 572.

B2461. Obverse. Abraham . Jorden . at . ye . his . 1/2 D . (in four lines). A Turk’s head.
R. behind . St . Clement . Church . 1664 (in four lines).

B2462. Obverse. AT . THE . SHIP = A Ship.
R. IN . CLEMENTS . LANE = M . A . K. 1/4

B2463. Obverse. Geo . Laurance . meal = A wheatsheaf.
R. AGA t . CLEMENTS . CHV = G . M . L. 1668.

B2465. Obverse. LAWRANCE . LEWES . IN . YE . BACK = L . I . L. 1668.
R. SIDE . ST . CLEMENTS . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY.

B2466. Obverse. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD = A full-faced bust of Henry VIII.
R. IN . CLEMENTIS . LANE = E . A . N. 1/4

B2472. Obverse. YE . COFFEE . HOVSE . AGAINST = W . E . S.
R. ST . CLEMENTS . CHVRCH . STRAND = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2473. Obverse. at . the . whit . lyon = A lion rampant.
R . IN . S . CLEMENTS . LANE = W . M . S. 1/4

B2474. Obverse. IOH . SMIT . CLEMONS = A dog.
R. LANE . W T . OVT . TEMPLE . BAR = I . I . S. 1/4

B2475. Obverse. John . smith . at = St. George and the Dragon.
R. IN . ST . CLEMENTS . LANE = I . W . S. 1/4

B2476. Obverse. THO . SPRINGELL . AT . THE = A Castle.
R. BEHIND . S T . CLEMENTS = HIS HALFE PENNY. J

B2477. Obverse. Frances : WALKER = A heart pierced by two arrows, within a crowned ring.
R. AT . CLEMENT S . WEL . L = F . W. 1/4


CLERKENWELL.

#344 CHRISTOPHER BVSBEE AT A lion passant regardant.
Rev. YE WHIT LYON IN ISLINGTON HIS HALF PENY. 1668.

Brathwaite, in his Barnabee's Journal, written before 1650, on his homeward course from Mother Redcap's at Holloway, notices his progress
" Thence to Islington at Lion,
Where a juggling I did spy one,
Nimble with his mates consorting,
Mixing cheating with his sporting ;
Creeping into th' case of 'a viall
Spoil'd his juggling, made them fly all."

So in the same writer's Whimzies: or a New Cast of Characters, 1631, in that of " a painter," is another allusion : " My lord maiors day is his jubilee, if any such inferior artist be admitted to so serious a solemnity : if not, country presentments are his preferment ; or else, hee bestowes his pencile on an aged peece of decayed canvas in a sooty ale-house, where Mother Redcap must be set out in her colours. Here hee and his barmy hostesse draw both together, but not in like nature; she in ale, hee in oyle. But her commoditie goes better downe, which he meanes to have his full share of, when his worke is done. If she aspire to the conceit of a signe, and desire her bircJi-pole pull'd downe, he will supply her with one ; which he performes so poorely, as none that sees it but would take it for a signe he was drunk when he made it. A long consultation is had, before they can agree what signe must be rear'd. A meere-maide, sayes shee, for that will sing catches to the youths of the parish. A lyon, sayes he, for that 's the onely signe that he can make ; and this he formes so artlessly, as it requires his expression this is a lion. Which old Ellenor Rumming, his tap-dame, denies, saying, it should have been a meere-maid."

Although described in the token as "in Islington," the White Lion inn stood on the Clerkenwell side of the high street from the Angel inn to what is now the Liverpool road. The house appears to have been rebuilt in 1714 ; but a portion was pulled down to make an opening to White Lion row, built between 1770 and 1780, now called White Lion street. The sign, a lion rampant, with the date, 1714, remains in front of one of the houses. See Cromwell's History and Desmption of Clerkenwell, 1828, duod. p. 390.

Busby's Folly, a house of entertainment, marked in the old maps of Clerkenwell, and of which there is a characteristic engraving in the Divers Views, 1731, 8vo., possibly originated with the issuer of this token.

B657. Obverse. Christo . Anderton . at . ye = A crown. C . A . A.
R. AT. CLERKENWELL. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY.

B658. Obverse. THOMAS . BROWNE . AT . THE = A Sugar-loaf.
R. IN . CLERKENWELL . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T. E . B.

B659. Obverse. ye . rose . and . crowne . in = A rose and crown.
R. CLARKENWEL . CLOSE = A . E . C. 1/4

B660. Obverse. Henry . Daniel . at . the = Daniel in the lions’ den.
on . clarken . wel . grene = A horse’s head. 1/4

B661. Obverse. Thomas . Gibs . in . clerken = Bust of Charles I. crowned.
R. WELL. FEILDS . l666 = HIS HALFE PENY.

B662. Obverse. Tristram . Hewes . at . 1666 = His Halfe Peny.
R. Clarkenwell . baker = The Bakers’ Arms, between T . A . H.

B663. Obverse. Tristrump . Hewes = A pair of scales.
R. AT . CLARKENWELL . BAKER = T . A . H. 1/4

B664. Obverse. Edward . Pinckethman = Five bells.
R. IN . CLERKENWELL . CLOSE . [l6]68 = HIS HALFE PENY. E . A . P.

B665. Obverse. JOHN . ROBERTS . AT . YE . DRVM = A drum.
R. IN . CLARKENWELL . GREENE .= HIS HALFE PENNY. I . E . R.

B666. Obverse.GILES . RVSSELL . IN = A Swan.
R. CLARKENWELL . 1657 = G . M . R. 1/4

B667. Obverse. JOHN . SCOTT . AT . THE . TVRN . STILE = A turnstile.
R. AT . CLARKENWELL . GREENE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B668. Obverse. RICHARD . STVDLEY . AT . THE = SHROPSHIERE HOUSE.
R. IN . CLARKEN . WELL . CLOSE = R . I . S. 1/4

B669. Obverse. EDWARD . WRIGHT . BAKER = 1658.
R. CLARKENWELL . GREENE = E . D . W. 1/4



CLINK STREET, Southwark.

#345 lohn Rollings in ClinJce . Street, in script characters.
Rev. HIS HALF PENY Green or wild man, bearing club. r>
Octagonal. The green man, as he was termed, was at this period an indispensable object in the civic pageantries : the Orson of our day, bearing, like Hercules, a huge club.

CLOAK LANE, Dowgate Hill.

#346 AT THE WILLOW TREE In the field, a willow tree. r> Rev. IN CLOAKE LANE I. P. B., in the field.

#347 AT THE WILLOW TREE In the field, a willow tree.
Rev. IN CLOAK LANE N. I. B., in the field.

See also No. 871.


CLOTH FAIR, Smithfield.

#348 WILLIAM WITTINGAM A winged dragon, in the field.
ReRev. IN CLOTH FAIRE . 1657 In the field, W. D. W.

#349 HENRY INGERSOVLE Bakers Company arms, in field. r> Rev. IN CLOATH FAIRE . [16]58 In the field, H. D. I.

#350 HENRY INGERSOLE AT YE 3 Vintners' arms, in field.
Rev. TVNNES IN CLOATH FAIRE In the field, HIS HALFE PENNY. 1668.

The baker appears to have turned vintner ; or the second token might be that of his son.

#3#351 RICH : TAYLER . MEALE R. T., in field.

Rev. MAN . IN CLOTH FAIER In the field, the same initials.

#352 RICHARD GIM BART Two draymen, with barrel on sling.
Rev. IN CLOTH FAIER In the field, R. M. G.

Gimbart's, and a few other tokens of what may be termed good work, are distinguished by a heart, in place of mint-mark.

#353 THOMAS HARLOW. CHANDLER T. A. H., 1669, in'field.
Rev. OVER AGAINST Y^ BREWERS In the field, IN CLOTH FAIRE.

Coale Staires, see SHADWELL, No. 985.

B672. Obverse. Christo : Ashbourn . at . the = The sun.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAIR . CHANDLER = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B673. Obverse. William . Bincks . at . the . 2=Two men carrying a barrel on a pole.
R. BREWERS . IN . CLOATH . FAIRE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1666.

B674. Obverse. William . Chandler = Two hands joined.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAIRE = W . S . C. 1/4

B675. Obverse. HENRY . CRANE . IN = H . E . C.
R. CLOTH . FAYRE . 66 = MEALMAN. 1/4

B676. Obverse. Tho . Cranfeild = A fox.
R. IN . CLOTH . FAIRE = T . S . C. 1/4

B677. Obverse. Henry . Downing = The Mercers’ Arms.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAYRE = H . R . D. 1/4

B678. Obverse. WILLIAM. FAWSON = HIS HALFE PENNY.
R. in . cloath . faire . 667 = W . F and a flower.

B679. Obverse. Thomas . Gascoyne = The Merchant-tailors’ Arms.
R. in . cloath . faire . 1668 = his | half | peny (in three lines).

B681. Obverse. William . Gray . i666 = A pair of antlers.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAIRE = HIS HALF PENY.

B682. Obverse. THOMAS . HARLOW . CHANDLER = T . A . H. 1669.
R. OVER . AGAINST . YE . BREWERS = IN CLOTH FAIRE.

B683. Obverse. William . How . at . ye . harro = A harrow.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAIRE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . E . H.

B686. Obverse. James . Miller . 1666 = A patten and last.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAYRE = HIS HALFE FENNY.

B687. Obverse. Isack . Peckett = Three stags.
R. in . cloath . faire = The Butchers’ Arms. 1/4

B688. Obverse. John . Poyntiing . in . Cloath . faier (in four lines).
R. His . Half . Penny , a tobacco roll and 1667. {Heart- shape. )

B690. Obverse. Mikhill . Temple = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. IN . CLOATH . FAIRE = M . A . T. 1/4

B691. Obverse. George . Wallis = The Tallowchandlers’ Arms.
R. IN . CLOATH . FEIARE = G . W. 1/4


COCK ALLEY, Without Ludgate.

Among the city improvements authorized by the Act of Parliament obtained in 1760, was a passage forty feet wide, through Cock alley on Ludgate hill, opposite to the Old Bailey, into Black Friars. This has not taken effect.

#354 HENRY MORICE AT THE BLACK DOGG In the field, ID
Rev. IN COCK ALLEY . NEAR LVDGATE A spaniel dog.

The Black Dog, on the south side of Ludgate hill, was the house frequented by the dramatists and players belonging to the Blackfriars theatre, that stood in Playhouse yard ; the immediate site of the theatre being since occupied or built on, for the back premises of Apothecaries' hall.

COCK LANE, Smithfield.

355 RICHARD NORMAN IN Bakers Company arms, in field.
ReRev. COCK LANE . BAKER In the field, R. I. N.

B695. Obverse. Robert . Greene = A fleur-de-lis.
R. IN . COCK . LANE . 165 6 = R . D . G. 1/4

B696. Obverse. Richard . Norman . in = A wheatsheaf, and a pair of scales.
R. COCK . LANE . BAKER = R . I . N. 1/4

B697. Obverse. Charls . Oakes . at . ye . SUGER = The King’s head, and three crowns on the royal oak. c . d . o.
R. LOAFE . IN . COCK . LANE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B698. Obverse. O. the . Green . Lettice = A latticed square.
R. IN . COCK . LANE = I . D . S. 1/4

THE COCK PIT.

B699. Obverse. John . Scott . at . ye . cock . pitt = A crown above a cock.
R. SUTTLER . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = I . M . S.


COCK LANE, Shoreditch.

#356 THE COCK AT COCK In the field, a game cock.
Rev. LANE END . IN SHORDICH T. C. A., in the field.

COCK'S now COXE'S QUAY, Lower Thames Street.

#357 CHRISTOPHER BOSTOCK In field, a cock and a key.
Rev. AT COCKES KEY. 1669 HIS HALF PENY, C. A. B., in the field.

COLCHESTER STREET (Goodman’s Fields or Great Tower Hill).

B700. Obverse. thomas . peerwyre = A talbot.
R. IN . COLCHESTR . STREET = T . S . P. 1/4


COLE HARBOUR, Thames Street.

#358 HENRY COOPER AT THE Horns and draymen, in field.
Rev. COLE HARBER . THAMS STRET HIS HALF PENY.

Messrs Calvert's brewery now occupies the site of Cole Harbour ; and recently, on the east side, abutting on the Red Bull wharf.

#359 THOMAS KNIGHT AT YE DYERS Dyers Company arms.
Rev. ARMES IN COLE HARBER HIS HALFE PENY. T. E. K.

B705. Obverse. Thomas . Kinge . at . ye . dyers = The Dyers’ Arms.
R. ARMES . IN . COLE . HARDER = HIS HALFE PENY. T . E . K. 1/4

#360 LANCELOT CHAPMAN Innholders arms, in the field.
Rev. AT COAL HARBOR In the field, L. M. C.  1/4

B700. Obverse. Andrew . Ellies = The Vintners’ Arms.
R. IN . COLEHARBER . GAT — A . S . E. 1/4

B704. Obverse. Andrew . Ellis . at = The Dyer’s Arms.
R. AT . COLE . HARDER . GATE = A . S . E. 1/4

These two are possibly variant descriptions of the same token.



COLEMAN STREET.

#361 JOSEPH SIBLEY AT YE BLACK A bell, in the field.
Rev. IN COLMAN STREET . 1663 A HALF PENEY.

Query, if the house referred to by John Taylor the waterman poet, in his Carriers' Cosmographie, 1637, 4to : " The carriers of Cambridge doe lodge at the Bell in Coleman street; they come every Thursday."

#362 NICHOLAS HARINTON AT A hind, in field.
Rev. YE HIN[D]E IN COLEMAN STREET HIS HALFE PENEY. 1665.

The imprint to a volume, entitled the Lithotomia Vesicce, of Hildanus, " printed for William Harris, at the sign of the White Hinde in Coleman street, 1640,"
8vo, 'shows that Harris either had, as a shop, a part of the tavern, or that, subsequently to 1640, the White Hind became a house of public entertainment.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, notices the burial of a previous occupant : " August 6th, 1658, Mr. Robert Dawkes, innkeeper at the White Hinde in Coleman street, a constant appearer on juries, buried."

White Hind alley derived that name from the sign of this tavern.

B706. Obverse. JOHN . ABBUTT . l666 = HIS HALF PENY.
R. in . colman . STREETE = The Drapers’ Arms.

B707. Obverse. Samuell . Colman . at = A sugar-loaf and crescent.
R. CORNER . COLMAN . STREET = S . A . C. 1/4

B708. Obverse. Edward . Fletcher = The Carpenters’ Arms.
R. AGAINST , COLEMAN . STR = E . M . F. 1/4

B709. Obverse. Rob . Forde . grocer = A mermaid.
R. IN . COLEMAN . STREET = R . F. 1/4

B710. Obverse. James . Gripp . liveing = A coat between I . G.
R. IN . COLEMAN . STREET . 1666 = A COAT MAKER. I . E . G.

B712. Obverse. Nicholas . miller . at . the = A star of eight waving points.
R. TAVERN . IN . COLEMAN . STREET = N . M.

B713. Obverse. John . Sheldon . in . swan . aly = Three inkhorns.
R. IN . COLEMAN . STREET . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

Venner, the wine-cooper, a mad enthusiast, held forth doctrines so subversive of
all government at the conventicle in Swan Alley, that an insurrection followed,
and as the leader, he was, on January 19, 1661, at Swan Alley end in Coleman
Street, hanged, drawn, and quartered.—[B.]


COLLEGE HILL (Thames Street).

B715. Obverse. FRANCIS . TROWELL= 1664.
R. ON . COLLEDGE . HILL = F . T.


CONDUIT LANE, Dowgate.

#363 DAN. BVRRY WOODMONGR A woodland gate, in field.
Rev. CONDIT LANE AT DOWGATE In field, D. M. B.

The woodmongers, when seaborne coal was not so generally used, had their stores, for the most part, at the wharves in Thames street and the neighbourhood, and sold their billets to the consumer by the score or number. That they cheated like other traders is evident ; but when detected, their punishment was summary in effect, and in the way of example singularly disgraceful. Machin, in his Diary, mentions, " September 17th, 1561, a woodmonger dwelling beside the Red Bull, beyond Cold Harbour, in Thames street, was set in the pillory, near the Cross in Cheapside, with billets hanging about him, for false marking of billets."

CORNHILL.

Cornhill was for centuries the mart of clothing and household furniture, caused by the contiguity of its situation to the braziers of Lothbury, the great manufacturers of kitchen utensils ; to the tailors and linen-armourers of Coleman street and the neighbourhood, the exclusive makers of both linen and woollen clothing ; and to Lombard street, then the residence of foreign merchants.

#364 AT THE SEVEN STARS In the field, seven stars.
Rev. IN CORNHILL . 1648 M. I. W., in the field. 1/4

King Charles the First was beheaded January 30th, 1649, but as the year did not commence till March 25th, this, like all other tokens dated 1648, was struck during the following month, February, or in the next before March 24th, 1649. There are but few tokens of this date, and that few very scarce.

#365 THE MERMAID TAVERN In field, a mermaid with attributes.
Rev. IN CORNHILL . 1651 W. M. T., in field.

Boniface Tatam [Qu. Tatham?] of London, vintner, buried in the parish of St. Peter, Cornhill, the 3d of February, 1606, " gave forty shillings yearly to the
parson for preaching four sermons every year, so long as the lease oi the Mermaid in Cornhill (the tavern so called) should endure. He also gave to the poor of the said parish thirteen penny-loaves every Sunday, during the aforesaid lease."

In Ben Jonson's Devill is an Asse, played in 1616, act iii. sc. 1, Meercraft reproaches Everill for " haunting the Globes and Mermaids ;" Gifford, his commentator, vol. v. p. 80, intimates that " the Globe was on Bankside, the Mermaid tavern in Cornhill." In this, though rarely in error, Gifford's reference should have been to the Mermaid in Cheap.

When Dun, who kept the Mermaid tavern in Cornhill, being in a room with some witty gallants ; one, who it seems knew his wife, too boldly, in a fantastic humour, cried out " I'll lay five pounds, there's a cuckold in this company?"
" Tis Dun!" said another. Coffee House Jests, 1688, duod., p. 182.

#366 THE 3 GOLDEN LYONS Three lions passant gardant.
Rev. IN CORNHILL . 1660 In the field, s. C[ADE.]

The Three Golden Lions, a charge borne in the royal arms of England, originated in the armorial insignia of William the Norman, who bore gules, two lions, or leopards, passant-gardant in pale, or. Henry the Second bore the same till about two years before his accession ; when, upon his marriage with Eleanor, daughter and heiress of William Duke of Aquitaine and Guyenne, he added to his own her arms, gules, a lion passant-gardant, or, the arms of King Henry the Second being gules, three lions passant-gardant, or; and although these lions or leopards denote the territories of Normandy, Poictou or Maine, and Aquitaine, no part of which now belong to, or are possessions of, the Crown of England, they remain as the insignia of the greatest monarchy in Christendom.

The Three Golden Lions appears not to have been a tavern in the reign of Charles the First. Weemses's Portraiture of the Image of God, 1632, 4to, is on the title said to be " printed for John Bellamie, and sold at his shop, at the signe of the Three Golden Lyons, in Cornehill, neere the Koyall Exchange."

[Cade is his stationer, living in Cornhill, by the Change! He is mentioned as such, several times.]
The taverner's name was Cade. Pepys, in his Diary, June 1st, 1665, records " walked to Cornehill, and there at Mr. Cade's stood in the balcon, and saw all the funeral [of Sir Thomas Viner, sheriff in 1648, and lord mayor in 1654], with the blue-coat boys and old men, all the aldermen, lord mayor, and others. The number of the company very great ; the greatest I ever did see for a taverne."

The token was probably struck on the opening of the house as the Three Golden Lions tavern, in 1660, a supposition arising from the imprint on the title of the Life of Ignatius Jurdain, Alderman of Exeter, 1655, 16mo, "printed for Thomas Newberry, and are to be sold at his shop, at the Three Golden Lions on Cornhill, by the Royal Exchange;" or, as Pepys states he saw the procession from the balcony, the booksellers' shops here noticed were possibly on the ground-floor. Many of the most frequented taverns were at this time on the first-floor.

Bowles's View of the Mansion-house, 1751, exhibits a rich display of the signs and sign-irons as then exhibited in the Poultry, Cornhill, and Lombard street.

Union in Cornhill, see EXCHANGE ALLEY, No. 441.

##And additional detail from Boyne Tradesmen tokens#

B717. Obverse. AT . THE . BEARE . TAVERN = A bear.
R. IN . CORNHILL . 1656 = R . W . D. 1/4

B718. Obverse. the . ship . and . starr = A ship with a star above it.
R. IN . CORNHILL . 1657 =T . I . E. 1/4

The issuer of this token was one Thomas Ewster, a stationer, as appears from the following advertisement :
‘ Stoln upon the First Instant ... a flea-bitten Nag, about 14 hand high. . . . Whoever shall give notice of him ... to Mr. Thomas Ewster , a Stationer at the Ship in Cornhill , shall have 20s. for his peyns.”—
The Newes, No. 56, July 14, 1664.

B719. Obverse. at . the . dolphin = A dolphin.
R. TAVERN . IN . CORN . HILL = H . A H. 1/4

B720. Obverse. AT . YE . BLACK . BULL = A bull.
R. IN . CORN . HILL = T . M . H. 1/4

B721. Obverse. AT . THE . CASTLE tavern = A castle.
R. IN . CORNE . HILL 1651= A . F . T . H. 1/4

B722. Another reads on the reverse, in the field, T . H. 1/4

B723. Obverse. O. Robert . Halton = A man seated holding a cup, into which a servant is pouring coffee.
R. IN . CORNHILL = R . E . H. /4

B724. Obverse. WILL . HINTON . AT . YE . GOLDEN = A fleece.
R . ON . CORNE . HILL . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 1/2

“To the Fleece in Cornhill by appointment, to meet my Lord Marlborough, a serious and worthy gentleman, who, after doing our business about the company, began to talk of the state of the Dutch in India, which is like to be in a little time without any controll ; for we are lost there, and the Portugese as bad.”—Pepys’ Diary, January 29, 1663-4.

“ Lost on the 15 Instant from the Anchor in Budge-Rozv, a Negro Boy twelve years old, a scar on one cheek, in a sad coloured Cloth Suit and coat. Whoever shall give notice of him to Mr. Hinton , at the Fleece Tavern , in Cornhill, shall be well rewarded for his peyns.”—
The Newes, No. 30, April 20, 1665, p. 251.

This shop seems to have been kept at one time by a certain Robert Carrington.
“ Lost, the 14 instant, in the afternoon, A white Dimety Bag. ... If any shall bring tydings of them to Mr. Robert Carrington, Linnen Draper, at the Golden Fleece in Cornhill, near the Exchange in London . . . they shall receive good satisfaction for their pains .”—
Mercurius Publicus, No. 7, February 12-19, 1662, p 105
This tradesman is called Kerington in the Kingdom's Intelligencer , No. 44, October 28 to November 4, 1661, p. 696.

B725. Obverse. John . Lvcas . at . the . dolphin = A dolphin and a boar. I . M . L.
R. TAVERNE . IN . CORNHILL = HIS HALF PENY. 1/2

B726. Obverse. AT the . golden . cross = A shield of arms on a cross.
R. IN CORNHILL . 1649 = R . V . R. 1/4

Vide Nos. 418, 983, and 1406, London ; and the token of Anne Michell, in Chichester.
The issuer of this very early token was one Roger Rea. He and his son were booksellers and stationers, as appears from the following advertisement. There are very few “ booksellers’ ” tokens known.
“ An Advertisement of a Book.”

“ All Maps set out by John Speed of the Counties of England , Scotland , Ireland and Wales, with Prospects of all the most famous Posts of the World, Sold formerly by Sir William Humble , late of Popes-head-Alley, with the Book of Maps at large and history, with the Epitomies, etc., are now sold by Roger Rea the elder, and the younger Stationers at the Guilt Cross in Cornhill, near Pope’s-head Alley, London.”—
Mercurius Publicus, No. 41, October 9-16, 1662, p. 683 ; also
in the Kingdom's Intelligencer , No. 42, October 13-20, 1662, p. 691, et al.

B727. Obverse. John . sweeting = The Mercers’ Arms.
R. ON . CORNEHILL = I . S. 1/4

B728. Obverse. AT . THE . LIVE . VVLTER = A vulture.
R. IN . CORNHILL = W . K . T. 1/4

B731. A variety reads on the reverse “cornhill . London” without a date.

Vide Nos. 2308, 2728.

B732. Obverse. GAMA . WHITTAKER . AT . YE = A Sugar-loaf.
R. IN . CORNEHILL . GROSER = G . W. 1/4


COUNTER LANE, Southwark.

#367 SAMUEL SMITH In the field, the initials M. S. S.
Rev. IN COVNTER LANE IN SOVTHWARKE.

Counter lane is now Counter street, leading from the western side of St. Margaret's hill to Stoney lane and the Borough Market.

By an error of the die engraver, the initials are M. S. S. for S. M. S.


COUSIN LANE (Upper Thames Street).

B733. Obverse. DAN . BURRY . WOODMVNGR = A gate.
R. CVZEN . LANE . AT . DOWGAT = D . M . B. 1/4

B734. Obverse. John . Marte . in . cuzen = A large ball.
R. LANE . THAMES . STREET = I . M. 1/4

B735. Obverse. PETER . TVLL . WOODMON = A plough.
R. GER . IN . COZEN . LANE = P . A . T. 1/4

COVENT GARDEN.

B736. Obverse. O. WILLIAM . CLIFTON . AT . THE = A fleece.
R. FLEECE . IN . COVENT . GARDEN = W . C. 1

B737. Obverse. AT . THE . FLEECE . TAVERNE = A fleece.
R. IN . COVEN . GARDEN = W . C. 1/4

William Clifton, at the Fleece Tavern, on the west side of Bridges Street, appears on the rate-book, 1651.
The churchwardens’ accompts, 1656-7, notice a disbursement of 26s., “for mending the grate over the sewer by the Fleece Tavern.”
He appears to have been the chief taverner, and in the rate-book of 1657 he is rated at 26s. ; while Long, at the Rose, was assessed at bnt 13s., only half the amount.
The churchwarden’s accounts for the year ending at Easter, 1658, mention a payment, on April 12, “ to Mr. Clifton, 3/. 13J., for wine for the last yeare.”
The burial register of 1658 records, on November 12, the interment of “ Mr. Clifton’s man;’’ and on March 21, 1660-61, “Thomas, sonne of William Clifton.”
The burial register of St. Paul’s notices, September 13, 1672, the consigning to the earth of “ Amey Watis, Mr. Clifton’s servant and again, on February 26,
1675, “ Widow-More, from the Fleece.” The parish clerk has left a blank with a memorandum, that he did not “lerne her Christian name.”

Aubrey says “ in York Street but, if so, there must have been a back, or second way to the Fleece, as the tavern appears by the rate-books to be about six houses down, south of the corner of Bridges Street and Russell Street.—[B.]

“ . . . . Old Mr. Flower and another gentleman, who tell us how a Scotch Knight was killed basely the other day, at the Fleece in Covent Garden, where there had been a great many formerly killed.—Pepy’s Diary , December 1st, 1660.

“ Stoln from a house in York-street, about the Twentieth of November last, a looking-glasse, about thirty inches long, and twenty inches broad ; the frame of it is carved, an Eagle on the top of it, and gilded with hurnisht gold. And a piece of gilt leather hangings, black and gold, with bost Flowre Deluces and Crowns, three yards long, and two broad or thereabouts. If any can bring tydings of them to Mr. Clinton, at the Fleece Tavern in Covent Garden, shall have 40s.”

This advertisement appeared in the Kingdom's Intelligencer, December 16-23, 1661, p. 785, and December 23-30, 1661, p. 798 ; and in the Mercurins Publicus,
No. 52, December 19-26, 1661, p. 800.

B738. Obverse. WILLIAM . FARNCOMBE = OYL MANE 1654.
R. IN . COVENT . GARDEN = W . F. 1/4

William Farncombe appears on the rate-book of 1657, in Bedford Street ; and in the burial register, February 3, 1660-61, is recorded the interment of “ William,
son of William Farncombe.”

The name again occurs in the assessment-book of 1663.—[B.]

B739. Obverse. the . cros . keyes . tavern = Two keys crossed.
R. IN . COVENT . GARDEN = G . G . G. 1/4

The Crossed-keys Tavern appears to have been in Bedford Street, between Henrietta Street and King Street.
George Gascoigne’s name is noticed in the rate-books of 1657 ; but he was doubtless an older inhabitant, as in the burial register that commences October 27, 1653, are recorded in April 24, 1654, the sepulture of Debora Gascoigne, and on May 8, Dorothy Gascoigne. The burial of George Gascoigne, the issuer of the token, follows on January 23, 1660-61.—[B.]

The following advertisement, however, which appeared in the Mercurins Publicus," in 1661, p. 268, seems to show that this tavern was in Henrietta Street :

“ John Herbert . . . hath stolen . . . from Sir Edward Hungerford, of Farley Castle, in the County of Somerset, as many Oxen and other Cattel (which he hath sold) as amounted to near the value of 1,000/. If any one make discovery of the aforesaid person, or secure him, and give notice thereof unto Mr. John Staley, Goldsmith, living over against the Crosse-Keys Tavern, in Henrietta-street, in Covent Garden, they shall have 20/. for their pains.”

B740. Obverse. at . the . rose . tavern = A full-blown rose. [Rose tavern, Russell street, Covent Garden]
R. IN . COVEN . GARDEN = W . M . L. 1/4

William Long appears in the rate-books, 1651 and 1657, among the assessed on the east side of Bridges Street; and in the burial register he is noticed as buried in the churchyard, August 5, 1661.

His widow, Mary Long, issued a token as from Russell Street. Her name is on the rate-book, 1663, assessed at 12s., and the Theatre Royal, 40s. Her burial is recorded in the parish register: “Jan. 29, 1673-4, Mary Long, widow.” Their place of sepulture was in the north-west ground, behind the houses in King Street. The headstone recorded William and Mary Long as the parents of twenty-four children. (See “Maitland,” vol. ii., p. 665.) Nothing of the stone is now known.
The Longs continued the tavern, which, from its contiguity to the theatre, and close connection with it, became the vortex of libidinism, and was frequented by court bullies, literary men of loose character, and other gentry of no character at all.
Hogarth’s third print of the “ Rake’s Progress,” published in 1735 » exhibits a principal room at the Rose Tavern. Leathercoat, the fellow with a bright pewter dish and a candle, is a portrait ; he was for many years a porter attached to the house. Garrick, when he enlarged Drury Lane Theatre, in 1776, previous to which it was little better than a barn, and raised the front designed by Robert Adam, took in the whole of the tavern as a convenience to the theatre, and retained the sign in an oval department, a conspicuous part of the decoration, as shown in the engraving by J. T. Smith.—[B.]

Pepys’ Diary , February 3, 1663-4 :

“ In Covent Garden to night, going to fetch home my wife, I stopped at the great Coffee-house there, where I never was before ; where Dryden the poet (I knew at Cambridge), and all the wits of the Town, and Harris the player, and Mr. Hoole of our College.”

Hereon Mr. Mynors Bright quotes from “ The Town,” by Leigh Hunt :

“We turn out of Bow Street into Russell Street. At the north-east corner of the two streets was the famous Wills’ Coffee-house, formerly the Rose, where Dryden presided over the literature of the Town.” “ We out again to the Rose Taverne, and there I did give them a tankard of cool drink, the weather being very hot.”—Pepys’ Diary , May 13, 1668.

B741. Obverse. at . the . rose . and . crown = A rose crowned.
R. IN . COVENT . GARDEN = V . M . M. 1/4

B742. Obverse. John . Minchin . baker . ob . [obolus] (in four lines).
R. in . covent, garden . 1664 = An angel.

B743. Obverse. John . More . in . bridge = A crowned rose.
R. STREET . IN . COVEN . GARDEN = HIS HALFE PENNY.

The notoriety of the Rose Tavern appears, after the death of William Long, to have created an opponent in this rival Rose.
John Moore, in the rate-book, 1663, assessed at but 4s. 4d., follows so closely after Clifton that his Rose was apparently between the Fleece and York Street.
Query, whether the widow- More, who died in 1695, noticed in the note on P- 575 . was the widow of John More, and successor to Clifton at the Fleece.—[B.]

B744. Obverse. ELLEN . PRICK . IN . B (OW . ST ?) = A bush. br> R. IN . COVEN . GARDEN . 59 = E . P. 1/4

B745. Obverse. FEARE . GOD . HONOR . YE . KING = A Bible.
R. IN . COVENT . GARDEN . 58 = W . S. 1/4

Vide Appendix.

William Sheares, bookseller, at the Bible, in Bedford Street, Covent Garden, in 1661, as a frontispiece to some of his publications, prefixed an engraving of his sign, a Bible, with W. S., surrounded by the motto : “ feare god . honor the king,” as on the token.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, has a notice: “Sept. 21st, 1662. Mr. Sheires, bookseller in Covent Garden, buried.” Where does not appear; his name is not in the parish register.
Margaret Sheares is found in imprints, three or four years later. The burial register of St. Paul, Covent Garden, records : “ March 26, 1673. Mrs. Margaret Sheares buried.”—[B.]

B746. Obverse. ROBERT . WHITE . IN . BRIDGE = A windmill.
R. STREET . COVENT . GARDEN = HIS HALFE PENNV. R . E . W.


COW CROSS, St. John's Street.


#368 AT THE 3 KINGS In the field, H. M. G.
Rev. AT COWE CROSS The three kings, crowned.

B753. Obverse. JOHN . GOLBARNE . AT . THE = I . M . G.
R. Worlds . End . cow . cross = A globe, on which is represented land and water, trees, etc., with clouds at the side. 1/2

#370 JOHN HAMMOND CHEESMONGER, in field.
Rev. AT cow CROSS . 1667 A pile of cheeses, I. H., in the field.  1/4

B747. Obverse. the . dogg . and . bare = A dog attacking a bear.
R. AT . COW . CROS . 1653 = I . M . B.

B748. Obverse. Francis . Bray . at . cow = Three fleur-de-lis.
R. crosse . his . half . peny . 66 = F . B. divided by an ornamented knot. 1/2

B749. Obverse. RICHARD, Burchmore = A wheatsheaf.
R. AT . COW . CROSSE = R . M . B. 1/4

B750. Obverse. William . Cordwell = A kneeling figure surrounded by wild beasts (Daniel in the lions’ den ?).
R. AT . COW . CROSS = W . A . C. 1/4

B752. Obverse. the . 3 . doves = Three doves, each holding a branch in its beak.
R. AT . COW . CROSE . 1650 = 1 . M . G. 1/4

B755. Obverse. Phillip . Hocker . at . the = Two men about to kill a bull.
R. AT . COW . CROSS . 1664 = P . M . H. 1/4

B756. Obverse. Elizabeth . Hodgkins . at . the = A lion rampant.
R. RED . LYON . COW . CROSS . 65 = HER HALFE PENNY.

B757. Obverse. AT . THE . SIGNE . OF . THE = A boot-last.
R. LAST . AT . COWE . CROSSE = T . I . M. 1/4

B758. Obverse. JOHN . MARTINE . AT . Y E . RED = HIS HALFE PENY.
R. Cross . at . cow . crose . 1666 = A cross.

B759. Obverse. William . Richardson = The Fruiterers’ Arms.
R. AT . COW . CROSSE = W . H . R. 1/4

B760. Obverse. the . white . lion = A lion rampant.
R. at . cow . crosse = A large S. J. 1/4

B761. Obverse. James . Watkins . at . the = An arched crown.
R. CROWN . IN . COWCROSSE = I . I . W. 1/4

B762. Obverse. John . Wood . at . the = A sugar-loaf and crescent be¬ tween two pistols.
R. AT . COW . CROSS = I . G . W. 1/4

B763. Obverse. John . WORMWELL = The Prince of Wales’s Feathers.
R. AT . COWCROSSE = I . S . W. 1/4


COW LANE, Smithfield.

Stow, describing the encroachments on Smithfield in 1598, mentions, among
new buildings, " Cowbridge street, or Cow lane, which turns toward Oldbourne."

#371 JOHN BEARD AT THE A bull's head, in the field.
Rev. BULL HEAD . IN COW LANE In the field, I. L. B.  1/4

#372 AT THE PLOW In the field, a plough.
Rev. IN COW LANE C. A. T., in the field.  1/4

#373 WILLIAM HOLMS AT THE A plough, in the field.
Rev. PLOW IN cow LANE In the field, W. A. H.  1/4

The female initial being the same, probably a second husband.

#374 AT THE RED CROSS A cross, in the field.
Rev. IN COW LANE [16]58 In the field, T. A. T.  1/4

#375 JOHN WERREN In the field, a still.
Rev. IN COW LANE I. S. W., in the field.   1/4

B765. Obverse. John . Collis . in = A naked figure holding a staff.
R. COW . LANE . 1657 = I . A . C. 1/4

B766. Obverse. ELIZ . GODDARD . AT . THE = A dragon.
R. DRAGON . IN . COW . LANE = E . G. 1/4

B767. Obverse. JAMES . HILL . AT . THE = A bull’s head.
R. IN . COWE . LANE = I . M . H. 1/4

B769. Obverse. AT . THE . SHIPE . AT = A ship.
R. COW . LANE . END = I . S . R. 1/4

B770. Obverse. the . 3 . cocks . at = Three cocks.
R. COW . LANE . END = R . I . S. 1/4

B771. Obverse. WILLIAM . STRINGFELLOW . AT = HIS HALFE PENY.
R. ye . bull . head . in . cow . lane = A bull’s head couped.

B774. Obverse. the . shvger . lofe = A sugar-loaf.
R. AT . COWE . LANE . END . 1652 = W . M . T. 1/4

B775. Obverse. Thomas . Tarat . in . boars = The Bakers’ Arms.
R. HEAD . COVRT . COW . LANE . END = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B776. Obverse. John . Thorowgood . at . cow = A spur with its leathers.
R. LANE . END . IN . SMITHFEILD = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . R . T .



CREE-CHURCH LANE, Leadenhall Street.

#376 WILL. CLARKE . CHANLER In the field, W. A. C.
Rev. NERE CREE CHURCH Same initials, in the field.

#377 THE GATE SHEAF IN CREE An oat-sheaf, in the field.
Rev. CHURCH LANE . CHANDLER In field, R. M. B. |.

#378 EDWARD SHRAWLEY AT THE CROWN A crown, in field.
Rev. IN CREE CHURCH LANE . 1669 HIS ID  E. I. S.

Large brass size, struck for the currency of a coffee-house penny.

B784. Obverse. Edward . Shrawly . at . y e . crown = An arched crown.
R. IN . CREECHURCH . LANE . 66 = HIS HALF PENY. E . I . S.

B780. Obverse. at . the . bull . head = A bull’s head.
R. BY . CRECHURCH . 1653 = 1 . I . C.

B781. Obverse. JONATHAN . CLEREDGE = A bull’s head.
R. BY . CREE . CHURCH . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . C.


CREED LANE (Ludgate Hill).

B785. Obverse. thomas . green . at . y e . three = Three pigeons.
R. PIGEONS . IN . CREED . LANE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B786. Obverse. tho . newbery . cheesmonger = A cheese-knife, T . S . N .
R. Ye . LOWER . END . OF . CREEDE . LANE = HIS HALFE PENY. 1669.

CRIPPLEGATE WITHIN and WITHOUT.

Cripplegate immediately faced the end of Little Wood street ; it was sold by the commissioners of the city lands, July 30th, 1760, for 911., and demolished in the following month.

#379 THOMAS ASHLEY . 1666 Open arched crown, in field.
Rev. WITHIN CRIPPLE . GATE HIS HALF PENY.

#380 JAMES HAYDYE . WITHOVT Three storks, in field.
Rev. CRIPPLEGATE . POVLTERER HIS HALF PENY. I. S. H.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, Sloane MS. 886, records "August 4th, 1669, Mr. Heddy, poulterer in Fore street, buried at Cripplegate; Mr. Welbank, preacher."

B787. Obverse. ROBERT . AMY . AGAYNST = A grasshopper.
R. CRIPPLGATE . CHURCH = R . P . A. 1/4

B789. Obverse. WILL . BARNES . AGAINST = W . M . B.
R. CRIPELGATE . CHURCH = OYLE SHOP. 1/4

B790. Obverse. THO . CORNEL . MILNNR = T . M . C.
R. AT . CR1PLEGATE . CHURCH = 1657. 1/4

B791. Obverse. WILL . CROSLAND . AT . Y E . BLEW = A bell.
R. WITHIN. CRIPPLEGATE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY.

B792. Obverse. AT . THE . WHIT . HYND = A hind.
R. BRVHOVS . AT . CREPLE . GATE = G . F. 1/4

B793. Obverse. JOHN . FLETCHER . GROCER = I . A . F. 1 669.
R. NEXT . DOOR . TO . YR . SUN . TAVERN = WITHIN CRIPLE GATE 1/2 D. (Heart-shape?)

B794. Obverse. Tho . Greenhill = Three birds.
R. CRIPLEGATE . WITHOUT = T . M . G. 1/4

B795. Obverse. at . the . sunne . tavern = The sun in splendour.
R. AT . CRIPPEL . GATE = I , E . H. 1/4

This tavern was afterwards kept by one Dan Chidley.
“His House is like his Liquors, neat and clean.”— A Vadetnecum for Maltworms, part ii., p. 10.

B797. Obverse. ISAAC . HODGKIN . AT . THE = A SUn.
R. WITHOUT . CRIPLEGATE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B798. Obverse. EDWARD . PHIPPS . AT . THE = A COCk.
R. WITHOUT . CRIPPLEGATE = HIS HALFE PENNY. E . S . P.

B799. Obverse. Job . Sargeant = A harrow.
R. WITHIN . CRIPLEGATE = I . S. 1/4

B800. Obverse. THO . SPENCER . AGAINST = 1658.
R. CHURCH . CRIPPLEGATE = T . T . S. 1/4



CROOKED LANE, Cannon Street.

#381 THOMAS OGDEN AT YE A swan, in the field.
Rev. IN CROOKED LANE . 1664 HIS HALF PENY.

B801. Obverse. Thomas . Cole . tallow = A stick of candles.
R. CHANDLER . IN . CROOKED . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. 1669.

B803. Obverse. at . the . 3 . crickets = Three crickets, i.e., stools.
R. IN . CROOCKED . LANE = I . A . S. 1/4

B804. Obverse. Joseph . Shelley . at = A fleur-de-lis.
R. IN . MILES . CROOKED . LANE = I . E . S. 1/4

CROSS-KEY COURT (London Wall).

B805. Obverse. George . Higginson . in . cross = The Clothworkers’ Arms.
R. KEY . COVRT . NIGH . LONDON . WALL = HIS HALFE PENY. G . K . H.

CROUCHED or CROSSED FRIARS, Mark Lane.

The scene of Haughton's humourous comedy of Englishmen for my Money, written in 1598, but not printed till 1616, 4to, is laid in Croched Friars; where Pisaro's daughters, Marina and Mathea, because their father's house " had never a signe at the dore," contrive to suspend their rejected Dutch lover in a basket, to supply in his person that want.

382 HUMPHRY MILLINGTON A horse-shoe, in the field.
Rev. IN CRUTCHED FRYERS HIS HALF PENY.

The adoption of the horse-shoe as a sign had more in the intention than is generally supposed it was an invocation to good luck, or success ; and had reference to a protective power against witches ; as Gay expresses it

" The horse-shoe's nail'd, each threshold's guard."

Mason, in his Anatomie of Sorcerie, 1612, 4to, mentions, among omens of good luck, " if drink be spill'd upon a man, or if he find olde iron." To find a horseshoe, and nail it below the threshold of the door, was, according to Ramsay's Erninihdogwb, p. 76, a certain means of keeping witches in doors, as well as keeping them out. The practice seems founded on the custom among the Romans of driving nails into the walls of cottages, generally believed to be an antidote against the plague ; for this purpose L. Manilius, A. U. C. 390, was named dictator, to drive the nail.

Thetis, in James Lord Scudamore's Homer a la Mode, a travesty of the first two books of Homer's Iliad, printed in 1664, describes Jove's house, as one

" he hath by leasehold,
With horse-shoe nail'd upon the threshold."

And Dr. Barton Holiday, in his comedy, entitled Texnogamia: or the Marriage of the Arts, 1610, 4to, proffers, with other good wishes to the reader, one, in which the writer heartily concurs " May the horse-shoe never be pulled from your threshold !" In other words may your good fortune never fail you.

#383 AT THE SHIPPE A ship, in field.
Rev. IN CRUCHED FRIERS In the field, W. C. B.

#384 THO: GREENE AT THE Crossed keys, in field.
Rev. IN CRUCHED FRYERS . [16]67 HIS HALFE PENNY. T. I. G.

The Crossed Keys, or keys in saltier, is a very common bearing in the insignia of sees and religious houses, more especially those that pretend to be under the patronage of St. Peter, the patron saint of the Romish church.


B808. Obverse. AT . THE . BLACKE . BULL = A bull.
R. IN . CRUCHED . FRIRS = I . M . B.

B810. Obverse. Tho : Greene . at . the = Two keys crossed in saltire.
R. IN . CRUCHED . FRYERS . 67 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T . I. G.

B811. Obverse. at . the . 3 . tun . tavern = Three tuns.
R. IN . CRUTCHED . FRIERS = I . E . K.

“ In our street, at the Three Tuns Tavern, I find a great hubbub ; and what was it but two brothers had fallen out, and one killed the other. And who should
they be but the tw r o Fieldings, one whereof, Bazill, was page to my Lady Sandwich ; and he hath killed the other, himself being drunk, and so is sent to
Newgate.”—Pepys’ Diary , May 9, 1667.

Vide No. 813 for another token issued from this house.

B813. Obverse. at . the . 3 . tunnes . in = Three tuns.
R. CRUCHED . FRIARS = T . M . P.

B814. Obverse. WILLIAM . SARGANT = MEALMAN.
R. in . crutched . friers = A bunch of grapes.

B815. Obverse. Philip . Starkey . at . ye = The Brewers’ Arms.
R. IN . CRUCHED . FRYERS = P . M . S.

B816. Obverse. Francis . Woodward . in = A trumpeter on horseback.
R. CRUCHED . FRYERS . I 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. F . E . W.


CROWN COURT, Little Russell Street.

385 IOHN SPICER . IN CROWN COURT A crown, in field. Rev.
IN RUSSELL STREET . 1667 HIS HALF PENY ; a lute.

Possibly a lutenist, or musician, from its being so near to the theatre royal in Riding-house yard, Drury lane. The token may indicate the sign of one of the many music-houses in that part of the metropolis at this period.

B806. Obverse. Thomas . Burnham . in . Croivne . Court . in (in four lines).
R. Russell . Street . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). ( Octagonal.).



CURRIERS' ALLEY, Shoe Lane.

#386 AT THE BIRD IN HAND Hand, holding a bird, in field.
Rev. IN CVRRIERS ALLEY In the field, I. A. W.


CURSITOR'S ALLEY, now Cursitor Street.

#387 RICHARD HILL IN Man dipping candles, from tallow vat.
Rev. CVRSSITORS ALLY . In the field, R. M. H. .  1/4

B818. Obverse. John . Gale . in = A sugar-loaf.
R. CURSETERS . ALLEY = I . E . G.  1/4

B820. Obverse. AT . THE . ROSE . TAVERN . IN = A full-blown rose.
CUSSITERS . ALLEY . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . E . S.

B821. Obverse. at . ye . rose . tavern . in = A rose on a stalk.
CUSSITERS . ALLEY . 57 = I . E . S. .  1/4

B822. Obverse. ANTHONY . YEWEN . IN . CUSATER = A goat.
ALLY . NEARE . CHANCERY . LANE . HIS . HALFE . PENNY. A . I . Y (in five lines).


CUSTOM-HOUSE QUAY. See also Water Lane.

#388 ARTHUR BALDWIN AT HIS HALF PENY, in the field.
Rev. THE CVSTOM HOUSE KEY In the field, A. I. B.

B824. Obverse. Joseph . Drew . at . the . blak = A negro smoking.
R. BOY . ON . CUSTOM . HOUSE . KAY = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . D. A

B825. Obverse. HENRY . HALFORD . OVRE = A horse.
R. AGAINST . YE . CUSTOME . HOUSE = H . E . H.   1/2

B826. Obverse. at . the . taverne . NERE = Bust of a queen.
R. THE . COVSTVM . HVSE = S . E . T.   1/4

B827. Obverse. Thomas . Whitbread = A man dipping candles.
R. BY . Y E . CUSTOME . HOUSE = T . E . W.   1/4


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As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

And Last updated on: Friday, 10-Jul-2020 14:19:19 BST