Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Abchurch lane to Ave Maria Lane

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.

Letter A - Abchurch lane to Ave Maria Lane

Abchurch lane, Lombard Street.

B1. Obverse. at . the . lion . in = A lion passant.
R. ABCHURCH . LANE . 1649 = T . A . C.   farthing

B2. Obverse. NATHANIEL . GOOSLY = A wheatsheaf.
R. IN . ABCHURCH . LANE . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY.

White Bear, Abchurch lane
#76 RALPH LUCAS AT THE WHIT A bear, in the field.
Rev. IN ABCHURCH LANE .  1665 HIS HALF PENY.

The White-Bear tavern was destroyed in the great fire of September 1666, but, on the rebuilding, the proximity of the situation for all purposes of business
induced a Frenchman, described by Evelyn as " M. Pontack, the son of the President of Bordeaux, owner of a district whence are imported to England some of the most esteemed claret," to establish a tavern with all the novelties of French cookery, that soon obtained popularity under the appellation of Pontack's. Proud of his descent, he set up his father's head as a sign, as possibly more attractive than his own, and, doubtless being painted in official costume, soon became noticed as the Pontack's Head. Evelyn, in July 1683, however, seems to have thought the son no conjuror, and to nave considered his acquirements of but ordinary capacity ; as he observes, " I think I may truly say of him, what was not so truly said of St. Paul, that much learning had made him mad."

The fellows of the Royal Society, after the Fire, held their anniversary dinner on November 30th, at the Crown tavern in Threadneedle street ; but for some cause, possibly more scientifically cooked viands, moved to the Pontack's Head ; and in 1694, Evelyn again records, " we all dined at Pontack's as usual."

A scarce tract, entitled " The Metamorphoses of the Town, 1731," sufficiently attests the character of Pontack's as the resort at that period of extravagant epicures, and, in the bill of fare of "a guinea ordinary," figure "a, ragout of fatted snails," and "chickens not two hours from the shell." The tavern appears to have been at this period conducted by a female, as the Weekly Oracle records ; on "Thursday, January 15th, 1736, William Pepys, banker in Lombard street, was married at St. Clement's church in the Strand, to Mrs. Susannah Austin, who lately kept Pontack's, where with universal esteem she acquired a considerable fortune."

Abchurch lane would seem to have been long known for its contributions towards good living. Frisco, in Haughton's Englishmen for my Money, played in 1598, says " I have the scent of London Stone as full in my nose, as Abchurch lane of Mother Walle's pasties. Sirs, feele about, I smell London Stone." Edit. 1616, 4to, sign. Gl.

Respecting Mother Wall's pies, see Sandys's Festive Songs, pp. xlvi. and xlvii.

B4. Obverse. John . Milett . 1664 (in three lines).
R. IN . ABCHURCH . LANE = I . S . M. farthing

B5. Obverse. at . the . lambe . in = The Holy Lamb couchant.
R. ABCHURCH . LANE . 1649 = R • S . P. farthing

B6. Obverse. Avgvstine . Rand = A hand pouring from a coffee-pot into a cup.
R. IN . ABCHURCH . LANE = HIS HALF PENY.

B7. Obverse. at . the . whit . hart = A hart standing.
R. IN . ABCHURCH . LANE = D . I . S. farthing

B8. Obverse. at . the . black . horse = A horse saddled and bridled.
R. IN . ABCHURCH . LANE = W . A . T. farthing

ADDLE HILL, Upper Thames Street.

#77 CHARLES DEARE Sun in splendour; Distillers' arms.
Rev. AT ADLIN HILL In the field, C. E. D.

B9. Obverse. Charles . DEARE = The sun in rays.
R. AT . ADLIN . HILL = C . E . D. farthing

B10. Obverse. THOMAS . STEDMAN = The sun.
R. ON . ADDLE . HILL . 1656 = T . D . S. farthing

ADDLE STREET (Aldermanbury).

B11. Obverse. at . the . suger . lofe = A sugar-loaf between A . K.
R. IN . ADDELL . STREET = A . K.  farthing

B12. Obverse. Robert . Rhett . 1666 = A sugar-loaf,  R . K . R.
R. IN . ADLE . STREETE = HIS HALF PENY.  1/2

ST. ALBAN’S STREET.

B2444. Obverse. Georg . Carter . at . ye . ST . Alban = St. Alban standing near an altar.
R. IN . ST . ALBANS . STREET . NEERE . ST . JAMES . MARKET (in six lines).

ALDERMANBURY.

B13. Obverse. ROBERT . HILTON . IN = A ball.
R. ALDERMANBARY = R . M . H. farthing

B14. Obverse. John . iohnson . 1669 = A sieve.
R. IN . ALDERMANBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. I . S . I. 1/2

B15. Obverse. Ellener . Pricke = A lion passant.
R. IN . ALDERMANBERRY = E . P. farthing

ALDGATE.

Aldgate, built in 1606, was sold by the civic authorities, on Wednesday, July 30th, 1760, for 1771. 10s. The demolition began on September 4th, the Monday following, when some of the ornamental carvings, part of the city arms, with the heads and wings of the dragons, apparently cut in Portland stone, were obtained by Sir Walter Blackett, an eminent merchant at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and appropriated to the decoration of Rothley castle, an eye-trap, erected by him on the crags of that name, near Wallington, Northumberland.

#78 JOHN GAME AT THE COACH A coach : below it 1/2
Rev. AND HORSES AT ALLGATE The above repeated, in the field.

The Coach-and-Horses was a sign adopted by hackney-coach proprietors, who, by an ordinance of the Lord Protector, with the advice of his council, June 23d, 1654, were not, within London, Westminster, and six miles about the late lines of communication, to exceed at any time two hundred persons ; the hackney-coaches used by them, not more than three hundred ; nor their hackney horses for coaches to exceed six hundred. The entire direction, as to places of standing, rates of feres, and rules of governance, was vested in the Court of Aldermen of the City of London ; provided the ordinance did not extend to the prejudice or restraint of any coaches commonly called stage-coaches, coming to, or going from London to remote places.

May 1, 1663. “ I, upon a horse hired of Mr. Game , saw him (P.’s father) out of London, at the end of Bishopsgate .Streete, and so I turned and rode, with
some trouble, through the fields, and then Holborne, etc., towards Hide Parke.”
Further on, “ In my way in Leadenhall Streete, there was morris-dancing, which I have not seen a great while. So set my horse up at Game’s , paying 5s. for him.”—Pepys’ Diary.

#79 JOHN TIDDER [16]57 Three doves, from the Tallow-chandlers arms.
Rev. WITHIN ALDGAT I. A. T. ALDGATE HIGH STREET.

#80 DAVID GILLATT AT THE PYE A magpie, in the field.
Rev. WITHOUT ALGATE . 1671 In the field, D. G. I.

On the 16th April, 1672, at Aldgate, a birth is registered of a David Gillett, son of David Gillett and his wife, Mary Gillett

On the 3rd November, 1678, at Aldgate, a burial is registered of a David Gillatt, vintner, at Ye Pye Tavern a Aldgate.

A token was issued from " the Pye without Algate" so early as 1648, and the initials of the taverner and his wife on the reverse were then W. A. G.
In 1661 was printed "The Presbyterian Lash, or Noctroffs Maid Whipp'd; a tragi-comedy, as it was lately acted in the great roome at the Pye Tavern at Algate." This bitter satire had allusion to ZACHABY CROFTON, a violent Presbyterian leader, who was accused of whipping his maid for some supposed fault she had committed ; and had the effrontery to print a defence of his conduct. See White Kennett's Chronicle, p. 797 ; and Butler's Hudibras, edit. 1764, vol. i. p. 354.
De Foe, in his Memoirs of the Plague, 1665, notices in particular "the Pye Tavern, over against the end of Houndsditch." He describes the dreadful set of fellows who there kept late hours in a room next the street ; and, as the dead-cart passed, followed by grieving persons, whose relations were being borne to the great pit then opened in the churchyard, assailed them by jeers and raillery that no remonstrance could abate : yet, ere a fortnight had elapsed, all were themselves thrown lifeless corpses into the same hole, and he who was most forward and most loud in his imprecations and scoffs was the first to pass to " that bourne from whence no traveller returns."
The Pie, now called the Magpie, is a contraction of the words fe maggoty -pie," deduced from the French word magot, implying a caprice, a whim, or a fancy ; an appellation the Pie appears to have obtained from the whimsicality of its drolleries.

[There is a Magpie at New street, Bishopsgate, in Aldgate parish, by 1800, but this is an entirely different site. John Lockie, in 1810, describes this as :New Street, Bishopsgate Street, at 30, the second on the Right north from the church, it leads to the India Companys warehouse.]

#81 SIMON TURNER NEXT A magpie, in the field.
Rev. THE PIE AT ALGATE Grocers Company arms.

B68. Obverse. Simon . Turner . next = The Grocers’ Arms.
R. the . pie . at . algate=A magpie; above, 1D

B69. Obverse. Simon . Turner . next = A magpie.
R. the . pie . at . algate = The Grocers’ Arms.
The usual farthing size. Turner also issued a token for one penny.

In March 1699, there is a SIMON TURNER, aged 40 buried in Bishopsgate. His will refers to him as a  Skinner (this is probably not the Simon Turner at the Pye / Magpie. He married Mary Cook in 1654 at Aldgate.).

#82 AT THE HARTS HORNS Horns affixed to scalp, in field.
Rev. WITHOUT ALL-GATE In the field, E. D. T.

#83 ROBERT WARD Lion rampant, in the field.
Rev. WITHOUT ALL-GATE In the field, R. A. W.

#84 GABRIELL HARPER In field, angel winged, bearing scroll.
Rev. WITHOUT ALLGAT [16]59 A bunch of grapes.

#85 GABRIELL HA[R]PER In the field, an angel, as above.
Rev. WITHOUT ALLGAT [16]59 A bunch of grapes.

The R in the surname on obverse omitted in error by the die sinker.

B67. Obverse. John . Langham . at . the = The Grocers’ Arms.
R. gun . at . algate=A cannon.

Vide No. 88.

B70. Obverse. at . the . kings . head = Bust of Charles I. crowned.
R. TAVERN . IN . algate = (Detrited).

ALDGATE WITHIN.

B71. Obverse. at . the . george . within = St. George and the dragon.
R. ALL . GATTE . l649 = N . E . B.

B72. Obverse. at . the . saresens . head = A Saracen’s head.
R. WITHIN . ALGATE . CHANDLER = R . S . B.

B73. Obverse. RICHARD . DRAPER = A globe.
R. WITHIN . ALLGATE = R . D . D.

B74. Obverse. WIL . FORDE . AT . THE . BEARE = A bear.
R. WITHIN . ALGATE = W . A . F.

B75. Obverse. AT . THE . SVNN . TAVERNE = The Sun.
R. WITHIN . ALLGATE = T . K . I.

B76. Obverse. THE . BLEW . BELL . WITHIN = A bell.
R. ALLGATE . MELL . MAN = H . E . L.

B77. Obverse. AT . Ye . MYTER . TAVERNE = A mitre.
R. WITHIN . ALGATE = H . S . N.

B78. Obverse. Robert . Pond . at . the . whit = A lion rampant.
R. WITHIN . ALDGATE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY.

B79. Obverse. ROBERT . TAYLOR . AT . THE = A castle.
R. WITHIN . ALLGATE . 1666 = HIS HALFE PENY. R . E.

B81. Obverse. at . y e . horshooe = A horseshoe.
R. WITHIN . ALGATE = T . E . W.

B82. Obverse. RICHARD . WALTON . AT . Y E = A Still.
R. STILL . WITHIN . ALGAT = R . T . W.

ALDGATE WITHOUT.

B83. Obverse. DOROTHY . ATCHESON . CHES = The Sun.
R. monger . WITHOUT . algat = A trumpet, and D . A.

B84. Obverse. Ric . aylett . at . the = A rose and crown.
R. WITHOUT . ALLGATE = R . E . A.

B85. Obverse. RICHARD . BRADLE ... = A Stirrup.
R. Ye . WITHOUT . ALDGATE = R . A . B.

B86. Obverse. at . the . gune . 1659 = A cannon.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE = W . A . D.

B89. Obverse. David . Gryer . at . the = A checkered square.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE . 1667= HIS HALF PENY.

B91. Obverse. at . the . pye . WITHOUT = A magpie.
R. ALGATE . 1648 = W . A . I.

B92. Obverse. THOMAS. INGRAME = A harrow.
R. WITHOUT . ALL . GATE = A plough.

B93. Obverse. John . Johnson . without = The Merchant-Tailors’ Arms.
R. ALGATE . NEAR . WHIT . CHAPPELL . CHURCH . HIS . HALF . penny (in six lines). ( Octagonal .)

B94. Obverse. Andrew . kildermore = An anchor and heart.
R. ALLGATE . WITHOUT = A . E . K.

B95. Obverse. JOH . QuICK . IN . HIGH . STRET = A bell.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE . 1 665 — HIS HALF PENY.

B96. Obverse. THOMAS . SLIGHTHOLME = A castle.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE = A Castle.

B97. Obverse. Tho . Sparke . at . the = A cauldron.
R. WITHOUT . ALLGATE = T . M . S.

B98. Obverse. Thomas . Thacker . at . the = A bladebone.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. T . S . T.

B99. Obverse. John . Vertue . at . the . red = A lion rampant between I . V.
R. WITHOUT . ALDGATE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY.

B100. Obverse. AT . THE . BLEW . BELL = A bell.
R. WITHOUT . ALL . GATE = C . W.

B102. Obverse. THO . WITHERS . AT . THE = A lady.
R. WITHOUT . ALGATE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. T . M . W. 1/2

ALDERSGATE STREET.

Aldersgate, whence many of John Daye the printer's most rare productions issued in the sixteenth century, was sold by the civic authorities, on Wednesday, April 22d, 1761, for 9l., and the demolition commenced in the following week. The site where it stood is marked, on the east side of the street, by 62, St. Martin's-le-grand.

#86 JOSEPH COLLET IN A bucket, or milk-pail, in the field.
Rev. ALDERSGATE STREET In the field, I. M. C.

#87 THE SWAN AND SVGAR Swan and sugar-loaf, in field.
Rev. IN ALDERSGATE STREET In the field, C. S. I.

The sugar-loaf, like Abel Drugger's bona roba's cap, " all o' cop," indicated that the issuer was a grocer.

#88 RICHARD DOWLEY In field, the Salters Company arms.
Rev. NEAR ALDERSGATE Same coat impaled with the arms of Dowley.

B30. Obverse. Richard . DOWLEY = The Salters’ Arms.
R. near . aldersgate = A chevron between three birds impaling a cross flory between four martlets.

“A Bright bay mare, with a white face and two wall Eyes and 2 white feet be-hind, about 6 years old, and 14 handfull high or there about, was lost from Hallaughton, in Leicester-shire: If any one can give notice to Richard Dowley , next to the Plow without Aldersgate ...» they shall have twenty shillings for their pains.”—The Kingdoms Intelligencer., No. 35,
August 26, to September 2, 1661, P- 553 -

#89 WALTER JONES IN ALDERSGA Seven stars, in the field.
Rev. STREET . His HALFE PENY Name in monogram.

#90 Sultan Solyman's head Solyman, in the field.
Rev. The Coffee House in Aldersgate Street, 1666.

Evidently a coffee-house keeper's token, issued on re-establishing his business here, after the fire in September. Possibly Ward, who adopted the same sign and issued a similar token, on his removal to Bread street in 1671.

Solyman the Magnificent, the fourth emperor of the Turks, began his reign in 1520, in the same year Charles the Fifth became emperor of Germany. He was the contemporary of Henry the Eighth, Edward the Sixth, Mary, and Elizabeth. Solyman died September 4th, 1566. The distinctive splendour of his rule appears to have caused his name to be adopted as the frequent subject of a sign where Turkey coffee was sold.

No doubt this is the coffee-house mentioned by Ned Ward in his “ London Spy,” 1718 (originally published in 1698), part ii., p. 275 :

“ Having heard of a fam’d Coffee-House in Aldersgate-Street, where Doctors of the Body .... Metamorphose themselves into State Politicians ; and the slippery tongues of thoughtless Mechanicks, undertake to Expound the Mysteries of Scripture .... Thither accordingly we steered our Course, and entered the Ancient Fabrick, by Antiquity made Venerable.”

#91 NICHOLAS COOKE GROCER AT Ye  A cock, in field.
Rev. COCK IN ALDERSGAT STREETE HIS PENNY. 1666.

The diurnals, in January 1762, noticed the death of " Mrs. Wilks, widow, mistress of the Cock inn in Aldersgate street, judged to be one of the biggest women in England."

#92 ROGER WALLMAN AT THE A horse, in the field.
Rev. ALDERSGATE STREET [16] 66 HIS HALFE PENY.

Query, the Black Horse ? that sign being still there.

#93 MICHAELL SYMONDS AT THE A still, in the field.
Rev. IN ALDERSGATE STREET HIS HALFE PENNY.

Symonds was a distiller; the still being a prominent symbol in the Distillers Company arms.

#94 THO. GROVE . CHEESMONGER A weight, T. E. G.
Rev. IN ALDERSGATE STREET HIS HALFE PENNY . 1668.

#95 THE MAIDEN HEAD Virgin's head on shield, E. A.
Rev. IN ALDERSGATE STREET Same device, [16] 68.

B16. Obverse. the . maiden . head = The Mercers’ Arms, E . A.
R. in . aldersgat . sireet = The Mercers’ Arms. 68 1/2

The Maidenhead was possibly, in more instances than one, set up in compliment to Queen Catharine Parr, the sixth and last wife of King Henry the Eighth. Previous to her marriage with that monarch, the Parr family assumed as one of  their badges, derived from the family of Ros of Kendal, the device of a maiden's head couped below the breast, vested in ermine and gold ; her hair of the last, or; and her head encircled with a wreath of red and white roses.
The head is found on the Pinmakers Company arms, with the motto,
" VIRGINITAS ET UNITAS NOSTRA AETERNITAS."

#96 JOHN WARNER IN. 1668 A bell, below a dolphin.
Rev. ALDERSGATE STREETHIS HALFE PENNY. I. A. W.

The sign indicated was the Bell and Dolphin.

#97 JOHN MYNN St. George and the Dragon, in the field.
Rev. ALDERSGATE WITHOUT In the field, I. M. M.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, Sloane MS. 886, notices, " May 15th, 1634, Richard Lawley, innkeeper at the George without Aldersgate, buried." The Mercurius Politicus, a newspaper, dated April 8th, 1658, announced coaches from the George inn without Aldersgate, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Smith subsequently records, ''September 14th, 1670, Mrs. Mary Mynn, wife to Mr. John Mynn, grocer, without Aldersgate, died at two a.m. Buried 17th." Grocer implied the company to which he belonged. The George was an inn having that sign.

John Mynn was of the family of Mynn, booksellers, in Little Britain, who for the most part perished of the plague, in 1665. By the marriage of his cousin Dayrell to one of the Mynns, the latter family became connected with that of Richard Smith.

B17. Obverse. at . the . 7 . stars . in = Seven stars.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET = R . D . A.

B18. Obverse. AT . THE . TUNN . IN = A tun.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET = T . E . A.

B19. Obverse. John . Andrewes . at . Ye = A bulls head.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = I . A. 1666.

B20. Obverse. Richard . Awnsham . 1667 = A swan between R . A.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B21. Obverse. the . mermayde . tavern = A mermaid.
R. AT . ALDERS . GATE . 165 I = I . B.

B22. Obverse. John . bo... . brewer = Three crowns.
R. IN . ALDERS .GATE . 1650 = I . A . B.

B23. Obverse. and . svgar . loaf . 1656 = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. IN . ALDERGATE . STREET = T . B.

B24. Obverse. William . Bookham . at . the = A bugle-horn, stringed.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B25. Obverse. Jacob . Camfeild . at . ye . blew = An anchor.
R . IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B26. Obverse. Joseph . Collet . in = A soap-box.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET = I . M . C.

B28. Obverse. Thomas . Damsell . at . YE = The Mercers’ Arms.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET . COOKE = HIS HALFE PENY. 1667.

B29. Obverse. JOHN . DEAKES . AT . YE . COCK . INN = A Cock.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1669.

The diurnals, in January, 1762, noticed the death of “ Mrs. Wilks, widow, mistress of the Cock inn in Aldersgate Street, judged to be one of the biggest Women in England.”—[B.]

B31. Obverse. JOHN . DRAPER . AT . Ye . BLACK = A bull. I . A . D.
R. IN. ALDERSGATE. STREETE = HIS HALFE PENY.

B32. Obverse. Richard . Finch . at . ye . leg . and = A leg surmounted by a star.
R. STAR . WITHOUT . ALDERSGATE = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B33. Obverse. JOHN . FISH . IN . ALDERSGATE = A dolphin.
R. street . his . half . penny = An anchor.

B34. Obverse. THO . GROVE . CHEESMONGER = A weight, and T . E . G.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1668.

B35. Obverse. AT . THE . SONN . TAVERN = The Sun.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREETE = R . S . H.

B36. Obverse. Mathew . Hutchinson . with = A fountain.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . HIS . HALF . PENY = M . A . H.

B37. Obverse. Mathew . Hutchinson = A fountain.
R. Within . ALDERSGATE = M . A . H.

B38. Obverse. the . swan . and . sugar = A swan ; over it a sugar-loaf.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = G . S . I.

B39. Obverse. AT . THE . BELL = A bell.
R. AT . ALDERSGATE = R . A . I.

B41. Obverse. Will . Knight . his . 1/2 D . token = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. in . Aldergate . street. [16]71 = A horse passant.

B42. Obverse. Will . Leamon . at . the = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = W . A . L.

B43. Obverse. John . Lisle . at . the . 3 = Three morris-dancers.
R . IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . A . L.

B44. Obverse. THOMASON . MACE . IN = HIS 1/2
R. Aldersgate . street = A full-blown rose under a rainbow.

B45. Obverse. Peter . Mortimer . in = An anchor.
R. ALDERSGAT . STREET = P . M . M.

B47. Obverse. John . Norton . in . 1667 = A magpie. I . I . N.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENY.

B48. Obverse. the . dagger . in . nev . rents = A dagger erect.
R. MARTINS . ALLDERSGATE = I . S . p.

B49. Obverse. 10 . read . at . the . 3 . crownd . nedls = Three needles crowned.
R. IN. ALDERSGATE. STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1669.

B50. Obverse. Henry . Ruddle . in . 1666 = A boy on a barrel. H . B . R.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREETE = HIS HALFE PENNY.

51. O. (Detrited).
R. WITHIN . ALDERSGATE = P [or R] . M . S.

B52. Obverse. JOHN . SHARPE . IN = 1662.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET = I . S.

B53. Obverse. Thomas . Singleton . in = A sheaf between two branches.
ALDERSGATE . STREETE=T . I . S. ]

B54. Obverse. Michaell . Stancliffe . Hosier . 1667. 1/2 (in four lines).
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = A castle.

B55. Obverse. THO . STONE . AT . YE . CASTLE = A Castle.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET — T . S. }

B56. Obverse. MICHAELL . SYMONDS . AT . THE = A Still.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B57. Obverse. ANN . TAYLER . A . POTTERS . SHOP . IN (in four lines).
ALDERSGATE . STREET . HER . HALF . PENY (in five lines).

B58. Obverse. William . Thorpe = A half-moon.
R. IN . ALDERSGAT . STREET = W . T.

In Mercurius Democritus, or, The Smoaking Nocturnal, No. 2, Tuesday, May 28, 1661, there is mention of “ The old Sow that sells Oysters at the Half-moon Tavern in Aldersgate Street.”

The Half Moon in Aldersgate Street, was one of William Wycherley’s favourite taverns.—Vide Literary Landmarks of London, p. 323.

B59. Obverse. Roger . Wallman . at . the = A horse.
R. ALDERSGATE . STREET . 66 = HIS HALFE PENY.

Query the Black Horse, that sign being there in 1855 (?).

B61. Obverse. Nicholas . warrin = A hare running.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STRET = N . I . W.

B62. Obverse. THO . WEARG . AT . THE = T . M . W.
R. svnn . tar . in . aldergt . street = The sun in rays.

B63. Obverse. Mathew . White . at . the = A cock, a bottle, and a crown.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. M . A . W. 1/2

In the London Gazette, May 28, 1668, there is an advertisement of a certain Egbertus Wills, healer of deformed bodies : “ He is to be found at Mr. White’s house at the Cock and Bottle, in Aldersgate Street.”

B64. Obverse. John . Wickins . 1667 = A mermaid.
R. IN . ALDERSGATE . STREETE = HIS HALFE PENNY.

ANGEL ALLEY, Thames Street.

#98 OBADIAH SVRRIDGE IN ANGELL An angel with wings.
Rev. ALLY IN THAMES STREET . 1668 HIS HALFE PENY. O. A. S.

ANGEL STREET.

#99 IOHN ABETHELL Seven stars, in the field. 
Rev. IN ANGELL STREET In the field, I. A. A.

Angel street was possibly that in Southwark.

ST. ANN'S LANE, Aldersgate Street.

#100 MATHEW HANSCOMBE Sugar-loaf, in the field.
Rev. IN ST. ANNS LANE.[16]58 In the field, M. A. H.  1/4

#1100 NICH : STRAINGE . AT Ye COFFEE Turk's head, in field.
Rev. HOUSE . IN ST ANNS LANE [16] 69 In the field, hand pouring coffee.

B2446. Obverse. JOHN . HARRIS . IN = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . H.
R. St . Ans . lane . 1671 = A mermaid.

B2448. Obverse. John . TAYLER = An ape playing the bagpipes.
R. in . St . Anns . lane = A pair of spectacles. 1/4

B2449. Obverse. AT . YE . SYNE . OF . YE . MEARE = B . E . W.
R. maid . in . St . Ann . lane = A mermaid. 1/4

ST. ANN'S STREET, Westminster.

#101 RALPH FULLER IN s. Scales, Bakers' arms, in the field.
Rev. ANS STREET WESTMIN In the field, R. F. F.

ARUNDEL GARDENS (Strand).

B103. Obverse. Abraham . Cuper . 1666 = Cupid with bow and arrow.
R. IN . ARVNDEL . GARDEN = HIS HALFE PENNY. A . M . C.

AVE MARIA LANE, Ludgate Street.

#102 GODFREY ROBINSON Hawk with varvels, in the field.
Rev. IN AVE MARY LANE In the field, G. R. 1658.

Stow, describing the neighbourhood in 1603, observes that Ave Mary lane was ' so called, of text-writers and bead -makers then dwelling there ; and at the end of that lane is likewise Creede lane, late so called, but sometime Spurrier row,  of spurriers dwelling there." Artizans in matters of hawking, and the chace, afford a fair pretext for the sign of the falcon.

Next is the tokens of streets with  Letter B - Baldwins gardens to Birchin lane , then Letters Bish - Bishopsgate street

 

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As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

And Last updated on: Tuesday, 07-Jul-2020 19:06:44 BST