Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - St Olaves to Puddle dock

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.

OAT LANE.

B2094. Obverse. william . horne = A pair of antlers.
R . IN . OATE . LANE . 1671= A HALF PENNY.

ST. OLAVE'S, Southwark.

#857 NICOLAS BARNARD In the field, N. S. B.
Rev IN OLIVES. SOUTHWARKE 1654, in the field.

See note preceding No. 1168.

#858 MATHEW PEARCE MEALEMAN A wheatsheaf ; M. K. P.
Rev. ST. OLIVES . SOUTHWARK HIS HALF PENY.

#859 AT THE 3 CRANES In the field, three cranes (birds).
Rev. IN s. OLIVES STREETE In the field, S. E. S.

#860 AT 3 TOBACCO PIPES In the field, three pipes.
Rev. IN s. OLIVES STREETE M. C., in the field.

The small clove introduced over M. C. in the field, on the reverse, indicates the issuer to have been a grocer and tobacconist.

ST. OLAVE'S WATERGATE.

#861 AMBROSE BVTLER AT ST. OLIVES A corn bushel measure.
Rev. WATERGATE . SOUTHWARK HIS HALF PENY. A. M. B.

A corn-dealer or meal -man. From these stairs John Boydell delineated his most interesting print of old London Bridge, the buildings, and other peculiarities, in 1751.

OLD BAILEY.

#862 AT THE BLEW BELL IN A bell, in field.
Rev. THE OLD BALEY. 1650 In the field, T. K. F.

The sign still extant, the corner house leading into Prujean square. Here William Oldys, Norroy king of arms, author of the Life of Sir Walter Raleigh, and other productions which have honourably distinguished him among English historical writers, was wont, late in life, to spend his evenings, and drink to excess ; his favourite beverage being porter, with a glass of gin between each pot.
The Bell formerly being within the rules or liberties of the Fleet prison, Oldys jocularly named his drinking associates " rulers." From this house, a watchman, one of " the lights of other days," whom he regularly paid, used every night to lead him home to Bennett's hill, before twelve o'clock, in order to save sixpence, a fine paid to the porter of the Herald's Office, by all returning thither after that hour. Sometimes, and that not unfrequently, Oldys was so lumpily drunk, two were required to bear him home. He died April 15th, 1761, in his seventy-second year.

#863 NEXT TO THE 3 CRANES In the field, W. B. 1651.
Rev. TAVERN. OVLD BALEY SA[L]TER W. B. 1651. br>
#864 THOMAS PAULSON In the field, a spread eagle.
Rev. IN YE OVLD BAYLEY T. E. P., in the field.

B2100. Obverse. the . black . spread . eagle = A spread-eagle.
RR. IN . THE . OLD . BAILYE . 1650 = P . S . E. 1/4

The sign was the old Black Spread Eagle.

"The eagle with two necks in the imperial arms, and in the arms of the king of Spain, depicted on sign-boards as the Spread Eagle, signifies the east and west empire, and the extension of their power from the east to the west." Jo. Collet's
Common Place Book, Addit. MS. in Museo, 3890.

#865 AT THE LION AND BALL Lion current, ball before him.
Rev. IN THE OLD BAYLEY In the field, N. E. S. 1/4

Query, whether this sign underwent subsequently a different appellation ; the diurnals at a later date, having recorded " Yesterday, March 8th, 1764, departed this life in some small hopes of the chance of a better, at her school, the Golden Lion, known by the name of the Yellow Lamb, in the Old Bailey, Mrs. Smith, the virtuous widow of the late distinguished Mr. John Smith, of the same place, vintner, who made his exit a few days since."

B2097. Obverse. EDWARD . BACKER . IN = A Crown.
R. THE . OVLD . BAILY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. E . I . B.

B2099. Obverse. ANN . CLEAYTON . 1669 = HIR HALF PENY.
R. IN . THE . OLD . BAYLY = A . C.

B2105. Obverse. AT . THE . SWAN . IN . THE = A Swan.
R. OLD . BAILYE . 1650 = 1 . A . G. 1/4

B2107. Obverse. AT . THE . CROWNE . IN = A Crown.
R. THE . GREAT . OVLD . BALY = T . K . H. 1/4

B2108. Obverse. at . the . George . in = St. George and the Dragon.
R. THE . OVLD . BAYLY . 57 = W . E . 1 . 1/4

B2109. Obverse. at . the . 3 . candlesticks = Three candlesticks.
R. IN . THE . OVLD . BALY . 1649 = A . I . K. 1/4

B2110. Obverse. phillipa . kenn . at. the = St. George and the Dragon.
R. GEORGE . IN . THE . OLD . BALEY = P . K. 1/4

B2111. Obverse. THE . GOVLDEN . FAVLCON = A falcon.
RR. IN . THE . OLD . BAYLYE = M . N. 1/4

B2114. Obverse. the . Star . and . Chandler = A blazing star.
R. IN . THE . OLD . BAYLEY = A . M . S. 1/4br>
B2115. Obverse. HENREY . SANDYS . AT . THE = An angel.
R. IN . THE . OVLD . BAYLEY . l 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. H . F . S.

B2116. Obverse. Richard . Sutten . at . y e . KING s = Bust of Charles II. crowned.
R. TAVERN . IN . THE . OLD . BAYLY = HIS HALF PENY. R . S. A

B2117. Obverse. AT . Ye . SHIPE . TAVERN = A ship.
R. IN . YE . OVLD . BAYLY = T . B . T. 1/4

B2118. A variety has the device and initials transposed, and bayle for BAYLY. 1/4

The name of the issuer of these tokens is given in the following advertisement, which appeared in the Mercurius Publicus, No. 33, August 14-21, 1662, p. 555 :

“ An Intermewed Lammeret, lost on Munday the fourth of this present August, from Wootton-Woodhall in Hertfordshire, having upon one of her legs a black
vowell inscribed Philip Boteler Esquire. If any one can give notice of the said Hauk to Master Tayler at the Ship Tavern in the Old-Bayly London , or to Sir Philip Boteler Knight of the Bath, at his house Wotton-Woodhall in Hertfordshire, he shall have 40s. for his pains.”

“To his Moeonian Hkbe, Will. Meere, his onely Pierian Pilote, at the Ship in the Old Bayly.” —Title of dedicatory verses in R. Braithwait’s Lawes of Drinking , 1671.

B2120. Obverse. JOHN . VERE . AT . THE = A plough.
R. PLOW . IN . THE . OLD . BAYLY = I . B . V. 1/4

B2121. A halfpenny of John Vere has on Obverse his half peny, and is dated 1664. 1/4

B2122. Obverse. Man . in . the . Moon . in . old = A man within a crescent moon.
R. baley . tal . chandler = t . w; above, a string of candles. 1/4


LITTLE OLD BAILEY.

The now west side of the Old Bailey, from Fleet lane to Snow hill, was the west side of the Little Old Bailey ; but when the intermediate buildings were demolished for the present space, the Little Old Bailey became extinct. br>
#866 GEO. ETCHYS AT YE UPPER In field, Carpenters' arms.
Rev. END OF LITLE OLD BAYLY In field, G. H. E.

#867 AT THE 7 STARS IN THE Seven stars, in the field.
Rev. LITTLE OVLD BEALEY In the field, I. I. F. 1/4

#868 AL[I]CE WATE[R]S IN THE Tallow-chandlers 1 arms, in the field
Rev. LITTLE OVLDE BAYLEY A. W.

B2123. Obverse. Alce . Wates . in . the = Three pigeons.
R. LITLE . OVLDE . BAYLEY = A . W. 1/4p>

B2095. Obverse. at . the . corner . of . the = A fleur-de-lis.
RR R . LITLE . OVLDE . BAYLY . C = I . E . B. 1/4

B2098. Obverse. AT . THE . ROSE = I . C.
R. in . litle . ovld . bayley = A full-blown rose. 1/4

B2101. Obverse. Thomas . Eaveson = A spread-eagle.
R. LITTLE . OVLD . BAYLEY = T . P . E. 1/4

B2106. Obverse. Thomas . Hose . at . the = A dove and olive-branch.
R. IN . THE . LITTLE . OLD . BAYLY = HIS HALF PENY. T . R . H.

B2119. Obverse. ROBERT . TOWNSOND = Bust of a divine.
R.R. IN . LITTLE . OVLD . BALY = R . A . T. 1/4

OLD BARGE HOUSE (Bucklersbury).

B2124. Obverse. JANE . GUNN . AT . THE = 1666.
R. OLD . BARGE . HO . = A MEAL SHOP.



OLD CHANGE, Cheapside.

#869 EDWARD ANDREWES In the field, a rose and crown.

REV. IN YE OLDE CHANGE. I. A., in the field.   1/4

#870 EDWARD CHIPP IN In ,the field, a Tudor dragon.
Rev. YE OVLD CHANGE [16]59 E. G. C., in the field.   1/4

Signs, in most instances, derive their origin from devices or emblems which have continued to be presented to popular view. The Red Dragon is said to have been the armorial ensign of Cadwallader, the last of the British kings. Henry the Third, previous to an intended visit, in 1240, directed a standard, bearing a red dragon, to be placed in the abbey church of Westminster. He had also the same device borne before him as an ensign, in the battle with the barons at Lewes.

Edward the First fought under the red dragon, on his subjugation of Wales ; and Edward the Third erected the same standard in the memorable battle of Cressy, August 24th, 1346. Henry the Seventh, on entering into London, after the battle of Bosworth field, offered at the altar in St. Paul's church a standard charged with " a red fiery dragon, beaten upon white and green sarcenet." Professing to be descended from Cadwallader, he adopted the red dragon as a dexter  supporter to the royal arms. By the house of Tudor it was so continued to be borne, till it ceased with Queen Elizabeth, the last of that race.

#871 AT THE WILLOW TREE A willow tree, in the field.
Rev. IN THE OVLD CHANGE In the field, N. I. B.

B2126. Obverse. AT . THE . WORSTER . ARMES = A Castle.
R. IN . THE . OVLD . CHANGE = I . I . B. 1/4

B2127. Obverse. at . the . Willow . Tree = A willow-tree.
R. IN . THE . OVLD . CHANGE = N . I . B. 1/4

B2129. Obverse. Edmond . Dobson . at . the = An Indian smoking.
R. IN . THE . OVLD . CHANGE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2130. Obverse. John . Elliott . at = A rose and crown.
R. IN . YE . OVLD . CHANGE = I . E. 1/4

B2131. Obverse. Ann . Fisher . 1664 = The Merchant-Tailors’ Arms.
R. IN . THE . OLD . CHAINGE = A . F. 1/4

B2132. Obverse. John . GRIFFITH = An oil-jar.
R. IN . YE . OLD . CHANGE = I . M . G. 1/4

B2133. Obverse. John . Lisle . at . the . 3 = Three morris-dancers.
R. IN . THE . OLD . CHAINGE = HIS HALF PENY. I . A . L.

B2134. Obverse. John . Lisle . at . ye . 3 = Three morris-dancers.
R. IN . YE . OLD . CHANGE = I . A . L. 1/4

 

Old Fish-Street Hill, see FISH-STREET HILL.

Old Palace Yard, see PALACE YARD.


OLD STREET, St. Luke's.

#872 THE BELL BREWEHOVS - A bell, in the field.
Rev. IN OULD STREETE. 1652 - In the field, R. K. D.  1/4

#872*THO. WELLES : FRA. LEONARD A tun, from Vintners' arms.
Rev. THE BELL IN OULD STRET In the field, a bell.

#873 AT THE BLACKE GACK Black jack, or bombard, in field.
Rev. IN OULD STREET In the field, A. E. S.  1/4

Black jacks were formerly ostensible objects in the appliances of the ancient taverns. Ilford, in Wilkins's Miseries of Inforced Marriage, 1607,, 4to, servants' liveries being at this period almost invariably blue, accosts the clown on his entrance

" How now,, blue bottle, are you of the house ?
Clown. I have heard of many black jacks, sir, but never of a blue
bottle." Acti. sc. 1.

Hey wood, describing the vessels in use at ale-houses and taverns, says further " Other bottles we have of leather, but they most used by shepherds and harvest people of the country ; small jacks we have in many ale-houses of the city and suburbs, tipp'd with silver, besides the great black jacks and bombards at the court, which when the Frenchmen [who came here with Queen Henrietta Maria] first saw, they reported at their returne into their country the Englishmen used to drinke out of their bootes." Philocothonista : the Drmikard opened, 1635, 4to, p. 45.
The cost of a six-gallon black jack, in 1685, was thirty-six shillings. Archceologia, vol. xxxiv. p. 355.

#874 THOMAS HEDGER In the field, a crooked billet ; T. M. H.
Rev. IN OULD STREET. 1668 HIS HALFE PENNY.

#874* JOHN FULLERTON. IN OLD STREET An anchor, and 1
Rev. JOHN SANDSBURY. IN OLD STREET Checquers.

B2158. Obverse. EDWARD . BUCKLEY . BREWER = A hart lodged.
R. WITE . HART . OLD . STREETE = 1652. 1/4

B2162. Obverse. at . the . Princes . Armes = The Prince of Wales’s crest, P . C.
R. IN . OLD . STREETE . 1648 = R . M . L. 1/4

B2163. Obverse. Richard . Prentis . at . the = St. George at full speed and the Dragon.
R. GEORGE . IN . OULD . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2164. Obverse. MARY . ROW . IN . BLEW . ANCHOR = HER HALFE PENY.
R. ALLY . IN . OULD . STREET . 1667 = A roll of tobaCCO.

B2165. Obverse. the . Doggs . Head . in . the = A dog eating out of a pot.
R. POTTE . IN . OLD . STREETE = T . E . R. 1/4

B2167. Obverse. ROBART . SACKLER . AT . THE = A bull.
R. BVLL . IN . OULD . STREETE = R . S . S. 1/4

B2168. Obverse. JOHN . SAVAGE . IN = I . S . S.
R. OLD . STREETE . 1658 = A Comet. 1/4

B2169. Obverse. Edward . Tavener = A goat’s head.
R. IN . OULD . STREETE . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY.

B2170. Obverse. John . Twisle(ton) . in = A steering-wheel.
R. OVLD . STREET . 1659 = 1 . M . T. 1/4

B2172. Obverse. Richard . Yeatman . at . ye — A hart lodged ; a comet above it.
R. IN . OVLD . STREET . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY.

ORCHARD STREET, Westminster.

#875 PETER CLESBY IN ORCHARD A horse, with BLAK above.
Rev. STREET IN WESTMINSTER HIS HALFE PENNY. P. E. C.

The sign indicated on the token was the Black Horse.


OLD PALACE YARD, Westminster.

#876 JOHN HARMAN AT THE Crooked billet, in the field.
Rev. IN THE OVLD PALLACE HALF PENY . I. S. H.

Old Palace yard, the area beyond King Henry the Seventh's chapel, where the Victoria tower now frowns in sullen majestic height.

The communication hence to the Thames in the olden time was designated " the Parliament stairs."

B2155. Obverse. John . Guy . in . the . old . pallace = A human head on a dish.
R. YARD . IN . WESTMINSTER . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . E . G.

B2157. Obverse. Thomas. Pearson . in . the . olde = A naked child standing.
R. PALLACE. YARD . IN . WESTMINSTER = HIS HALF PENY. T . I . P.


NEW PALACE YARD.

#877 THO: PALLISER.NEW PALLACE Grocers Company arms.
Rev. HIS HALF PENY.1666 King's head ; Charles the Second.

New Palace yard, the area before the entrance to Westminster Hall ; the causeway to the Thames being known as Watermen's stairs.

The houses on the north side of New Palace yard, to which are attached the signs ; the old bell tower, whence was taken the great bell for St. Paul's cathedral ; and the hackney-coach stand, at that period, are all admirably displayed in Hollar's print of Westminster Hall, engraved in 1647.

#878 THOMAS PEARSON IN THE NEW Naked boy, in the field.
Rev. PALACE YARD IN WESTMINSTER HIS HALF PENNY. T. I. P.

B2046. Obverse. Edward . Gibson (in four lines across the field).
R. IN . Y E . NEW . PALLACE . YARD = POTTER. 1662. 1/4

B2047. Obverse. IN . THE . New . Pallis . yard = The Grocers’ Arms.
R. AT . WESTMINSTER . l649 = W . A . I. 1/4

B2048. A variety reads W . A . R. B2050. 1/4

B2049. Obverse. SIMON . NORCOTT . AT . Y . GOLDEN = A Star.
R. STARR . IN . THE . NEW . PALLACE = S . S . N. HIS HALF PENY.

B2052. Obverse. THO . STONE . AT . THE = A leg.
R. LEGG . IN . PALACE . YARD = T . P . S. 1/4

“All Tenants for Lives, or for Years, which hold of the Bishops, or Deans, and Chapters, are desired to meet on Tuesdaies and Saturdaies, at eight of the clock in the morning, at the Sign of the Legg at Westminster, in the Palace-yard, to consider of their respective interests.”—The Parliamentary Intelligencer , No. 27, June 25—July 2, 1660.

The following announcement appeared in the Mercurhis Publicus in 1660 (p- 332 ):

“All persons concerned in purchasing of publique land in England, Scotland and Ireland, are desired to join in the present Addresses made to the King and Parliament for the securing of their several purchases : and that each City, Town and County do imploy an agent or agents to appear for them, and to give in their names whereby they may be included in the present addresses. The Gentlemen appointed by the Purchasers in and about London and places adjacent, do meet daily at the Legg in Pallace Yard near Westminster Hall.”

“ With Mr. Creed and More to the Leg in the Palace to dinner, which I gave them, and after dinner, I saw the girl of the house, being very pretty, go into a chamber, and I went in after her and kissed her.”—Pepys’ “Diary,” April 6, 1661.

B2053. Obverse. EDWARD . WRITE . AT . YE . BLUE = A boar.
R. IN . Y E . NEW . PALLACE . YARD = E . S . W.


PALL MALL.


B2174. Obverse. Richard . Adams . at . the = A branch of oak with acorns.
R. TAVERN . IN . PALL . MALL = R . I . A. 1/4

B2175. Obverse. EDMUND . BROWNE . AT . THE .... PALL . MALL (in five lines).
R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . STRONG . WATER . MAN.8 (in five lines).

B2176. Obverse. ROBERT . GISBERNE . IN . THE = HIS HALFE PENNY.
R. OLD . PELLMELL . PEWTERER = R . A . G. 1667.

B2177. Obverse. Richard . Pinck . at . ye . hercvles = Hercules between two pillars.
R. PILLERS . IN . PALMAL . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . M . P.

B2178. Obverse. MATHEW . ROGERMAN . AT . YE . 2 = TwO pigeons.
R. IN . THE . OLD . PELLMELL . 67 = HIS HALFE PENNY. M . M . R.


PANCRAS LANE (Queen Street, Cheapside).

B2179. Obverse. at . the . New . Virginne = An Indian smoking, holding a tobacco-leaf.
R. IN . PANKCROSE . LANE = T . S . B. 1/4


PANIER ALLEY or PANYER ALLEY (Paternoster Row).

#879 EDW: FOSTER . LETHERSELER AT Ye Gridiron, and a nags head upon it.
Rev. CORNER SHOPP IN PANIER ALLEY HIS HALFE PENNY.

#880 ROBERT HAYES AT YE. COFFEE In field, a Turk's head.
Rev. HOUSE IN PANIER ALLEY HIS HALF PENY.

Panier alley was so called from having been in the olden time the standing of the bakers' boys with their paniers. By statute of 1302, 30 Edward I., if not before, the bakers of London were bound to sell no bread in their shops or houses, but in the market. The bakers' boys stood here in rows, forming an alley, with their bread in paniers ; and records are extant, dated 1440, in which Panier alley is mentioned as a place long and distinctively known. The bakers of Stratford and other neighbouring villages brought also, on all days but Sundays and principal feasts, bread in long carts, the bread being two ounces in the penny wheat loaf heavier than the wheat loaf baked in the city ; these were pitched and sold by boys from paniers, at regularly defined standings, not only on the usual market-days, but daily. Bishop Bale has recorded the cry of the bakers' boys at Sturbridge fair near Cambridge, in the reign of King Edward the Sixth " Buy and beare away : steale and run awaye." Later, as the ballad affirms, Robin Conscience in his ramble through Newgate market,

" Where country women, maids, and men,
Were selling needful things ;"

encountered the railing of the butterwomen, whose butter weighed not down their scales ; and "the bakers that stood in a row" brawled at him, because he reminded them that but for the dread of the law their loaves would be less than the statutable weight.

Panier alley, wholly destroyed in the great fire of 1666, immediately faced the end of St. Martin's lane, more generally known as St. Martin-le-grand ; but on rebuilding was placed a few feet westward of the original site ; and by an order of the court of Common Council, dated April 29th, 1667, was " to be enlarged to nine feet in width, and paved with free-stone for passengers." As a narrow in-convenient way, it would appear to be sarcastically alluded to in Homer-a-la- Mode, the ninth book of Homer's Iliads, in English burlesque, 1681, 8vo, where it is said the Greeks promised to Meleager, since he had slain the boar, a pretty piece

" Which they affirm'd to be as good
As that where Panyer alley stood."

Later was published " News from Pannier alley : or a true relation of some pranks the Devil hath lately play'd there, with a plaster-pot, 1687," 4to.

The buildings in or about Panier alley appear to have been at this time in progress, as an ensculptured tablet was soon after placed against the wall of a house on the east side, having reference to the wonted usages of the place, like a departed spirit hovering over its former locality ; a naked urchin, seated on end of panier, represents a baker's boy supplying from the panier the demand for a loaf ; below him, inscribed

" WHEN Ye HAVE SOUGHT THE CITTY EOVND
YET STILL TH[l]S IS THE HIGH[E]S T GROVND.
AVGVST THE 27 1688."

Robert Hayes, burned out from this alley, re-established his calling as " a coffee-man," under the same sign in Barbican.

B2182. Obverse. Hen . Lacke . Akorne — An acorn.
R. IN . PANYER . ALLEY = H . L. 1/4


PARKER'S LANE, Drury Lane.

So called from the mansion of Peter Parker, esq., who resided here in 1623. It is now named Parker street.

#881 HENRY DUNSCOMBE IN . 1668 A man dipping candles.
Rev. PARKERS LANE. HIS HALF PENY H. I. D. 1668.

B2184. Obverse. EDWARD . KING . AT . THE = A flagon.
R. In . Parkers . Lane . his . halfe . Penny (in five lines).

B2185. Obverse. W . K . WHITCOMBE . BREWER . IN = W . W and four circles.
R. PARKERS . LANE . HIS HALF PENY = 1664.

B2186. Obverse. W . K . WHITCOMBE . brewer = W . W and four circles.
R. IN . PARKERS . LANE = 1659. 1/4


PATERNOSTER ROW.

#882 THE CASTELL TAVERN A castle, in field.
Rev. IN PATERNOSTER ROW In the field, I. D. B.

Tarlton, Queen Elizabeth's favourite stage clown, is said to have kept an ordinary, " the sign of the Castle," on the spot where Dolly's chop-house is now situated. Tarlton died in September, 1588.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, has this notice : " December 16th, 1648, died Gough, vintner, at the Castle in Paternoster row." Possibly J. B. issued the token on his becoming Gough's successor. In the great fire in September, 1666, the Castle tavern, at the east end on the north side of Paternoster row, was wholly destroyed, but rebuilt of considerable magnitude ; the large room in particular was distinguished for its extent and painted embellishments. Concerts of music were frequently held, here about the middle of the last century ; and the Castle Society of Music was long one of eminent distinction. In 1768 their performances were conducted at Haberdashers' hall, but their business meetings were held at the Half-moon tavern in Cheapside. The Castle tavern appears at this time to have fallen into desuetude, and in 1770 was the Oxford bible warehouse, where were deposited the productions of the Oxford university press ; another portion being occupied by a furniture auctioneer named Upton. Soon after six in the morning of January 8th, in that year, a fire occurred at Messrs Johnson and Payne, booksellers, in Paternoster row, that destroyed their house, as also the Oxford bible warehouse, involving a loss of more than 7000?. ; and Cock's printing-house. An advertisement in April, 1771, proffered on a building-lease, the freehold ground ' ' fronting Paternoster row, from east to west, sixty-six feet ; and in depth from south to north, ninety-six feet, being the ground where the Castle tavern and three other houses lately stood, destroyed by fire."

#883 CHAPTER COFFEE HOUSE (4) In the field, a mitre.
Rev. Blank : struck on leather.

A LEATHER GROAT. The letters in the legend are reversed, and the figure (4) is distinct on lower verge. M. C. Tutet, whose collections were dispersed in 1786, possessed a similar piece struck on leather, but his had the figure 2, or half groat.

#884 CHAPTER COFFEE HOUSE In the field, a mitre.
Rev. Blank: struck on leather.

Different, and smaller in size. The leather appears to have been gilded.

The Chapter coffee-house, at the north-west corner of Paul's alley, long the resort of eminent literary characters, was, it is stated, finally closed on the death of Mr. Charles Faithfull, the proprietor, in November, 1853.

B2187. Obverse. Thomas . Allen . in . 1664 = The bust of a queen crowned, with sceptre.
R. PATERNOSTER. ROW = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2189. Obverse. ye . mearmayd . tavern = A mermaid.
R. IN . PATER . NOSTER . ROE = S . E . B.

B2190. Obverse. the . mer . mayde . tavern = A mermaid.
R. IN . PATER . NOSTER . ROW = R . I . F.

The Mermaid was, at the time of the Fire, in the occupation of one Anthony Clarke, who, in his petition, states that it was “ formerly a dark and back-house of small custom, but that the Prerogative office was kept near to it, and that the said office being removed, it is not likely to be well customed for a long time.”—
Aker man.

B2191. Obverse. THO . TATE in Queens . head = A queen’s head.
R. COVRT . IN PATERNOSTER . RO = HIS HALFE PENY

PAUL’S ALLEY (Paternoster Row).

B2192. Obverse. John . Broome . 1657 = A harrow.
R. IN . PAVLS . ALLEY = I . E . B.


ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD.

#885 GILES CALVERT AT THE Spread-eagle, in the field.
Rev. WEST END OF ST. PAULS In the field, G. E. C.

The Spread Eagle was long a sign of notoriety in St. Paul's churchyard ; tradition has recorded that the gilded copper vane in the form of an eagle, on the lofty spire of old St. Paul's, was during a high wind blown down, and falling against the sign of the Spread Eagle beat it to the ground*. The first edition of Shakespeare's Troilm and Cressida was printed at the Spread Eagle in St. Paul's churchyard. At the north door of St. Paul's, William Burley, at the sign of the Spread Eagle, in 1609, published Pamelia: Music's Miscellanie of pleasant Run delays and Catches, accredited as the earliest practical English book of catches, canons, rounds, and glees. The north side of St. Paul's churchyard became at this period an established market, and there are various tokens of the traders here located. The chapter-house, and the cloister on the north side, were by order of the Commonwealth authorities demolished, the ground cleared, and paved with the old stone of these buildings. Dugdale mentions in his Diary August 6th, 1657, as being the first day the herb women moved from their stands in Cheapside into the new market thus created. The throng of persons caused an order for its suppression, October 21st, 1661, when " persons vending roots, herbs, and fruits," were directed " to sell only in the streets called Aldermanbury and Broad street, and then only on market-days." Mercuriw Publicus, October 24th, 1661, p. 671.

" During a great tempest at sea in January, 1506, Philip king of Castile and his queen were weather-driven, and landed at Falmouth. The same tempest blew down the eagle of brass, off the spire of St. Paul's church in London, and in the falling the same eagle broke and battered the black eagle that hung for a sign in St. Paul's churchyard." Stow's Annals, p. 484. The black eagle, the cognizance of the house of Austria, of which Philip was the head.

#886 AT THE 3 TUNN TAVERN Three tuns ; Vintners' arms.
Rev. IN S. PAULS CHURCHYARD In the field, E. C.

On the north side, at the west end of St. Paul's churchyard, is a house of stage-coach notoriety, bearing the ludicrous sign of the Goose and Gridiron, which has puzzled many a wiseacre for a definition. Situated in London-house yard, so named as being contiguous to the former residence of the bishop of London, the house, before the great fire, was known by the sign of the Mitre ; and in 1664, Robert Hubert, alias Forges, " gent., and sworn servant to His Majesty," exhibited here a museum of natural rarities, as the catalogue describes them, " collected by him at great cost, and during thirty years travel in foreign countries ; daily to be seen at the place called the musick -house at the Miter, near the west end of St. Paul's church." Concerts of music and musical parties were also among the diversions the house afforded, till the fire in September, 1666, destroyed all. On the rebuilding of the house the new tenant appears to have by-shop'd the mitre ; and, in contempt of the dissolute harmonies that had hitherto been the attraction, he perverted the Swan and Lyre, the crest and charge on the arms of the company of Musicians, into the silly Goose and Gridiron, forgetting possibly the goose had once the honour of being the capitolian guard of ancient Rome.

The imprint on the title of " a Discourse of the national excellencies of England, by R. H.," affords some allusion to these buildings erected on the cathedral lands ; " printed for Henry Fletcher, at the Three Gilt Cups, in the new buildings, near the west end of St. Paul's, 1658," duod.

#887 JOHN WEBSTER AT Y ALMON An almond tree ; 1663.
Rev. TREE . IN PAULS CHURCHYARD The same, I. M. W.

The adaptation of the almond tree, as a sign, so proximate to the church, has possibly an allusion to the fine allegorical description of inevitable human decrepitude, in Ecdesiastes, ch. xii., v. 5, when " the almond tree shall flourish," and " the mourners go about the streets."

#888 THE COFFEE HOUSE AT THE Turk's head, in the field.
Rev. WEST END OF ST. PAULS LONDON Name in a monogram; and I?

This is possibly the house referred to by Pepys, March 20, 1662-3 :
“Meeting with Mr. Kirton’s kinsman in Paul’s Church Yarde, he and I to a coffee-house.”
It is extremely rare to find the word “ London ” on a token. For other examples, vide Nos. 731 and 2310.

A large-sized coffee-house penny, one of the rarest of trader's' tokens.

B2717. Obverse. at . the . Sampson . in = Samson and the lion.
R. S . PAULS . CHURCH . YARD = HIS HALFE PENY W . E . C.

B2718. Obverse. at . the . Samson . in = Samson and the lion.
R. PAULES . CHURCHEYARD = W . A . C. 1/4

B2720. Obverse. John . Dickenson . in = A sugar-loaf.
R. PAULES . CHURCHYARD = I . D. 1/4

B2721. Obverse. John . Dormer . at . Ye = A rose and crown.
R. WEST . END . OF . POWLES = I . D. 58. 1/4

B2722. A variety reads on reverse, westend . S . PAULs = I . S . B, with a small r beneath for Rawlins, the engraver.

B2723. Obverse. Feathers . Taverne = A plume of feathers.
R. IN . PAULS . CHURCH . YARD = I . S . F.

The following advertisement, which appeared in the Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 11, March 10-17, 1661-2, p. 164, fixes the position of the “Feathers” :

“ Stolen in the night the 3. of this instant March , 1 stout bay Mare, 9. years old, with a black strong Crest, and bob tailed, with spots about the Saddle ....
Also then a lighter bay Mare, 4. years old .... Who ever gives notice of them to ... . Mr. Paul Donne Skrivner neer the Feathers Tavern at the west end of
St, Pauls London , shall be sure of ample recompense.”

B2724. Obverse. Georg . Green . at . th = An anchor.
R. NEARE . PAULINS . CVRCH = G . G. 1/4

B2725. Obverse. F . H . at . St . Peter . and = Bust of St. Peter with the keys.
R. St . PAULE . at . St . PAULES . CHURCH = Bust of St. Paul with the sword.

“Near the South chain of Paules Churchyard is the Paule Head Tavern, which
house, wdth the appurtenances, was of old time called Paules brewhouse, for that
the same was so employed, but since been left off, and let out.”—Stow, edition
1878, p. 137.

B2726. Obverse. AT . THE . BELL . TAVERN = A bell.
R. IN . PAUL . CHURCH . YARD = R . H.

B2727. Obverse. the . tobacco . rowle = A roll of tobacco.
R. IN . PAULES . CHURCH . YARD = S . M . H.

B2728. Obverse. John . Miller . at . the = A Windmill.
R. east . end . of . Powles = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.


PAUL’S CHAIN (St. Paul’s Churchyard).

B2193. Obverse. William . ADKINSON = The Apothecaries’ Arms.
R. IN . PALLES . CHAINE = W . C . A.   1/4

B2194. Obverse. THOMAS . SWETTINGHAM = A castle.
R. IN . S T . PAVLES . CHAINE = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2195. Obverse. Edw . Woodward . at . y e = Two daggers crossed.
R. PAVLES . CHAYNE . COOKE = E . A . W.   1/4


PAUL'S WHARF, Upper Thames Street.

" From Paul's chain at the foot of Benet hill, formerly called Paul's wharfe
hill, is Paul's wharf, having a common stair or landing-place from the Thames."

#889 THE BALL [BELL?] NEERE The figure 3, in the field.
Rev. PAULES WHARFE In the field, I. H.

The Ball would seem to be an error for " the Bell ;" as Abraham Chitty, in 1669, issued a half-penny token from " the Bell brewhouse, neare Paules wharfe." There was also the Bell yard, by Paul's wharf. A singularity attached to this token is the figure 3 on the obverse. Query, three pence ? Mark Cephas Tutet, in his choice collection of traders' tokens, dispersed after his death in 1786, had a similar piece, that in place of the 3 had on the obverse " 6?"

#890 AT YE NEXT BOAT. BY PAULS A wherry; NEXT BOAT.
Rev. WHARFE AT PETERS HILL FOOT M. M. B.

Gallants and play-goers to the Bear-garden and theatres on the Bankside conferred no little celebrity on Paul's-wharf stairs, from its having long been the usual ferry, by a species of general concurrence.

The words " NEXT BOAT," on the token, sufficiently indicate the rendezvous of the boatmen plying for passsengers at Paul's-wharf stairs. A ballad, entitled " The Boatman's Song," printed in the Loyal Garland, at this period a highly popular collection of royalist effusions, affords some illustration of the hailing of the boatmen to strangers coming within their bounds :

" Will you go by water, Sir ?
I am the sculler ;
Go with my fare up westward, Sir,
My boat shall be no fuller.
Next oars, Sir, next oars !
Whither is't you go ?
To Foxhall, or Westminster,
Or through bridge ho ?"

The phrase " NEXT BOAT " obtains some illustration by a reference to the watermen's fares, as set forth by the Lord Mayor and Court of Aldermen, September 7th, 1671 : " Over the water directly in the next sculler, between London Bridge and Limehouse, or London Bridge and Fox-hall, 2d."

Faux or Vaux hall, by the attractive mechanical contrivances of Sir Samuel Morland, had long before become a place of fashionable resort for the city gallants. Evelyn in his Diary, July 22d, 1661, notices he " went to see the new Spring Garden, at Lambeth, a prettily contrived plantation."

B2200. Obverse. the . frien . pan . in . bel = A frying-pan.
R. YARD . BY . POWLS . WHARF = D . I . T.


PEERPOOL LANE (Gray’s Inn Lane).

(Now Portpool Lane.)

B2201. Obverse. Hvm . Asmore . baker = Detrited.
R. IN . PERPOOL . LANE = HIS H. PENY TOKEN.

B2202. Obverse. John . Baker . 1644 = A sugar-loaf.
R. IN . PER . POOLE . LANE = I . F . B. 1/4

B2203. Obverse. William . Coulson = A sheaf of corn.
R. PEERE . POOLE . LANE = W . A . C. 1/4

B2204. Obverse. John . Davison . in . peerpool = A unicorn.
R. LANE . HIS . HALFE . PENY = I . A . D.

B2205. Obverse. Thomas . Gale . neere = A shoemaker fitting a shoe to a female, seated.
R. PEARPOOLE . LANE . END = T . I . G. 1/4

B2206. Obverse. John . Hind . and . Tho . Gwilym = King’s head, full-face.
R. BREWERS . IN . PERPOOLE . LANE = THEIR HALFE PENY.

PEPPER ALLEY, Southwark.

#891 THOMAS CROWDER AT T. C. in monogram, in the field.
Rev. PEPPER ALLEY GATE In the field, T. S. C.

#892 ARTHVR ADAMS Oar, from crest of Watermens arms.
Rev. IN PEPPER ALEY.1652 Peacock, tail displayed.

Why watermen should require such small change as tokens were likely to affoi'd seems now problematical. Decker, in his Gull's Horn-look, 1609, speaking of gallants who crossed the Thames to the theatres on the Bankside, says " no matter, upon landing, whether you have money or no ; you may swim in twenty of their boats upon the river upon ticket;" hence the phrase to go " on tick," to go on trust.


PETER STREET (Properly Denzell Street, Clare Market), Westminster.

B2207. Obverse. John . Gray . at . moth . shipt on = Mother Shipton standing.
R. PETER . STRE . IN . NEW . MARKET = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2208. Obverse. at . the . Dager . in = A dagger.
R. PEETER . STREETE = G . M . R. 1/4

B2209. Obverse. at . the . Kings . Head . in = A crowned bust of James I.
R. PETTER . STREETE . W . M. = R . R . Y. 1/4


PETTICOAT LANE, Whitechapel.

Petticoat lane was formerly called Hog lane. Stow, in 1598, describing the neighbourhood as pleasant fields since the accession of Queen Elizabeth, observes " now within a few years is made a continual building throughout, of garden houses and small cottages, and the fields on either side be turned into garden plots, tenter yards, bowling alleys, and such like."

The revocation of the edict of Nantes, 1685, drove thousands of the French protestant broad-silk weavers to England, many of whom settled themselves in this vicinity.

#894 DANIELL DEBOURCK In the field, HIS HALF PENY.
Rev. IN PETTECOATE LANE Bird in hand, in the field.

#895 NEARE THE SHEARES In the field, a pair of shears.
Rev. IN PETTICOATE LANE S. A. H., in the field.  1/4

#896 CHRISTOPHER WELDON AT Ye A half-moon, in the field.
Rev. IN PETTICOATE LANE . 1667 HIS HALFE PENY.

The Half-moon, or crescent, seems to be but an alteration of the Turk's Head as a sign. In Cartwright's comedy of The Ordinary, 1651, 8vo, is this allusion :

" Slicer. The sign o' th' Half-moon that hangs at your door, is not for nought.
Credulous. That's the Turk's arms, they say." Act iv. sc. 1.

The Turks, a horde of rude Asiatic warriors, entered Constantinople, by the gate of St. Romanus, on May 29th, 1453, and subverted the last remains of the once all-powerful Roman empire : the Crescent trampled despotically on the Cross. Europe was at that time in a state of utter prostration ; science, literature, and the arts were in abeyance ; and the destruction of the eastern empire completed the ruin of its commerce. -/Eneas Sylvius, subsequently Pope Pius the Second, while describing Europe in the fifteenth century, in a few nervous sentences, colours the seeming mystery of the causes of this general debasement. He describes Europe " as a body without a head a republic without laws or magistrates. Every state has a separate prince, and every prince a separate interest. What eloquence could unite so many discordant and hostile powers under the same standard ? What mortal could reconcile the English with the French Genoa with Arragon the Germans with the natives of Hungary and Bohemia ? If a small number enlisted in the holy war, they must be overthrown by the infidels ; if many, by their own weight and confusion."

The Turks became the masters of commerce, and the flag bearing the Crescent floated vauntingly in the breeze, till the discovery of America, and the adoption of the new route to India by way of the Cape of Good Hope, at the close of the same century, turning the tide of events, the decline of the Turkish power commenced ; it has continued on the wane, and must at length succumb to superior intelligence and independent commercial enterprize, the imperishable glories of knowledge and energy. In this year, 1853, after a lapse of four centuries, how nearly has the Cross borne down the Crescent.

#897 GRAVES WEAVER. AT Ye Wicker cradle, in the field.
Rev. IN PETTICOATE LANE In the field, G. W.

Weaver was a basket-maker ; the wicker cradle being the crest of the Basket-makers Company.

B2210. Obverse. John . Bickcem . at . the = The bust of Charles II.
R. IN . PETTICOATE . LANE . 68 = HIS HALF PENY.

B2211. Obverse. WILL . BOLTON . AT . YE . BLACK . BEL = A bell.
R. IN . PETTY . COAT . LANE . CHANDL R = HIS HALF PENNY. W . K . B.

“ Lost upon December the 12th. a Laced Band, the Lace of a quarter of a yard deep, and the Band marqued in the Stock with /. B. If anyone shall give notice of it to John Hawks at the Black Bell in Petticoat-Lane , he shall have 30s. for his peyns.”—The Newes, No. 2, January 7, 1663, p. 15.

B2212. Obverse. at . the . Whit . Lyon = A lion rampant.
R. IN . PETTICOTE . LANE = R . E . D. 1/4

B2214. Obverse. Anthony . Finch = Five ink-horns.
R. IN . PETTECOTE . LANE = A . S . F. 1/4

B2216. Obverse. Samuell . Kent . in = A crescent.
R. PETTICOTE . LANE = S . S . K. 1/4

B2217. Obverse. RALPH . MARKLAND . AT . YE . RED = A CROSS.
R. CROSS. IN . PETTICOAT . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. 1667.

B2218. Obverse. Jefery . Wallett = A lion rampant.
R. IN . PETECOTE . LANE = I . M . W. 1/4

B2221. Obverse. Henry . White . hart = A hart leaping.
R. IN . PETICOAT . LANE . 57 = H . W. 1/4


PETTY FRANCE, Bishopsgate.

Petty France was subsequently called Lamb alley ; but being demolished, the ground was in 1730 occupied by more extensive buildings, and in the Parish Clerks' Survey, 1732, is thus described: " Petty France, that was a ruined desolate place, is now raised a great deal higher, and is made a fine spacious street, containing many large uniform houses." Petty France is now New Broad street.

#898 JOHN BARNES . CHANDLER Carpenters' arms, in field.
Rev. IN PETTEI FRANCE In the field, I. S. B.  1/4

#899 WILLIAM RACK AT Ye An Indian, in field. Rev. IN
PETTY FRANCE. [16]66 In the field, R. M. R.

B2225. Obverse. William . Rack . at . ye = An Indian holding a dart.
R. IN . PETTY . FRANCE . 66 = W . I . R. 1/4

The figure of the Indian is the sinister supporter to the Distillers Company arms.

B2223. Obverse. Tho . Claroe . in . more . feilds = A man dipping candles.
R. AGAINST . PETY . FRANCE . GATE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2224. Obverse. Sam . Hunt . at . ye . ball = A ball suspended.
R. IN . PETTY . FRANCE = S . E . H. 1670. 1/4


PETTY FRANCE, Westminster.

The line of road from Tothill street, Westminster, to James street, Buckingham gate, was formerly known as Petty France. Milton the poet is said to have resided here, on the north side, next door to James Lord Scudamore's, abutting on St. James's park, from 1652 to the eve of the Eestoration in 1660. " Petty France is now named York street, from John Sharp, archbishop of York, primate and metropolitan of England, having there his town residence." Hatton's New View of London, 1708, p. 639.

#900 AT THE SAUL IN PETTY The Conversion of Saul.
Rev. FRANC[E] WESTMINSTER In the field, I. S. T.

B2228. Obverse. at . the . Saul . in . petty = Saul on the ground, his horse standing near.
R. FRANC . WESTMINSTER = I . S . T. 1/4

" He fell to the earth, and heard a voice." Acts, ix. 4. One of the puritanical devices of the period, in allusion to St. Paul, the tutelary saint of the metropolis.

#901 NICHOLAS SHERMAN WHIT A large building, in field.
Rev. HALL IN PETTI FRANCE In the field, N. M. S.

B2226. Obverse. Nicholas . Sherman . whit = A building with a high roof and a gate.
R. HALL . IN . PETTI . FRANCE = N . M . S. 1/4

Appears to have been a sign of the Banquetting house, Whitehall.

B2227. Obverse. Will . Smith . in . petty = The King’s head in the royal oak.
R. FRANCE . WESTMINSTER = W . M . S. 1/4


PHILPOT LANE, Fenchurch Street.

" So called of Sir John Philpot, who dwelled there, and was owner thereof."

#902 ROBERT NEVILL Three stags, two and one, in the field.
Rev. IN PHILPOT LANE In the field, R. A. N.

B2232. Obverse. Robert . NEVELL = The Leathersellers’ Arms.
R. IN . PHILPOT . LANE = R . A . N.  1/4

Query, arms of the Leathersellers Company ?

B2229. Obverse. Samvell . Hewson . in = A wheatsheaf.
R. PHILLPOT . LANE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. S . A . H.

B2230. Obverse. LAWRENCE . LANCASTER = 1655.
R. IN . PHILPOT . LANE = L . S . L.  1/4

B2231. Obverse. Will : Mosely . in . moselies = ST Hugh ; a half figure.
R. COVRT . IN . FILPOT . LANE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . R . M.

B2233. Obverse. AT . THE . SUGAR . LOAFE = A Sugar-loaf.
R. in . philpot . LANE = Detrited.  1/4


PICCADILLY. /h2>

#903 RICHARD GROOME IN An anchor, crown on the stem.
Rev. PICCADILLY. 1665 Infield, HIS HALFE PENNY.

TThe old way of depicting the Crown and Anchor.

B2234. Obverse. ROBERT . BEARD . IN = R . I . B.
R. PEKADILLA= 1662.

B2235. A variety has two mermaids on field of Obverse.
R. R . I . B . peckadilley (in two lines). 1/4

B2236. Obverse. William . Flindell . A man dipping candles.
R. IN . PECKADILLE . 58 = W . M . F. 1/4

B2237. Obverse. Edw . Gillney . at . ye = Three horseshoes.
R. IN . PICKEDILLE = E . G . H. 1/4

B2239. Obverse. WILLIAM . HILL=l670.
R. IN . PICKADILLY = W . I . H. 1/4

B2240. Obverse. Abbett . Nevell . in = A perfectly plain rectangle.
R. PICKEDILLY . 1657 = A . A . N. 1/4

B2241. Obverse. at . Pickidilly . 57 = The Blacksmiths’ Arms.
R. in . y e . haymarket = W . E . P. 1/4

B2242. Obverse. John . Palmer . ye . GEORGE = St. George and the Dragon.
R. AT . PIKEADELYE = I . M . P. 1/4

B2243. Obverse. Richard . Thorp . grocer = The Grocers’ Arms.
R. IN . PICKADILLEY . 1 666 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2244. Obverse. John . Vaughan . at . the = A still, with the fire beneath.
R. IN . PICKADILLY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . A . V.

B2245. Obverse. JNO . Vaughan . at . ye = A still, and a man blowing the fire.
R. IN . PICKADILLY = I . A . V. 1/4

B2246. Obverse. O. Will . Vesey . at . the . garden = The Fruiterers’ Arms.
R. HOVSE . NEARE . PICCADILLY = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . S . V.

B2247. Obverse. Joh . Walker . svgar = A sugar-loaf.
R. LOAFE . PICKADILLY . 59 = 1 . S . W. 1/4


PICKLE-HERRING STAIRS, Southwark. /h2>

##904 EDWARD BRENT A hoy, or sailing-boat, in the field.
Rev. AT PICKELL HERRING In the field, E. C. B.

#905 EDWARD BRENT In the field, HIS HALF PENNY. 1668.
Rev. The field occupied by a hoy, or sailing-boat.

In Mottley's Survey of London, Westminster, and Soutliwark, published under the name of Robert Seymour, 1734, fol., vol. i. p. 817, is noticed a monument in St. Olave's churchyard, to " Edward Brent, esq., 1676 :" he was doubtless the issuer of these tokens.

#906 MARGRET BROWNE AT YE BLVE Anchor, in the field; M. B.
Rev. NEARE PICKLE HERING IN SOUTHWARK  HIS HALFE PENY. 1668.

An octagon in shape. In the die HIS was originally punched : later struck pieces show the altei-ation to HER.

#907 IAMES HOLLAND Bakers Company arms, in the field. br> Rev AT PICKLE HERING In the field, I. M. H.

#908 IAMES HOLLAND. HIS HALF PENNY, in four lines.
Rev. The date 1668, and the Bakers Company arms.

#909 THOMAS HVTHINSON In the field, HIS HALF PENY.
Rev. AT PICKELL HEARING Five tobacco-pipes.


PIE CORNER, Smithfield.

&" Pie corner, a place so called of such a sign, sometimes a fair inn for receipt of travellers, but now [1603] divided into tenements; and over against the said Pie corner lieth Cocke lane, which runneth down to Oldbourne conduit. 'V-Stow. The Pie inn appears to have been on the east side, above Giltspur street, contiguous to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, possibly the now site of Windmill court. J. T. Smith's quarto etching, entitled ' ' Old Houses at the south corner of Hosier lane, drawn in April, 1795," affords an admirable illustration of the Pie corner of Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fayre, a drama descriptive of its vagaries in 1614. Stow notices, " from Hosier lane to Cocke lane, over against Pie corner," the houses of the Elizabethan period thus faithfully detailed in the etching.

The fire of 1666 progressed northward to Cock lane corner, on the 4th of September, and was there subdued. Pepys, in his Diary that day, mentions the house of Mr. Hewer's mother " at Pie corner, being burned, so that the fire is got so far that way." A carved naked boy, as Pennant describes him, " represented wonderfully fat indeed !" was set up at the north corner of Cock lane, to commemorate the fire of London as being occasioned by the sin of gluttony ; the boy is still in statu quo, but the lying inscription has long been obliterated by the painter's brush, although its propriety was formerly thus supported from the pulpit : a nonconforming parson, preaching on the anniversary of the fire of London, asserted that " the calamity could not be occasioned by the sin of blasphemy, for in that case it would have begun at Billingsgate ; nor lewdness, for then Drury lane would have been first on fire ; nor lying, for then the flames had reached them from Westminster Hall ; no, my beloved, it was occasioned by the sin of gluttony; for it began at Pudding lane, and ended at Pie corner."

#910 FRANCIS HARRIS. BAKER A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev. AT PYE CORNER . HIS 1/2 PENNY F. M. H.

Francis Harris, baker at Pye Corner, his halfpenny

Francis Harris, baker at Pye Corner, his halfpenny

The Great Fire of London began at the house of a baker, named Farriner, in “Pudding Lane,” and ended at “Pie Corner,” whence the Puritans of the day attributed that great calamity to “the detestable sin of gluttony,” an absurdity recorded on the bloated figure of a boy against the wall of a house in Giltspur Street, West Smithfield.
Pie Corner seems to have received its designation from the trade which thrived in that neighbourhood, Robin Conscience, in his ballad, finding that his name offended the traders in various parts of London, came hither.
“ Thus chid of them, my way I took
Unto Pye Corner, where a cook
Glanced at me as the devil would look
O’er Lincoln.”
By which we are led to suspect that the cook either dispensed short weight, or viands of an apocryphal character. —Akerman.

#911 JOHN MARSTON. TALLOW Half-moon, and seven stars.
Rev. CHANPLER IN PYE CORNER HIS HALFE PENY.

The sign, the Half-moon and Seven Stars, rendered terrestrial by the agglomeration of a stick of candles.

B2248. Obverse. Adam . Everell = A horseshoe.
R. IN . PY . CORNER = A . E. 1/4

B2251. Obverse. John . Marston . pye . corner = A half-moon, seven stars, and a string of candles.
R. TALLOW . CHANDLER . 59 = 1 . D . M. 1/4br>
B2252. Obverse. Sam . Parkins . mealman . at = A wheatsheaf.
R. PY . CORNER . WEST . SMITHFLDS = HIS HALFE PENY. S . M . P.

B2253. Obverse. Stephen . Willcocks . at = A pair of antlers.
RR. spy . corner . brewhovse = s . w divided by flowers.


PISSING ALLEY.

B2254. Obverse. Daniell . Hills = A full-blown rose crowned.
R. IN . PISSING . ALLEY = D . C . H. 1/4

B2255. Obverse. Francis . Wood . at . ye = The King’s head.
R. IN . PISSING . ALLEY . 1664= F . A . W. 1/4


POPE’S HEAD ALLEY (Cornhill).

B2256. Obverse. John . Sawyer . in = The bust of a pope.
R. POPESHEAD . ALLEY = I . E . S. 1/4

“ Pope’s Head Alley, leading into Cornhill. After the Great Fire, it is stated by Strype that the Alley was chiefly inhabited by toy-shop keepers and cutlers. There was a famous tavern here called the Pope’s Head ; it was at this tavern in 1464 that a great contest took place between an Alicant goldsmith and an English goldsmith as to which was the most cunning in the craft of goldsmithery. It resulted in favour of the Englishman. The house is frequently mentioned in contemporary literature, but for the present we will be content with what Pepys writes in his ‘Diary’ of November 27, 1665, as in it he mentions the name of two goldsmiths : ‘ So to Viners (it was 6 o’clock) and there heard of Cccke and found him at the Popes Head drinking with Temple. I to them where the goldsmiths do decry the new act, for money to be all brought into the Exchequer, and paid out thence, saying they will not advance one farthing upon it, and indeed it is their interest to say and do so.’ It would have been better for them had they adhered to this resolution.”—Mr. F. G. Hilton Price in the Journal of the Institute of Bankers, May, 1886, part v., vol. vii., p. 344.


POPPING’S ALLEY (Poppin’s Court, Fleet Street).

B2257. Obverse. Simon . penycott . green = A dragon.
R. IN . POPENG . ALLEY = S . D . P. 1/4


PORTER’S QUAY.

B2258. Obverse. THE . REDE . HOVSE=W . E . H.
R. AT . PORTERS . KEEK = W . E . H. 1/4

B2259. Obverse. RICH . SMITH . AT . THE . RED = HIS HALF PENY.
R. hovse . at . porters . key = A building with a cross at each gable.


POSTERN GATE, Cripplegate.

In King William the First's grant of certain land and moor to the collegiate church of St. Martin-le-grand, in 1067, " the postern which is called Cripelesgate" is particularized in the demarcation of the boundary.

The postern-gate was immediately opposite the end of Aldermanbury.

#912 ROBERT SARRESON In the field, the postern gate. br> Rev. IN THE POSTORNE R. E. S., in the field.

POSTERN STREET.

B2271. Obverse. Hugh . Look . at . ye . white = A hart lodged, H. E. L.
R. IN . POSTERNE . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1666.


POULTRY.

" Poulterers in the olden time dwelt and sold poultry at their stalls in the high street from Stocks market to the great conduit. The street doth yet bear the name of the Poultry, and the poulterers are but lately departed from thence into other streets, as lately into Grasse street, and the end of St. Nicholas flesh shambles." Stow, edit. 1598.

#913 AT THE ROSE TAVERN A rose, in the field.
Rev. IN THE POULTREY In the field, T. E. D.  [Thomas Dyott doubtless issued ?] 1/4

B2275. Obverse. THOMAS . DYOTT . AT . THE . ROSE = A full-blown rose.
R. TAVERN IN . THE . POULTRY = HIS HALFE PENNY.

Machin, in his Diary, January 5th, 1560, thus mentions the Rose tavern : "A gentleman arrested for debt ; Master Cobham, with divers gentlemen and serving-men, took him from the officers, and carried him to the Rose tavern, where so great a fray, both the sheriffs were feign to come, and from the Rose tavern took all the gentlemen and their servants, and carried them to the compter."

Richard Smith, in his manuscript Obituary, notices, " October 30th, 1649, died Mr. William Bowyer, vintner, in the Poultry. Old Mrs. Bowyer, widow, aged 86 years, on November 6th, 1672 ; buried February 25th, 1673, in St. Mildred's church in ye Poultry, where her husband, William Bowyer, alias Gamble, vintner at the Rose, sometime lived." She died in Co vent garden.

Ned Ward commends the Rose tavern in the Poultry, as in his time famous for good wine : " There was no parting without a glass, so we went into the Rose tavern in the Poultry, where the wine according to its merit had justly gained a reputation, and there in a snug room warmed with brash and faggot, over a quart of good claret, we laughed over our night's adventure." London Spy, 1709.

#914 GEORGE TWINE. 1665 Three cranes erect, in the field.
Rev. IN THE POULTREY In field, HIS HALF PENY.

“ Sergeant Major Thorne Frank, having obtained Letters Patent from his Majesty for making of Furnaces, for melting or smelting all manner of Metals out of their Oares, whereby great quantities of fuel and time may be saved ; . . . .  If any be desirous to speak with the said Major Frank, they may find him . . . .  upon Tuesdayes, Thursdayes and Saturdaies, at the three Cranes on the backside of the Royal Exchange London, from eleven of the clock untill two in the afternoon.”— Mercurius Publicus (August 29 to September 5, 1661), p. 552.

The Three Cranes tavern, destroyed in the fire of 1666, was rebuilt, and is noticed in 1698, in one of the many paper controversies of that day. A fulminating pamphlet, entitled " cdesia et Factio : a Dialogue between Bow church steeple and the Exchange Grasshopper," elicited " An Answer to the Dragon and Grasshopper : in a Dialogue between an Old Monkey and a Young Weasel, at the Three Crane Tavern in the Poultry."

#915 THE EXCHANGE TAVERN Quadrangle of the Royal Exchange.
Rev. IN THE POULTRY. 1671 W. K.

B2277. Obverse. the . Exchange . Tavern = A view of the Royal Exchange.
R. IN . THE . POULTREY . 1651 = W . K. 1/4

B2276. Obverse. the . Exchange . Tavern = A view of the Royal Exchange.
R. IN . THE . POULTREY . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY.

The Exchange tavern in the Poultrey, 1668, his halfpenny

The Exchange tavern in the Poultrey, 1668, his halfpenny

The arrival of Mary Moders, alias Stedman, as the German princess, at " the Exchange tavern, right against the Stocks, betwixt the Poultry and Cornhill, at five in the morning ; Mr. King being up, and standing at the bar telling of brass farthings ;" with her marriage to Carleton, the taverner's wife's brother ; are incidents fully narrated in Francis Kirkman's Counterfeit Lady Unveiled, 1673.

The view on the Obverse shows the north and east sides of the quadrangle of  the building, destroyed by fire in the night of January 13, 1838.—[B.]

“ An Impudent piece of Mortality coming from Dover, arrived lately in Great Bedlam , and coming to the Exchange Tavern in the Poultry, met with a freshwater Lad, who she ecrilled into fools Paradise.”—The Man in the Moon , No. 2 , 1663, p. 114.

B2272. Obverse. James . Baines . at . the = A sugar-loaf and three tobacco-rolls.
RR. IN . THE . POULTRY . 1659 = I . B. 1/4

B2274. Obverse. Henry . Dixon . in = A shield charged with a fess.
R. the. POULtry . 166o = The sun on an heraldic wreath. 1/4


PRINCES STREET.

B2279. Obverse. Ralph . Draper . at . the = The Blacksmiths’ Arms.
R. IN . PRINCES . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B2280. Obverse. THOMAS . SNELLING . OYLMAN = HIS HALFE PENNY.
R. in . princes . street = The Bakers’ Arms.

This issuer was probably an ancestor of Thomas Snelling, the antiquary.

B2281. Obverse. John . Rixon . at . the . sun = The sun.
R. IN . PRINCES . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY.


PUDDING LANE, Lower Thames Street.

Stow names it ' ' Rother lane, or Red Rose lane, of such a sign there : now (1598) commonly called Pudding lane, because the butchers of Eastcheape have their scalding-house for hogs there, and their puddings, with other filth of beasts, are voided down that way to their dung-boats on the Thames. This lane is chiefly inhabited by basket-makers, turners, and butchers."

At the April sessions, in 1666, at the Old Bailey, John Rathbone an old army colonel, and others, were found guilty of high treason, in having conspired to seize the Tower, and fire the city, the attempt having been determined on to take effect on the 3d of September ensuing, as being found by Lilly's almanack, and an astrological scheme, to be a lucky day for that purpose, a planet then ruling that prognosticated the downfall of monarchy. The evidence was declared to be clear and full, and their guilt established, so that Rathbone and the other prisoners were executed at Tyburn, on the 30th of that month. The London Gazette, April 30th, narrates the particulars of their trial and conviction ; and, notwithstanding the failure of the entire plot, enough of the conspiracy remained successfully to fire the city, and cause the most destructive conflagration on record. The London Gazettes of September 3d and 10th afford considerable details, and state that about one in the morning of Sunday September 2d, the fire commenced at the house occupied by Farriner, said to be the king's baker, in Pudding lane. The neighbourhood was a mass of pitched wooden houses, and a strong easterly wind prevailing, soon caused it to spread beyond the power of extinguishing it by means of engines; and the intensity of the heat rendered all manual operations near it impossible. There can be no doubt the fire was a premeditated popish affair, and accelerated by one day of the predicted time, by the opportune violence of the wind.

The persons appointed to survey the ruins after the fire certified that " the fire that begun in London upon the 2d of September, at one Farryner's house, a baker, in Pudding lane, between the hours of one and two in the morning, and continued burning until the 6th of that month, did overrun the space of three hundred and seventy-three acres and three roods within the walls. There remained seventy-five acres three roods standing within the walls unburned. Eighty-nine parish churches, besides chapels, were burned. Eleven parishes within the walls standing. Houses burned, thirteen thousand two hundred.

-Signed, JONAS MOORE, f g ors/ ,
" RALPH GATEIX, )

L'Estrange, in the Observator, May 18th, 1681, enters fully into the charges against Rathbone and the other conspirators, stimulated as there intimated by some confession that had been recently made by some person implicated in the original design.

#916 AT YE MAYDEN HEADE Mercers' arms, in the field.
Rev. IN PUDIN LANE. 1657 In the field, B. W. A.  1/4

B2282. Obverse. at . the . mayden heade = A bust of the Virgin.
R. IN . PUDIN . LANE . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. B . W . A.

B2286. Obverse. at . ye . mayden . heade = A rude female bust.
R. IN . PUDEN . LANE . 1657 = 1657.

B2284. Obverse. JOHN . HANDS . IN = I . M . H.
R. puding . lane . 1664 = Three sugar-loaves. 1/4

B2285. Obverse. AT . THE . BLACKE . BVLL = A bull.
R. IN . PUDDING . LANE = W . I . P. 1/4



PUDDLE DOCK, Blackfriars.

A property belonging to the authorities of the city of London that formerly conferred a distinguished title. ShadwelL, in his comedy of Epsom Wells, printed in 1676, mentions "the countess of Puddle dock." Hogarth, in May, 1732, with some companions as frolicsome as himself, having only an additional shirt in his pocket, started at midnight, from the Bedford Arms tavern, under the east piazza in Covent garden, on a tour, by the Gravesend hoy ; and, at the Dark house, Billingsgate, met with the no less eminent personage than " his grace" (the title having advanced in dignity) " the duke of Pud'dle dock," most facetiously drunk.
Hogarth, in an enthusiastic fit of inspiration, drew his pencil, and on the instant, caught

" The living manners as they rose.

The vraisemblance obtained general approval ; the portraiture was pasted against the cellar-door ; unhappily it has not been engraved ; and the title from some cause has become dormant. The duke of Puddle dock appears to have been a well-known character ; as in 1739 was printed, in folio, " The Popular Convention, a poem, by the duchess of Puddle dock."

#917 THO: BAKER AT THE. [16]59 Feathers, in the field.
Rev. NERE PVDLE DOCK . 16[59] In the field, T. A. B.

Thomas Grey [or Guy], in 1668, issued a half-penny token from the same house ; as the wife's Christian name is still A., it was possibly Baker's widow who had remarried.  It will be observed that the date is most curiously divided, the 59 being on the
Obverse, and the 16 on the reverse.

B2290. Obverse. Thomas . Guy . at . ye . feathers = Prince of Wales’s crest.
R. AT . PVDLE . WHARFE . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. T . A . G. 1/4

The precinct of the Black Friars was formerly distinguished as the abode of many zealous puritans, and for the sale of feathers, the two professions being often rather inconsistently united in the same person. In Randolph's Muse's Looking-glass, Bird, the featherman, and Mrs. Flowerdew, are described as two of the
sanctified fraternity of Blackfriars.

#918 ROBERT HALE AT PUDLE HIS HALFE PENY, in the field.
Rev. DOCK . CHANDLER . 1662 In the field, R. M. H.

B2288. Obverse. KINGS . COLLEDG = 1660.
R. PUDDELL . DOCKE = R . C.

B2289. Obverse. Francis . Elwood = Detrited.
R. AT . PUDLE . DOC . HILL = F . I . E. 1/4

B2292. Obverse. Samuel . Harris . at . ye . corn = The Tallowchandlers’ Arms.
R . OF . PUDLEDOCK . HILL = HIS HALFE PENY. 1669.

B2293. Obverse. Benjamen . Howe . in . Thames = St. George and the Dragon.
R. STREET . AT . PUDDLE . WHARF = HIS HALFE PENNY. B . E . H.

B2294. Obverse. ELIZABETH . JORDEN . AT . YE = A Still.
R. STILL . AT . PUDDLE . DOCK = HER HALF PENY. 1669.

B2295. Obverse. JOHN . OSMAN . 1664 = I . M . O.
R. AT . PUDLE . DOCK = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2296. Obverse. John . Rogers . at . ye . white = A swan standing on a shuttle.
R. SWAN . AT . PUDELL . DOCKE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2297. Obverse. at . the . brew . hovse = The City Arms.
R. at . pudle . dock = 1D . R . S. (small 1


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As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

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