Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Fasson street to Fullers rents

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.

FALCONER’S ALLEY.

B970 . Obverse. JOHN . TURNER . IN . FAVLCONERS . ALLEY = HIS HALF PENY. 1668.
R. A falcon, armed, jessed, and belted, volant.


FASSON STREET, Spitalfields.

#443 RICHARD NICHOLSON IN FASSON In field, a roll of silk.
Rev. STREET . IN SPITTLEFEILDS HIS HALF PENY.

B971 . Obverse. Robert . Bosworth . in . fasson = A lion rampant.
R. STREETE . IN . SPITTLE . FEILDS = R . A . B. 1670.

Fasson has since been perverted to Fashion street.

FELL STREET (Cripplegate).

B973 . Obverse. Benjamen . Lawrence . ye . Success . in (in three lines) = A small ship.
R. fell . street . within . Criplegate . his . halfe . peny (in four lines). ( Octagonal .)


FENCHURCH STREET.

#444 AT THE MITETR [for MITRE] IN A mitre, in the field.
Rev. FENCHURCH STREETE In the field, D. M. R.

At the Mitre In Fenchurch street

At the Mitre In Fenchurch street

Daniel Rawlinson, citizen and vintner, and his wife Margaret, are the names implied by the initials. He appears to have been a staunch royalist. Dr. Richard Rawlinson, whose jacobitical principles are sufficiently on record, in a letter to Tom Hearne, the nonjuring antiquary at Oxford, says " of Daniel Rawlinson, who kept the Mitre tavern in Fenchurch street, and of whose being suspected in the Rump time I have heard much. The whigs tell this, that upon the king's murder, January 30th, 1649, he hung his sign in mourning : he certainly judged right ; the honour of the mitre was much eclipsed by the loss of so good a parent to the Church of England. These rogues [the whigs] say, this endeared him so much to the churchmen that he strove amain, and got a good estate."

Pepys, who expressed great personal fear of the plague, in his Diary, August 6th, 1666, notices that, notwithstanding Dan Rawlinson's being all the last year in the country, and the sickness in a great measure past, one of his men was then dead at the Mitre of the pestilence ; his wife Mar[garet] Rawlinson, and one of his maids, both sick, and himself shut up. Pepys adds " which troubles me mightily. God preserve us !" On the 9th, Pepys minutes " Mrs. Rawlinson dead of the sickness ; and her maid continues mighty ill : Rawlinson himself is got out of the house." On the 10th, " at Mr. Rawlinson's, the maid was then dead ; three corpses lying there at one time ; Mrs. Rawlinson, the man-servant, and a maid-servant*."

* Pepys, who is singularly minute in his Diary on all matters that provoked his inquiry, is not altogether correct in his statements in reference to the mortality of the Rawlinsons. A reference to the burial register of St. Dionis Backchurch, in Fenchurch street, shows that on the 6th of August, 1666, William Chomley, servant to Daniel Rawlinson, was not only dead, but that he was also buried on that day. Margaret, and not Mary, the wife of Daniel Rawlinson, and Elizabeth their servant, appear to have been interred at the same hour on the 9th, and were not above ground on the 10th, as Pepys, in his Diary, supposed.

The Rawlinsons were descended from the family formerly located at Graisdale in Lancashire. Daniel, the eldest son of Daniel Rawlinson, vintner, was buried on the 18th November, 1665. Daniel, the issuer of the token, died in his sixty-fifth year, in idibus quintilis, or the llth of July, 1679, and, according to the entry in the register, was buried in the middle aisle of St. Dionis Backchurch, below the stones numbered 4 and 6, on July 22d, in that year.

Rawlinson's tavern, the Mitre, appears to have been destroyed in the great fire of September, 1666, and immediately after rebuilt ; as Horace Walpole, from
Vertue's notes, observes that " Isaac Fuller was much employed to paint the great taverns in London ; particularly the Mitre in Fenchurch street, where he adorned all the sides of a great room, in pannels, as was then the fashion." Vertue, who had seen them, describes " the figures being as large as life ; over the chimney, a Venus, satyr, and sleeping Cupid ; a boy riding a goat, and another fallen down:" this was, he adds, " the best part of the performance. Saturn devouring a child, the colouring raw, and the figure of Saturn too muscular ; Mercury, Minerva, Diana, and Apollo ; Bacchus, Venus, and Ceres, embracing ; a young Silenus fallen down, and holding a goblet into which a boy was pouring wine. The Seasons between the windows, and on the ceiling, in a large circle, two angels supporting a mitre."

Fuller, who died in Bloomsbury square, July 17th, 1672, was however a wretched painter ; his colouring was raw and unnatural, and not compensated by disposition or invention; an opinion fully. borne out by Elsum's Epigram on a Dnmken Sot :

" His head does on his shoulder lean,
His eyes are sunk, and hardly seen :
Who sees this sot in his own colour
Is apt to say, 'twas done by Fuller."

#445 THE ANGELL TAVERN An angel, in the field.
Rev. IN FANCH . STREETE In the field, W. B.

The Angel yet remains at the Aldgate end, on the north side, of Fenchurch street.

On the north side of Fenchurch street, between where the Mitre stood and the Angel, is the sign of the Elephant originally it was the Elephant and Castle, " the pig and tinder-box," as some will have it; but the old house has passed away, and a new building has been erected on its site; the sign too, since 1776, is changed ; and for that change, tradition has assigned a rather droll reason. A former occupant was blessed with a shrewish rib, but she at length going the way of all flesh, he gave an entertainment on the occasion, and, to express his gratitude for such good fortune, said, that as his shoulders had been relieved of so great a burthen, he should do no less than also relieve those of his friend the elephant ; and accordingly had the castle expunged from the sign. The house has since been known as the Elephant in Fenchurch street ; and long may it continue so, for the weal of its tenant.

“ We adjourned to the sign of the Angel , in Fenchurch street, where the Vintner, like a double-dealing citizen, condescended as well to draw Carmen’s, comfort, as
the Consolatory Juice which Nature has bestow’d upon more deserving mortals.”—
Mr. Edward Ward’s “ London Spy,” p. 80, fifth edition, 1718 .

#446 IOHN BAKER . OYLEMAN Three oil-flasks, in the field.
Rev. IN FANCHURCH STREET In the field, I. B.

#447 BEN. BRANND GROCER A sugar-loaf, in the field.
R&O. IN FANCHURCH STREETE In the field, B. B.

Stow mentions " Sprinkle alley, now named Sugar-loafe ally, of the like sign ;" as the alley was a passage into Fenchurch street from Leadenhall street, the sign
of the Sugar-loaf was possibly that in Fenchurch street.

#448 THE FOVNTAIN TAVERN A fountain, in the field.
Rev. IN FANCHURCH STREETE In the field, W. A. K.

#449 RALPHE GARNER IN A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev.- FANCHURCH STREET In the field, R. E. G.

#450 AT THE WHEATSHEFE A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev. IN FANCHURCH STREETE In the field, I. A. G.

The wheatsheaf, as a sign by innkeepers, is derived from three wheatsheaves being among the charges emblazoned on the shield of the Innkeepers' arms.

#451 JOHN YOUNG STATIONER A stag's head, in the field.
Rev. IN FANCHURCH STREET HIS HALF PENY . I. Y.

#452 FRANC. TYLER . OYLMAN A bale of wool, in the field.
Rev. IN FENCHURCH STREET In the field, F. E. T.

B998 . Obverse. FRANCIS . TYLER . IN . FAN = HIS HALF PENY.
R. CHURCH . STREET . OYLMAN = A Woolpack ; On it F . T conjoined.
The bale of wool is a conspicuous charge in the Woolmen's Company arms.

#453 JAMES WAGGONER IN Man dipping candles, in the field.
Rev. FANCHURCH STREET . 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

B974 . Obverse. AT . THE . HATCHYT . IN = A hatchet.
R. FANCHURCH . STREETE = G . A . A. 1/4

B975 . Obverse. the . ship . taverne . in = A ship of war.
R. FANCHURCH . STREETE = R . E . B. 1/4


B978 . Obverse. Henry . Beebee . at . the = Three horseshoes.
R. IN . FANCHURCH . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B980 . Obverse. at . the . star . tavern = A blazing star.
R. IN . FAN . CHURCH . STREET = I . M . C. 1/4

B981 . Obverse. Emanvell . Conyers = A full-blown rose.
R. IN . FANCHURCH . STREET =E . C. 1/4

B982 . Obverse. Edward . Davis . grocer = A piece of ordnance.
R. IN . FANCHURCH . STREET = HIS HALF PENNY. 1669.

B983 . Obverse. Tobias . Davis . 1666 — A man holding a halbert.
R. IN . FENCHURCH . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1/2

B986 . Obverse. Roger . Grove . 1663 = A bear.
R. NEERE . FANCHURCH = R . E . G. 1/4

B987 . Obverse. BAKER . AT . FENCHURCH = T . E . H.
R. ye . kings . armes = The arms of England. 1/4

B988 . Obverse. IN . FENCHURCH . STREET = ANN . HEATH.
at . the . flower . de . luce = A fleur-de-lis. 1/4

B990 . Obverse. Jerom . Mathew . in = A barrel.
FANCHURCH . STREETE = I . T . M. 1/4

B991 . Obverse. John . Morris . at . excheng = A view of the Exchange.
R. IN . FANCHURCH . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1

B992 . Obverse. at . the . blew . bores = A boar’s head.
R. HEAD . AT . FENCHURCH = I . S . N. 1/4

B993 . Obverse. homfrey . pharo = A sugar-loaf.
R. BY . FANCHURCH . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY.

B995 . Obverse. James . Rudge . in = A ram’s head.
R. FANCHURCH . STREET = I . C . R. 1/4

B996 . Obverse. Henry . Seaward . 1668 = A ram’s head.
R. IN . FANCHURCH . STREET = HIS HALF PENY. 1/2

B997 . Obverse. Ambrose . Smith . at . y e = A fountain.
R. FANCHURCH . STREET = A . A . S. 1/4



FETTER LANE, Fleet Street.

Fetter lane was in the olden time called Feuter, or Feuterer's lane, from the French vautrier, or vaultrier, one who leads a lancehound or greyhound for the chace. Stow, writing at the close of Queen Elizabeth's reign, says " Fewter lane stretcheth south into Fleet street, by the east end of St. Dunstan's church, and is so called of fewters (or idle people) lying there, as in a way leading to gardens ; but the same is now of latter years, on both sides, built thro' with many fair houses."

#454 WILLIAM BURMAN A chequer, in the field.
Rev. IN FETTER LANE In the field, W. I. B.

Among the several attempts to explain the origin of the chequer as a tavern sign, are the following :

The checquers, still frequently seen at the doors of taverns, originated in the game of chess ; that, though not originally introduced into Europe by the Crusaders, was nevertheless certainly revived by them. Another writer states that in early times a chequered board, the emblem of calculation, was hung out to indicate an office or place for changing money. Afterwards it was adopted as the sign of a hostelry or inn, where strangers were lodged, entertained, and victuals were sold ; but the former appears to have greater probability.

#455 THOMAS DUTCH A dog and ball, in field.
Rev IN FETER LANE In the field, T. L. D.

#456 ROBERT LANGLEY AT THE A falcon, with expanded wings.

Rev. IN FETTER LANE In the field, R. I. L.

The Falcon was till recently on the west side of Fetter lane, but was demolished for the requirements of the new State Paper Office. The Falcon has been rebuilt on the opposite side, dropping the width of one house, nearer to Fleet street.

#457 AT THE GOOLLDEN LYON Lion rampant, in the field.
Rev. TAVERN IN FETTER LANE In the field, R. M. S.  1/4

#458 JOHN SMITH IN A mermaid, with the accessories.
Rev. FETTER LANE . 1654 In the field, I. K. S.

#459 ROBERT TOTHAKER IN R. E. T., in the field.
FETTER LANE . MEALMAN In the field, 1657.

#460 CLEMENT WILLCOCKS . AT THE St. Andrew's cross. C. E. W.
R. WHITE . CROSS . IN . FETTER . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1666.

The device on the token is in conformity to the arms attributed to St. Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland, and emblazoned upon the banner bearing his name, azure, a saltier argent.

#461 THOMAS POSLET HIS HALFE PENNY.
Rev. IN FETTER LANE . 1667 Floral device, and T. A. P.

#462 WILLIAM GARRETT IN A butt and still, in the field.
Rev. FETTER LANE .1667 HIS HALFE PENNY. W. M. G.

B1009 . Obverse. William . Garrett . = A still and a barrel.
R. FETTER . LANE = W . K . G. 1/4

#463 ROBERT RED WAY AT YE Lion rampant, in the field.
Rev. LION IN FETTER LANE HIS HALFE PENY.

The Red Lion. Captain Bedloe, in his Narrative of the Popish Plot, 1679, embodies the depositions on oath of the attempts by Papists, in August, 1670, to
fire the house of Robert Redway, victualler, in Fetter lane.

B1002 . Obverse. Ann . Brown . in = A tiger.
R. FETTER . LANE . 65 = A . B. 1/4

B1003 . Obverse. William . Burman=A checkered square.
R. IN . FETTER . LANE —W . I . B. 1/4

B1004 . Obverse. Robert . Cotterill = Cheesmonger.
R. in . fetter . lane = A horse prancing. 1/4

B1005 . Obverse. John . Cotton . at . y e . govlden = A lion rampant.
R. LYON . IN . FETTER . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . K . C.

B1006 . Obverse. in . fetter . lane . w . e . d (in five lines across the field).
R. (No legend.) A cock within a hoop.

B1007 . Obverse. Thomas . Dutch = A dog couchant, and a ball.
R. IN . FETER . LANE = T . I . D. 1/4

B1010 . Obverse. Henry, Gibbon . at . the = A falcon with expanded wings.
R. FALCON . IN . FETTER . LANE =1650. 1/4

B1011 . Obverse. James . Gould . in = A cock in a hoop.
R. FETTER . LANE . 1664 = I . S . G. 1/4

B1012 . Obverse. JOHN . HIGGS = I . M . H.
R. in . fetter . lane = A man dipping candles. 1/4

B1013 . Obverse. Thomas . Hill . at . the . black = An Indian holding a spear.
R. PRINCE . IN . FETTER . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. 1669.

B1014 . Obverse. John . Ivye . at . fetter . lane = A tree, and 1670.
R. end . next . fleet . streete = A chandler.

B1015 . Obverse. YARD . HEEL . MAKER = A falcon.
R. FETTER . LANE . MAGPY = G . P . L. 1/4

B1016 . Obverse. ROBERT . LANGBORNE = A falcon.
R. IN . FETTER . LANE = R . I . L. 1/4

B1017 . Obverse. Robert . langley . at . the = A falcon with expanded wings.
R. IN . FETTER . LANE = R . I . L.

B1018 . Obverse. THOMAS. POSLET = HIS HALFE PENNY.
R. IN . FETTER . LANE . 1667 = T . A . P.

B1021 . Obverse. John . Simcoe . in = A sugar-loaf.
R. FETTER . LANE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY.

B1022 . Obverse. John . Smith . in = A mermaid.
R. FETTER . LANE . 1654 = 1 . K . S. 1/4

B1023 . Obverse. AT . THE . SUGAR . LOAFE = A Sugar-loaf. 1/4
IN . FETTER . LANE = W . A . T.

B1024 . Obverse. ROBERT . TOTHAKER . IN = R . E . T.
R. fetter . lane . mealman =1657 (in ornamental figures).  1/4

B1026 . Obverse. MARGRET . YELVERTON . AT . YE = A COCK.
R. IN . FETTER . LANE . l668 = HER HALFE PENY.


FIELD LANE.

#464 AT THE GEORGE St. George destroying the dragon.
Rev. IN FEILD LANE In the field, I. A. G.  1/4

" St. George that swinged the dragon, and e'er since
Sits on his horse back at mine hostess' door." Old Ballad.  1/4

B1027 . Obverse. PEET . BECKFORD . IN . FEE . LAN = P . F . B.
R. at . the . gvy . of . worick = Guy Earl of Warwick holding a boar’s head on a spear.

It is an interesting question whether this issuer has any connexion with the following, who is mentioned in Pepys’ “ Diary/’ January I, 1668-9 : “ Presented from Captain Beckford with a noble silver warming-pan, which I am
doubtful whether to take or no.”
This Beckford, says Mr. Mynors Bright in his note on the passage, was probably one Peter Beckford, a slop-seller.

B1028 . Obverse. AT . THE . ROSE = T . C.
R. IN . FEILD . LANE = A rose. 1/4

B1029 . Obverse. Richard . Evans . at . y e . in = A rose and crown.
R. FEILD . LANE . TRIPEMAN . 68 = HIS HALFE PENY. R . E . E.

B1030 . Obverse. GODFREY. FOLIAMBE . l664 = COMFITT MAKER (in three lines).
R. AT . FILDE . LANE . CORNER = G . H . F. 1/4

 

FINCH LANE (Cornhill).

B1032 . Obverse. PHILLIP . CROSSE . AT . Y E . IERSY = A Castle.
R. CASTLE . IN . FINCH . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. P . A . C.

B1033 . Obverse. at . the . horse . shooe = A horseshoe.
R. IN . FINCH . LANE . 1652 = R . H. 1/4

B1034 . Obverse. Thomas . Ogden . at = A bust, with globe and sceptre.
R. TAVERNE . IN . FINCH . LANE = T . O. 1/4

B1035 . Obverse. Thomas . Stubs . in = A bull on a large horseshoe.
R. FINCH . LANE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY.

B1036 . Obverse. ROBERT . WILLIAMS = A goat.
R. IN . FINCH . LANE = R . M . W. 1/4



FINSBURY.

#465 JOHN HARGROVE IN Three fish, query, luces ? in field.
Rev. FINSBERRY . 1667 In the field, HIS HALF PENNY.

B1040 . Obverse. John . Margrove . in = Three fishes.
R. FINSBERRY . 1667= HIS HALF PENY.

#466 WILLIAM GODBEE His PENNY, in the field.
Rev. AT FINSBURY. 1671 In the field, a bell, and horse above.

The sign was " the Bell and Black Horse." In Richard Smith's Obituary is this notice : " Mrs. Read, at the Bell in Finsbury, died September 28th, 1658 ; buried October 2d."

John Harcourt issued, in 1668, a token from the Bell and Black Horse, at Finsbury ; and Smith's Obituary records " March 17th, 1668-9, Mrs. Hackett, (for Harcourt) wife to Mr. Hackett, innkeeper at the Bell in Finsbury, died sodenly." Godbee appears to have been Harcourt's successor, in the above year.

The token is of the large brass size, issued as a penny in currency.

#466* WALTER WITHERS IN Wheel of St. Catharine, in field.
Rev. FINSBURY . THROYSTER In the field, W. A. W.   1/4

B1039 . Obverse. John . Harcourt . at . ye . bel . and = A horse and bell.
R. BLACK . HORSE . AT . FINSBURY = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1668.

B1041 . Obverse. Robert . Nicholls . at . y e . dog = A dog and bear dancing.
R. AND . BEARE . IN . FINSBURY = HIS HALF PENY. 1668.

B1042 . Obverse. Sam . Nickolle = Two dogs dancing.
R. IN . FINSBURY = S . E . N.  1/4

B1043 . Obverse. John . Ruduck . at . fins = A Catherine-wheel.
R. BURY . WIERDRAWER = I . E . R.   1/4


FINSBURY YARD.

#467 EDMOND FLEEMING A scull, in the field.
Rev. IN FINSBURY YARD In the field, E. F.

B1037 . Obverse. ELENOR . FLEEMIN = A skull.
R. IN . FINSBURY . YARD = E . F.

The tokens having the skull appear to have been issued by some meditative apothecary. Yet, who's afraid ? in the language of Dean Swift's IMlibullero,

" Get thee gone, raw head and bloody bones.
Here is a boy that don't fear thee !"

OLD FISH STREET, Upper Thames Street.

#468 JOHN HOWELL A boar's head, in the field.
Rev. IN OLD FISH STREETE In the field, I. R. H.

" The Bore's Head in Old Fish street," as also the Swan, are among the many taverns of celebrity mentioned in Newes from Bartholomew Fayre, quoted by
Dr. Drake (Shakespeare and his Times, vol. ii. p. 133 n.) and of several of which there are tokens in the Beaufoy cabinet :

' ' There hath been great sale and utterance of wine, Besides beere and ale, and ipocras fine, In every country, region, and nation ; Chefely at Billingsgate, at the Salutation, And Bore's Head neere London Stone, The Swan at Dowgate, a taverne well knowne, The Miter in Cheape, and then the Bull Head, And many like places that make noses red ;

The Bore's Head in Old Fish street, Three Cranes in the Vintree,
And now of late St. Martin's in the Sentree ;
The Windmill in Lothbury*, the Ship at the Exchange,
King's Head in New Fish streete, where roysters do range ;
The Mermaid in Cornhill, Red Lion in the Strand,
Three Tuns, Newgate market; Old Fish street, at the Swan."

A cutting from a catalogue of Mr. Coleman, bookseller, in describing the will of John Thrale, vintner, 1582, says : “This is a very interesting will, he kept and was the owner of the Bore’s Hed in Old Ffishstrete, which he gives to his sonne John, and to his daughter Margarett 100 ounces of silver plate etc.”

“The Boar’s Head was by Indenture, Dec. 22, 1664, demised by Mary Thrale, widow, to Edmund Dixon.”—Akerman.

#469 AT THE SWAN TAVERN A swan, in the field.
Rev. IN OVLD FISH STREETE  In the field, I. A. M.

In an inquisition held before the mayor and aldermen, in 1413, 13 Hen. V., for clearly determining the boundaries of the old Fish market, " on the way called Old Fysshe strete," the tenement late of John Gayton, called the Swan on the Hoop, at the south-east corner of Old Fish street and Bread street, is noticed as the most eastern point on the south side.

The bill of an election feast of the Brewers Company, in 1425, has an item of payment of three pence each, for four assistants, borrowed from a tavern " on Fyshe-strete end ;" doubtless the Swan.

The house was frequented by Freemasons in the reign of Queen Anne .

“ At noon went by water with Mr. Mayl d . and Hales to the Swan in Fish Streete at our Coal Feast, where we were very merry at our Jole of Ling.”—Pepys’
Diary, January 20, 1659-60.

“ So to the Swan in Old Fish Street, where Mr Brigden and his father-in-law, Blackbury.”— lb., August 15, 1662.

The old house was destroyed in 1666, and rebuilt.

"The Swan tavern in Old Fish street, a noted well-accustomed house, the vaults most kindly and commodious, having the cellarage and all other offices extremely fit, and properly placed for use," was announced in the Spectator, April 25th, 1712, " to be lett, with or without stabling adjoining thereto."

#470 EDWARD BETTERIS In the field, an unicorn.
Rev. OVLD FISH STREETE HIS HALFE PENY.

#471 AT YE WILL. SOMERS . BACKSIDE The king's jester.
Rev. OVLD FISH STREETE. 1666 In the field, I. M. W.

OB. for obolus, is in the field, on the obverse of this token.
The figure of Will Somers is here represented in his Tudor state livery, with a horn in his right hand, familiar to those who have seen the rare Delaram print of the royal jester. Taylor the water poet, in his Elegy on Tom, Coryate, prays

" ! were my wit inspired with Scoggin's veine,
Or that Will Sommers ghost had seized my braine."

"Why his portraiture should be here exhibited on a sign -board affords a curious point for conjecture, that may possibly be solved on the supposition it was set up
in a friendly way of conferring notoriety.

* The wood-cut in the title of the Notorious Life and Ignominious Death of John Lambe, otherwise called Doctor Lambe, 1628, 4to, has a view of the Windmill tavern in Lothbury, with its pendant sign.

Robert Hunsing, purveyor of sea-fish to King Henry the Eighth, resided in Old Fish street, where he died, and was buried in 1541, in the adjoining church of St. Nicholas Cole-abbey. Did Hunsing derive any influence at court from the friendly offices and jocoseries of Will Somers, and thus perpetuate a remembrance of benefits so derived ?

Old Fish street was wholly destroyed in the great fire of 1666, nor will it cause the least surprise, when the narrowness of the thoroughfares in the metropolis at this period is borne in mind. Dulaure, Histoire de Paris, tome ix. p. 482, describing that city, before the accession of Louis the Fourteenth, states that " the streets were so narrow, particularly in the heart of the town, that carriages could not penetrate into them." London was almost equally under the same censure. Davenant, writing before the fire, observes " Sure your ancestors contrived your narrow streets in the days of wheel -barrows, before these engines, carts, were invented. Is your climate so hot, that as you walk you need umbrellas of tiles to intercept the sun ? or are your shambles so empty, that you are afraid to take in fresh air, lest it should sharpen your stomachs ? Oh, the goodly landskip of Old Fish street ! which, had it not had the ill luck to be crooked, was narrow enough to have been your founder's perspective ; and where the garrets, perhaps not for want of architecture, but through abundance of amity, are so made that opposite neighbours may shake hands without stirring from home."

This token is curious as presenting us with the effigies of Henry VIII.’s famous jester, Will Somers, whose wit and talent and inoffensive manners made him a great favourite with that monarch and his court. He is here represented, as in the well-known print, wearing a cap and feather, and a long gown, and holding a sort of hunting-horn. Our token is too small for the details of his costume ; but it is no doubt intended to be exactly like that in the engraving, underneath which are the lines :

“ What though thou think’st mee clad in strange attire,
Knowe I am suted to my owne deseire ;
And yet the characters describ’d upon mee,
May shew thee that a King bestow’d them on mee ;
This Horne I have betokens Sommers game,
Which sportive tynie will bid thee reade my name ;
All with my nature well agreeing too,
As both the Name, and Tyme, and Habit doe.”
Akerman.

B2135. Obverse. THE . KINGS . HEAD . TAVERN = A full-faced bust of Henry VII.
R. IN . OLD . FISHE . STREET = W . R . A.    1/4

This token is struck in imitation of engraving.

B2136. Obverse. Wil . Baggot . brewer = Two women washing a negro (The Labour in vain).
R. ON . OVLD . FISH . STREET . HIL = W . B.     1/4

The women scrubbing a negro white implies “ labour in vain,” in which a quibble seems embodied. Women formerly were brewers.

Skelton, in laudatory rhymes, has eternized Elinour Rummen the original of Mother Redcap ; and the ale-wives of England are commemorated in ballads and in churchwardens’ accompts of the olden day everywhere ; yet Bagot by his sign defied competition—to produce ale like his would be “labour in vain.” The sign obtained distinction, and Hatton (New Viezv of London, 1708, Svo., p. 405) notices it as “Old Fish street, or Labour-in-vain hill.”

In Taylor, the water-poet’s Nibble Rabble of Gossips, printed in his collected works, 1630, folio, Barbara tells Frances how there is “good ale at the Labour-in-vain.”

Richard Smith, in his Obituary , notices: “August 18th, 1656, Mr Bagott, brewer, son-in-law to Mr Newbold, died insolvent.”

Subsequently the same chronicle of death records : “ May 29th 1664, died my old friend and quondam fellow, Mr William Newbold, in the Old Jewry, attorney :
buried June 2d.”-—[B]

B2138. Obverse. Will . Gay . at . ye . fox = A fox chained.
R. IN . OVLD . FISH . STREETE = W . M . G.     1/4

B2139. Obverse. GEORGE . HEARON . 1662= A fox.
R. IN . OLD . FISH . STREET = HIS HALF PENY.

B2141. Obverse. THE . SWAN . TAVERN = A Swan.
R. IN . OVLD . FISH . STREET = I . A . M.

B2144. Obverse. AT . THE . CARDINAL . WOOLSEY = W . E . M.
R. backside . ovld . fish . street = Bust of the Cardinal. HIS OB [olus].

B2145. Obverse. at . cardynal . wooLSEY = Bust of Cardinal Wolsey.
R. IN . OVLD . FISH . STRET = I . E . P.     1/4

“ He [Wolsey] had a very stately cellar for his wines, about Fish-Street, called Cardinal Wolsey’s cellar.”—Aubrey’s Lives , iii. 588, quoted in Cunningham’s Hand-Book of London.

B2146. Obverse. at . the . Shipp . tavern = A ship in full sail.
R. IN . OLD . FISHE . STREETE = E . E . S.     1/4

OLD FISH-STREET HILL.

#472 WILL: BAGGOTT BREWER Two women scrubbing a negro.
Rev. IN OVLD FISH STREET HILL In the field, W. B.

The women scrubbing a negro white implies " labour in vain," in which a quibble seems embodied. Women formerly were brewers ; Skelton, in laudatory rhymes, has eternized Elinour Rummen the original of Mother Redcap ; and the ale-wives of England are commemorated in ballads and in churchwardens' accompts of the olden day everywhere ; yet Bagot by his sign defied competition : to produce ale like his would be " labour in vain." The sign obtained distinction, and Hatton (New View of London, 1708, 8vo, p. 405) notices it as " Old Fish street, or Labour-in-vain hill."

In Taylor the water poet's Ribble Rabble of Gossips, printed in his collected works, 1630, folio, Barbara tells Frances, how there is " good ale at the Labour-
in-vain. "

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, notices, " August 18th, 1656, Mr. Bagott, brewer, son-in-law to Mr. Newbold, died insolvent." Subsequently the same chronicle of death records, " May 29th, 1664, died my old friend and quondam fellow, Mr. William Newbold, in the Old Jewry, attorney: buried June 2d."

FISH-STREET HILL.

The acclivity from London Bridge to Gracious street was formerly called Bridge street, latterly New Fish street, or Fish-street hill, and from the steepness highly inconvenient ; after the fire, the road in Thames street was raised considerably, and the hill so reduced, that Pepys, in his Diary, August 22d, 1668, notices with apparent satisfaction, " the hill was then easy and pleasant."

#473 AT THE HARROW INN A harrow, in the field.
Rev. IN NEW .FISH STREETE In the field, I. A. C.

#474 YE SWAN & BRIDGE IN A swan standing on bridge.
Rev. NEW FISH STREETE. [16] 57 In field, G. E. B.

London Bridge, with the houses, are represented on the obverse ; the swan standing on it is intended for a pun the swan above bridge, to distinguish it from the Old Swan in Upper Thames street.

New Fish street, or Fish -street hill, was wholly destroyed in the great fire in 1666 ; but, on being rebuilt, the sign of the Swan was again adopted, and yet remains at the corner of Globe court.

#475 AT THE MITER IN A mitre, in the field.   
Rev. NEWFISH STREET In the field, W. A. H.   1/4  [William Harman - see below]

“ On Sunday night, Sept. 29. a Dun Gelding about 15 hands high, with a black main-and a black list down the Rump, 8 years old was stolen from Mr. Ralph Marifield of the parish of Eltham in the County of Kent. Whoever gives notice of the Gelding to Mr. William Harman at the Miter in new Fish-street . . . .
shall have 40s. for his paines.”

This advertisement, which appeared in the Mercurius Publicus (October 3-10, 1661, p. 632), gives the name of the issuer—William Harman—whose initials only appear on the token. The advertisement also appeared in the Kingdom's Intelligencer , September 30 —October 7, 1661, p. 633.

#476 WILL. NEWMAN AT THE Anchor and cable, in the field.
Rev. ON NEW FISH STREET HILL HIS HALF PENY.

In the scarce print of Fish-street hill and the Monument, in which the signs are distinctly affixed to the houses, the Anchor and Cable is the fourth house from the Monument, towards Eastcheap.

B2007. Obverse. the . Kings . Head . tavern = Head of Henry VIII.
R. IN . NEW . FISH . STREETE = T . M . B. 1/4

B2009. Obverse. THO . Blagrave . kings = Bust of Henry VIII. with sceptre.
R. HEAD . NEW . FISH . STREET = T . I . B. 1/4

B2011. Obverse. ROBERT . CRADOCKE = King’s bust crowned, with sceptre.
R. IN . NEW . FISH . STREET = R ... C. 1/4

B2013. Obverse. the . Black . Spred . Eagle = A double-headed spread eagle.
R. IN . NEW . FISH . STREETE = F . M . M. 1/4

B2015. Obverse. ye . Sun . Taverne . in — The sun.
R. NEW . FISHE . STREET . 57 = T . E . P. 1/4

“ Thence to Westminster Hall (it being Termetime) and there met with Commissioner Pett, and so at noon he and I by appointmnnt to the Sun in New Fish
Street, where Sir J. Minnes, Sir W. Batten, and we all were to dine, and by discourse I found Sir J. Minnes a fine gentleman and a very scholler.”—Pepys’
“Diary,” Novembers, 1661.

Pepys records one or two other visits to this house.

B2016. Obverse. O. AT . YE . GRASHOPER . IN = T . V.
R. new . fish . streete = A grasshopper. 1/4

Fleet Bridge, Fleet lane and Fleet street are here

FLEMISH CHURCHYARD, St. Catharine's.

Behind Hangman's-Gains, corrupted from Hammes and Guisnes, is the Flemish churchyard, appropriated for the burial of those of Hammes and Guisnes, and other poor Flemings who came over afterwards under Queen Elizabeth, and is etill a churchyard for the poorer sort. Stow's Survey, edit. 1754, vol. i. p. 353.


#497 THE LABOR IN VAINE IN Women scrubbing a negro.
Rev. FLEMISH CHURCHYARD In the field, I. I. C.

#498 AT THE GOAT IN In the field, a goat.
Rev. FLEMISH CHURCH YARD T. D. H., in the field.

FORE STREET, Cripplegate.

B1112. Obverse. thomas . white = A tree. 1661.
R. IN . FORE . STREET = T . W. 1/4

#499 THOMAS WHITE The Royal Oak, 1664, in the field.
Rev. IN FORE STREET In the field, T. W.

The Royal Oak, as a sign, derived its impetus from being a principal object in the lord mayor's pageant in the year of the Restoration. Evelyn, in his Diary, October 29th, 1660, mentions, " going to London, my lord maior's show stopped me in Cheapside ; one of the pageants represented a greate wood, with the royal oake, and history of His Majesty's miraculous escape at Boscobel."

B1108. Obverse. AT . THE . TOBACCO . ROVLE = A roll of tobacco.
R. IN . FORE . STREETE = I . B. 1/4

B1109. Obverse. Isaac . Ellsworth . at . ye = A lion rampant.
R. in . Foare . streete = A monogram. 1/4

B1110. Obverse. Thomas . Papworth = A lion rampant.
R. IN . FORE . STREETE = T . E . P. 1/4

B1111. Obverse. CLEMENT . SMITH . AT . THE = A dove.
R. IN . FORE. STREET. l666 = HIS HALFE PENY.

B1113. Obverse. Sarah . Willcockes . in . far . street = Seven stars.
R. MILENER . HER . HALFE . PENNY = S . W. 1668.


FOSTER LANE, Cheapside.

Foster lane previous to the fire in 1666 was chiefly occupied by working goldsmiths. Dugdale, in his Diary, March 12th, 1663, has the following notice : " Paid to a jeweller in Foster lane, for the gold, and making the medall granted to me by the king, to wear as Norroy King of Armes, 51. 12s. Paid for the gold chain 81. 10s., in toto, 14Z. 2s." The engraved portrait of Dugdale, from the picture at Blythe hall, Warwickshire, by Holl, exhibits the Norroy medal pendant from the shoulders.

#500 AT THE DAGAR AND- A dagger, with magpie on point.
Rev. PYE IN FOSTER LANE In the field, M. H. D.

Face, in the first scene of Ben Jonson's Alchemist, played in 1610, describes Dapper to Doll Common, as a lawyer's clerk he had met with on the preceding night, " in Holborn, at the Dagger." Gifford comments <m this, " the Dagger is not mentioned at random : it was an ordinary or gaming-house of the lowest and most disreputable kind." Again, in the second scene of the fifth act, Subtle tells Dapper, as from Doll Common, his supposed " aunt of Fairy,"

" Her Grace would have you eat no more Woolsack pies, Nor Dagger frumety."

The pies obtained at the Woolsack ordinary or tavern have here a distinguished notice by the dramatist, but certainly had not the celebrity of the Dagger-pies, which conferred considerable notoriety on " the Dagger in Cheap," apparently the house designated on the token as in Foster lane, but possibly having a long passage or way leading to it from Cheapside. The device on Dannet's token is a pictorial pun of a dagger-pie, so frequently alluded to by early satirists and writers. Decker, in his Satiro-mastlx, 1602, says

" Out, bench -whistler, out ; I'll not take thy word
For a Dagger-pie."

There are also allusions and notices in Hobson's Jests, 1607 ; in the Penniless Parliament of Thread-bare Poets, 1608 ; and in Rowland's 'Tis merry when gossips meet, 1609.

So too, in Histrio-mastix, a supposed satire on Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, printed in 1610; the Captain having impressed Belch, the players' bill-poster, on his exit, tells him

" Text billes must now be turned to iron billes."
Belch shouts after him,

" And please you let them be Dagger-pies." Sign. F2.

Dagger-pies are also mentioned in Henry Parrot's Laqud Ridiculosi: or Springes for Woodcocks, 1613, 8vo.

Richard Smith, in his Obituary, Sloane MS. 886, records, " December 22d, 1657, Moses Dannet, at y Dagger in Foster lane, buried."

#501 JOHN CHAMBERS AT Ye Woolpack, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE In the field, I. A. C.   1/4

In “ A Vademecum for Malt worms,” part ii., p. 6, we are told by one “ Ben—t,” that : .

“ He went to Woolpack’s Sign in Foster-lane,
Where he awhile drew Drink, and thriv’d apace.
As Tories, Whigs, High-Church and Low confess,
No Beer in Town deserves an ill Word less ;
Or, to the Landlord’s Credit, be it said,
Better delight the Taste, and wears a better Head.”

On page 24 of the same “Vademecum ” are the words “ Foster Lane,” and a representation of a woolpack ; beneath which are the following lines :

“ Now for a House with Sots replete, and full,
Of Chaps that deal with Gold for Drink —not Wool,
For Goldls the Man that keeps it by-the-by,
Once a most merry Snob in Garret high.
There, Swarms of Topers of all sorts frequent,
From Daily Labourers, to Men styled Gent,
Of all opinions and of all conditions,
Lawyers, Fools , Statesmen, Taylors, Politicians,
Grave Philomaths, Shoemakers, and Physicians.”

#502 LANCELOTT AYRES AT YE Rose, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE HIS PENY In field, L. M. A.

#503 RICHARD EAST AT THE Stag's head, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE. 1664 HIS HALFE PENNY.

Dislodged by the great fire in September, 1666. East reestablished himself at the Stag's Head, in Whitecross street, whence he issued a similar token.

#504 SAMUELL DAWSON AT Ye Nag's head, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE . 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

#505 ANTHONY POOLE IRONMONGR Nag's head, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE . 1668 HIS HALFE PENY.

Poole appears to have been successor to Dawson, on the rebuilding after the great fire.

#506 EDWARD JARVIS AT YE Sun in rays, in the field.
Rev. IN FOSTER LANE. 1668 HIS HALF PENY. E. I. I.

Issued on opening the newly erected house, after the fire.

B1115. Obverse. ELLEN Billing . at . ye . dark = Full-faced female bust.
R. ENTRY . ORDINARY . IN . FOSTER = LANE HER HALFE PENNY.

B1117. Obverse. at . the . dagar . and = A dagger with a magpie on the point.
R. pye . in . foster . lane = m . h . d and three cloves; above, a crest. 1/4

B1120. Obverse. James . Ferne = A pair of bellows.
R. IN . FOSTER . LANE = I . S . F. 1/4

B1121. Obverse. Robert . Gearrard . at . ye = A lion rampant.
R. RED . LYON . IN . FOSTER . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . E.

B1122. Obverse. Robert . Gerard = A lion passant-gardant.
R. IN . FOSTER . LANE = R . E . G. 1/4

B1123. Obverse. Mathew . Hoult = Three nuns.
R. IN . FOSTER . LANE . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY.

B1126. Obverse. William . Wade . at . the = A dagger.
R. DAGGER . IN . FOSTER . LANE = W . M . W.

B1127. Obverse. William . Wade . at = A dagger.
R. FOSTER . LANE . 1661 = W . M . W. 1/4

Face, in the first scene of Ben Jonson’s Alchemist , played in 1610, describes
Dapper to Doll Common as a lawyer’s clerk he had met with on the preceding
night, “in Holborn, at the Dagger,” whereon Gifford says, “it was an ordinary,
or gaming-house of the lowest and most disreputable kind.” Again, in the second
scene of the fifth act, Subtle tells Dapper, as from Doll Common, his supposed
“ Aunt of Fairy ” :

“ Her Grace would have you eat no more Woolsack pies,*

Nor Dagger frumety.”

The pies obtained at the Woolsack ordinary or tavern have here a distinguished
notice by the dramatist, but certainly had not the celebrity of the Dagger pies,
which conferred considerable notoriety on “the Dagger in Cheap,” apparently the
house designated on token No. 1117 as in Foster Lane, but possibly having a long
passage or way leading to it from Cheapside. The device on Dannet’s token is a
pictorial pun of a dagger-pie, so frequently alluded to by early satirists and
writers.—[B.]

“ Lost on the 2 d. Instant out of Somerset-House , a plain Gold Watch made
by Martinet Aux Galleries du Louvre a Paris , a square diamond Locket of one
large rose Diamond with several less. . . . Upon notice of these, or any of them
to Mr. William Wade Golsmith, at the Dagger Ordinary in Foster-Lane , . . .
the Discoverer shall have 5 pounds for his peyns.”—The Intelligencer , April 24,
1665, p. 259.


B1128. Obverse. John . Wallis = Arms; a lion rampant.
R. IN . FOSTER . LANE = I . W. 1/4



FOUNTAIN LANE, St. Giles.

#507 THO: BRODWAY OF ST. GILES Hand holding pine -apple.
Rev. AT FOVNTAN . LAN . END In the field, T. A. B.

FREEMAN’S LANE.

B1129. Obverse. John . Stock . 1667 = Three men standing.
R. IN . FREEMANS . LANE = HIS HALFE PENNY.


FRESH WHARF (Billingsgate).

B1130. Obverse. at . the . 3 . marriners = Three sailors.
R. AT . FRESH . WHARFE = T . S . D.


FRIDAY STREET.

#508 AT YE WHIT[E] HORS[E] A horse current, in the field.
Rev. IN FRYDAY STREETE . [16]57 In field, E. M. M.

Fantastique, in Peele's Old Wives' Tale, 1595, says, " I had even as lieve the chamberlaine of the White Horse inn had called me up to bed." Act i. sc. 1. The chamberlain is an officer whose duties are now nearly extinct. Chytrseus, a German, who visited England about 1580, and narrated his observations in Latin verse, noticed, as an extraordinary circumstance, the custom in the English inns of being waited on by women.

The White Horse tavern in Friday street was, from its contiguity to houses of distinction, the Mermaid in Cheap, and others in that locality, of considerable notoriety among bon-vivants, players, playwrights, and roisterers, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. In the Jests of George Peele it is mentioned as the scene of some of his mad pranks and irregularities ; and in the poetical productions of that period. The tavern was destroyed in the great fire of September, 1666, and on being rebuilt was constituted an inn with spacious yard, resuming the old sign. It is still there.

#509 ANDREW VINCENT Ye COFFEE Hand holding coffee-pot.
Rev. HOVSE IN FRIDAY STREET . [16] 71 In field,  1D  1/4

A coffee-house penny of the large brass size.

B1131. Obverse. Phillip . iordan . at . ye . blak = A negro boy holding an arrow.
R. BOY . IN . FRYDAY . STREET . 1 669 = HIS HALFE PENY. P . E . I.

B1132. Obverse. AT . Y . WHIT . HORS . TAVRAN = H . E . I.
R. in . fryday . streete = A horse running.

B1135. Obverse. Sam . Watson = A hand pouring coffee into a cup.
R. IN. FRYDAY. STREETE = HIS HALF PENY.



FULLER'S RENTS

Fuller's is a perversion of Fulwood's rents, buildings erected by Christopher Fulwood, a member of Gray's Inn, in the reign of King James the First. The facetious Ned Ward, late in life, had here a punch-house, within one door of Gray's Inn ; at this house he died in 1731.

#510 GEORGE RYTHE AT THE Angel and crown, in the field.
Rev. IN FULLERS RENTS . HOLBORN HIS HALF PENNY.

B1136. Obverse. William . Bathe . at . ye . Oxford - Arms of the City of Oxford in a shield ; W . K. B .
R. ARMES . IN . FULLERS . RENTS . 65 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B1137. Obverse. Edward . Buttlor . in . fullwoods . Rents . his
R. The Royal Oak with three crowns, and in . holborn.



###

As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

And Last updated on: Monday, 06-Jul-2020 16:19:21 BST