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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Strand

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

The # prefix is the numbering of the Beaufoy collection, and B is the prefix of additional tokens listed in the Boynes collection.


STRAND.

(See also New Exchange , The Savoy , Strand Bridge , and Temple Bar Without .)

The Strand, now among the most busy of highways, continued to be a strand, on the banks of the Thames, long after all other parts of extending London and Westminster had lost their original appearance and character. The footway from Temple bar, so called from the magnificent adjoining house of the Templars thence to the Palace of Westminster, was, in 1315, so ill maintained, that the feet of horses, as well of rich as of poor men, were often greatly injured, particularly in the rainy season, the footway being frequently interrupted by bushes and thickets. The sites of two of the bridges in the line of roadway of the Strand, passing over streams which had their course to the Thames, are yet denoted by the names given to the lanes through which the channels found their way : Strand bridge, or Strand lane, opposite the end of Newcastle street, and Ivy bridge, the lane leading to the Fox-under-the-hill, between Salisbury street and the Adelphi.

The Palsgrave's Head tavern is listed under Temple Bar

#1090* JACOB ROBINS AT PRINCE Half figure, with truncheon in right hand.
Rev. RUPERT'S HEAD IN YE STRAND HIS HALFE PENNY. I. E. R.

#1093 YE COFFEE HOUSE AGAINST In field, W. E. S.
Rev. S. CLEMENTS CHURCH . STRAND HIS HALFE PENY.

The Strand in its course lay on the south side of the church ; the north side had the appellation of" the backside of St. Clement's," or " back of St. Clement's;" but under the improvements introduced by Alderman Pickett has obtained the name of Pickett street, a deserved compliment paid to his public services. The portion so named commences at Ship yard, passes St. Clement's churchyard, and terminates at the end of Wyche street.

#1094 GEO: LAURANCE. MEAL A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev. AGA T CLEMENTS CHV In the field, G. M. L.  1/4

The Christian name, GEO. ends, not commences, the legend,

#1096 MATTHIAS BOWMAN In the field, an escalop shell.
Rev. IN THE STRAND. 1667 HIS HALFE PENY, in field.

The escalop-shell was the badge of a pilgrim', and became so general that Pope Alexander the Fourth, between the years 1254 and 1261, prohibited all pilgrims, but those who were truly noble, from assuming the escalop-shell in their armorial insignia.

The Apostle St. James the Great, generally pourtrayed in the garb of a pilgrim, has the escalop-shell as his symbol ; and being the patron saint of the abbey at Reading in Berkshire, that monastic institution bore azure, three escalops or. The abbot had the privilege, about the year 1300, to coin money ; and on the pennies struck in this mint is an escalop-shell, in the first quarter on the reverse.

#1097 ROB. CHAMBERS NEAR YE The may-pole, in the field.
Rev. MAY-POLE IN THE STRAND In field, R. I. C. 1.

On the obverse, in the field, is a sugar-loaf and three cloves : Chambers was therefore a grocer.

#1098 NAT. CHILD NEAR YE MAY POAL Boar's head, in field.
Rev. IN YE STRAND . GROCER . HIS  1/2 - Chequers.

The boar's head on the obverse is pierced with three arrows. From the chequers being on the reverse he was possibly licensed to sell wines.

#1099 PHILLIP COMPLIN AT THE MAY POLE. 1666, in field.
Rev. IN THE STRAND . DISTILLER HIS HALFE PENY.

The May-pole, with some small building attached, is delineated on the obverse of this piece.

#1100 JOHN DOLLEN POVLTERER BY A bell pierced by maypole.
Rev. YE MAY POLE IN THE STRAND HIS HALF PENY. I. D. D.

Gerrard's letter, dated April 1st, 1634, printed among the Strafford Papers, vol. i. p. 227, supplies the fact of the first establishment of hackney-coach stands in the metropolis. A captain Bailey had just then commenced the practice, by placing four hackney coaches, the drivers in livery, at the May-pole in the Strand, to convey passengers to required parts of the town at certain fixed fares. Prior to this time no coaches stood in the streets for hire, but were to be hired from the stables in inn -yards; and, according to Rush worth (Collections, edit. 1680, vol. i. part ii., p. 317), there were then not more than twenty, in or about London.

The Tatler, March 9th, 1710, announced a stage-coach " twice aweek from the One Bell in the Strand to Dorchester, the proper time for writing pastorals now drawing near." The One Bell yard, on the north side of St. Mary's church, was formerly famous for its stabling, and the hire of carriages or " glass coaches" for private use. The tavern and buildings in the yard are now let out in tenements.

#1100*JOHN DUTTON. HIS HALF PENY King's head; Henry the Eighth.
Rev. NEAR YE Maypole, in the field ; IN THE STRAND.

#1101 THE LOBSTER AT THE A lobster, in the field.
Rev. MAY POLE IN THE STRAND In the field, E. G.

#1101*JOHN TWISTLETON AT Ye A building? I. T., above.
Rev. IN THE STRAND. HIS HALFE PENNY.

The building is apparently the dwarf erection formerly at the foot of the May -pole.

#1102 FRANC. GROVE AT WHIT A swan, in the field.
Rev. AGAINST SOMERSET HOUSE In the field, F. E. G.

Now the Morning Chronicle newspaper office. The sign -post of the White Swan, and its moveable or swinging sign-board, with a decorated iron frame, is pictorially shown in June's ludicrous but scarce print of The Lady's Disaster, 1746.

Subsequently, the White Swan was a public house on the west side of Swan yard; but that house and three others were destroyed by fire, May 4th, 1812.

#1102* IN THE STRANDE R. M. L., in the field.
Rev. NEARE  SOMERSET H. In the field, R. M. L.

Somerset house, built by Edward Seymour, duke of Somerset, Lord Protector, beheaded in 1552, and memorable for many historical events within its walls, was demolished in 1775 for the erection of the present edifice.

#1103 JOHN BROMLEY IN YE STRAND A barber's soap-box.
Rev. NEAR THE BRIDGE . 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

See also No. 1118. Lord' Thurlow, in his speech, on July 17th, 1797, for postponing the further reading of the Surgeon's Incorporation bill, stated that, " by a statute still in force, barbers and surgeons were each to use a pole, as a sign."

#1104 AT THE CANARY HOUSE CANARY, in monogram.
Rev. IN THE STRAND. 1665 I? amid vine leaves.

Ben Jonson, in his Every Man out of Us Humour, eulogises the liquor "Canary, the very essence and spirit of wine."

In "A note of some disbursements for my brother, J. Thornton, of Brockhall, 1637," in the writer's possession, occurs, " Item, for a dosen of stone bottles of sacke, 14s. 6d." A bottle of sack, inscribed " New Canary, put in to see long keep good, April 1659, Hi. Combe/' was found by some labourers in August, 1735, while draining a fish-pond at Hempstead, Hertfordshire, embedded in mud, at least three feet deep. The mouth of the bottle was waxed over, and the wine perfectly good when tasted ; but decay had nearly destroyed the cork.

The Canary House in the Strand was long distinguished as a place of public resort by persons of high character. Here, in March, 1655, Sir Theodore Mayerne, who had been physician of the household to King Henry the Fourth of France, and subsequently in the same capacity to King Charles the First, and was also the friend of Rubens and Vandyck, assisting them in the chemical composition of colours, became ill from the effect of drinking some bad wine, that, to a person of his advanced age, being then in his eighty-third year, operated as a deadly poison. He foretold, to the friends with whom he was drinking, the time of his death, and it happened according to his prediction. He was buried on the 29th, in the old church of St. Martin's in the fields ; and, in the vaults of the present church, the writer some years since, while on a fruitless search for some memorial of Nell Gwynne, saw, among other fine monuments unknown to archseologists a superb memento to this distinguished worthy.

The Canary House was possibly Carey house, noticed as " near the Savoy in the Strand." Pepys, in his Diary, November 30th, 1667, mentions his proceeding from Arundel house " to Gary house, a house now f entertainment, next my lady Ashley's, where I have heretofore heard common prayer in the time of Dr. Mossum." Loveby, in Dryden's Wild Gallant, 1669, observes " I think upon the sack at Gary house with the abricot flavour."

In an advertisement for the sale of some paintings in 1689, "at three o'clock in the afternooon," the Canary house in the Strand is described as being "between the Feathers tavern and Long's coffee-house, on the east side of Exeter 'Change."

#1105 GEORGE LANGFORD AT View of Exeter house.
Rev. EXCETER IN THE STRAND G. S. L., in the field.

The sign here appears to have been Exeter house, lastly known as Exeter 'Change, and memorable in our day for the exhibitions of animals and birds from all parts of the globe, continued to the time of its demolition.

In the olden time the parsonage -house of St. Martin's in the fields stood on part of the site, till devolving to the crown, Queen Elizabeth granted it to Sir William Cecil, then lord treasurer, who built on it Cecil house, and, when ennobled as Baron Burleigh, it was then called Burleigh house. That distinguished statesman, one of the luminaries of that period, died here in 1598. His son, Thomas Cecil, created Earl of Exeter in 1605, resided here, and it then received the appellation of Exeter house. During the Interregnum the house seems to have been occupied by the Parliamentary authorities; the funeral cortege of General Popham, who was buried in Westminster abbey on the evening of Wednesday, September 24th, 1651, was attended from Exeter house by the Speaker, the Lord General, and many members of the parliament and council. The doctors of civil law, in the fire of 1666, being driven westward, occupied Exeter house till 1672. Langford's token is no doubt prior to this last occupation; but on the demolition of the building in August, 1829, the writer saw, cut in the stone architrave above the window at the east end, " EXETER 'CHANGE, 1676," a date much earlier in its adaptation than is generally supposed. The length of the building was, from east to west, forty paces.

#1106 WILLIAM LYNE AT Ye Three cranes erect, in field.
Rev. CRANES BY YE SAVOY . STRAN In field, W. E. L.

In Willsford's Nature's Secrets, it is said " Cranes soaring aloft and quietly in the air foreshows fair weather ; but if they make much noise, as consulting which way to go, it foreshows a storm near at hand." The cranes seem here to be maintaining a regular cabal.

#1107 THE ROSE AND CROWN Tudor rose, crowned, in field.
Rev. AGAINST THE SAVOY In the field, H. M. T.

#1108 AT THE UINCORNE An unicorn, in the field.
Rev. AGANST THE SAVOY A double-stemmed rose; R. M. D.

#1108* AT THE ANCHOR In the field, an anchor.
Rev. IN THE STRAND E. E. T., in the field.  1/4

#1111 AT YE CROS KEYES IN YE Two keys crossed, infield.
Rev. STRAND . COOKE . 1657 In the field, I. M. C.

The crossed keys are the symbol of St. Peter, the tutelary saint of Westminster. The still unfathomed doubt whether St. Peter was ever at Rome has long employed the research of distinguished theologians ; but the fact of his sojourn in England stands incontestably established in monkish annals. St. Peter having determined to consecrate the newly erected abbey of Westminster, the night being stormy, he was delayed on the opposite bank of the river, till a fisherman in his boat afforded him a safe passage across. To perpetuate this event, the custom, originating in the person of Edric the fisherman, in 618, was established, that one of his descendants, a fisherman, had the right, one day in the year, to be seated at table with the prior of Westminster, and to demand ale and bread of the cellarer.
The practice was discontinued in 1382.

* Rowsee's Treatise on the Queene's Welles.
t The cellars of the Royal Exchange, on Cornhill.

#1112 THO. DAY. TALLOW CHANDLER A plant of six leaves.
Rev. IN YE STRAND. HIS HALF PENY Man dipping candles, in the field.

#1113 AT THE GOLDE LYON A lion rampant, in the field.
Rev. TAVERN IN THE STRAND In the field, E. M. I.

B2986. Obverse. at . the . golde . lyon = A lion rampant.
R. TAVERN . IN . THE . STRAND = F . M . I. 1/4

The initials are evidently those of Francis Jeffery, who also issued a halfpenny token.
King James the First, in the fourth of his reign, leased for ninety-nine years, at the annual rent of ten shillings, certain tenements in the parish of St. Mary-le-Savoy, part and parcel of the possessions pertaining to Denmark house, to John Villiers, viscount Purbeck, brother to " Steeny," George Villiers, duke of Buckingham. These tenements, by a parliamentary ordinance in 1650, were sold for the benefit of the state, and among them is enumerated " the Golden Lyon."

#1114 YE GOLDEN LYON AND Lion rampant ; the sun above.
Rev. SVN IN YE STRAND [16]57 In  field, R. M. B.

" The Golden Lion," and " the Sun," are enumerated as distinct tenements in the Parliamentary Survey, 1650 ; the annual rent of each being 26s. Sd. Either both tenements were thrown into one after the sale in that year, or the Golden Lion assumed the addition of " the god of day," as a greater attraction.

#1115 AT THE HARPE A harp, in the field.
Rev. IN THE STRAND . 1656 In the field, B. A. P.  1/4

Struck in fac-simile of the farthing tokens of the largest size, issued under the authority of the patents of James the First and Charles the First. The only piece in the whole series having resemblance to the royal tokens.

#1116 THOMAS HUNT . BAKER A batch of rolls, in the field.
Rev. IN THE STRAND . 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

The lozenge-shaped object on the obverse is a batch of cake-bread, rolls, or manchets. So in Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Faire, 1614, where the allusion is to a tailor, a calling traditionally said to be famous for eating hot rolls :

"Aye, and eat them all too, an they were in cake-bread." Act v. sc. 3.

Taylor the water poet, in his Jacke o' Lent, 1617, says " the bakers metamorphose their trade from one shape to another ; his round halfe-penny loaves are transform'd into square wigges, which wigges like drunkards are drown'd in their  ale. The rowles are turn'd into simnels, in the shape of bread-pies ; and the light puff'd up foure-corner'd bun doth shew that the knavery of the baker is universal,  in Asia, Europe, Afrike, and America ; for since colliers and scriveners have purchased the possession of the pillory from them, their light bread brings in heavy gaines ; where if by chance, a batch or a basketfull being examined by the scales of justice, and the bread committed to Newgate for want of weight, and the baker to the Counter for lacke of conscience, yet hee knowes he shall out againe, and with a tricke that he hath, in one weeke he will recover the consumption of his purse againe, by his moderate light handling of the medicine of meale, yeast, and water."

#1117 JOHN FERRIS AT THE HARE In field, a hare running.
Rev. IN THE STRAND. 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

" Hare's flesh is good for those that would be leane and faire. It is a received opinion that use of hare's fleshe procureth beautie, fresh colour, and cheerfull countenance, for a sevenight space ; in so much as the Italians have a by-word, which speaketh thus of a faire man : ' He hath eaten an hare.' " Henry Buttes's Dyets Dry Dinner, 1599, sign. K 2.

#1118 JOHN BROMLEY IN YE STRAND A barber's soap-box.
Rev. NEARE YORKE HOVSE . 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

The site of York house is sufficiently marked out by the streets thus distinguished; GEORGE street, VTLLIERS street, DVKE street, OF alley, BVCKINGHAM street. At the foot of the latter, and next the Thames, is the eminently beautiful landing or water-gate designed by Inigo Jones : a solitary memento of the once memorable edifice to which it was but an accessorial appendage of trivial note.

Bromley, in the same year, lived near Strand bridge. See No. 1103.

#1118* WILL: HORSLEY CHEESMONGER In the field, a woman churning.
Rev. NEARE YORK HOVSE IN Y E STRAND HIS HALF PENY. 1667.

#1119 EDWARD ROBERTS GROCER In the field, HIS HALFE PENNY.
Rev. NEAR YORK HOVSE IN Ye STRAN = Drapers 1 arms, in the field.

“ These are to certify that Mr. Roberts Grocer near York-Gate, is appointed in the roo?n of Mrs. Warwick at the end of the Pell-Mell . ... to receive all Letters paid and ttnpaid, and to carry them to the Office for dispatch —The London Gazette , No. 174, July 15-18, 1667.

#1120 GEORGE SMITH IN YE STRAND HIS HALFE PENNY.
Rev. AGAINST YORK HOVSE . AT Y E Crown, in field.

#1121 Thomas Salisbury . his halfe peny in script characters.
Rev. IN YE STRAND NERE CHARING CROSS Three hawks, perched.

#1122 IN THE STRAND A chopping-knife ? in the field.
Rev. IN WESTMINSTER In the field, s. S. M.

#1123 CHARLES STURTON AT In the field, C. S.
Rev. THE SWAN IN THE STRAND A swan, in the field.  1/4

“ Stolen out of a ground in Kensington on Sunday night, April 28, a pair of bright bay Mares .... with starrs in their foreheads : whoever brings tydings of them, or either of them, .... to the Master of the Szvanne Inne in the Strand, shall have three pounds for his pains .”—Mercurius Pub liens , No. 17, April 25—May 2, 1661, p. 265.

#1124 RICHARD SUMPTER In the field, a greyhound in speed.
Rev. IN THE STRAND. 1664 R. L. S. in the field.

B3012. Obverse. Richard . Sumpter = A greyhound running.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . 1664 = R . E . S. 1/4

B2987 Obverse. AT . Ye . Gray hound = A greyhound.
R. TAVERNE . IN . Ye . STRAND = R . M . I.   1/4

“ By the 21st. section of the Act for rebuilding the city, [after the Great Fire,]  the Corporation had the power to widen certain of the streets, and by Act of the Common Council, 29 April [1667] Fleet Street was accordingly ordered to be  enlarged ‘from the place where the Greyhound Tavern stood to Ludgate ’ to 45 feet instead of 32 and 23 as heretofore.”—Noble's “Memorials of Temple Bar,”

#1125 Robert Ward. 1664, in three lines, occupies the field.
Rev. GLAS SELLER IN Ye STRAND A pendant bottle.

The pendant bottle is the charge in the arms of the company of Bottle-makers and Homers of London ; the leather bottle, that induced an exulting lyrist of the olden day to

" Wish that in heaven his soul may dwell,
That first devised the leather bottel."

In the roll of accompts of the personal expenditure of John king of France,
while prisoner in England, for the year July 1st, 1359, ending July 8th, 1360,
occurs the item, " Pour deux boteilles de cuir, achetees a Londres, pour Mon-
seigneur Philippe, 9s. 8d."

The early interlude of The Four Elements, printed by Rastell, in or about 1510, has a line,

" So merely pypys the mery botell."
This was doubtless no other than the leather bottle, that has so frequently as a sign figured as a will o' the wisp to many a jolly carouser; but these have vanished. " The old leather bottle" in a solitary instance is to be found in Leather lane, at the corner of Charles street ; and, although it once gave character and distinction to Messrs Hoare's banking-house, opposite St. Dunstan's church in Fleet street, the leather bottle is placed over the entrance, visible to every passer-by, but, like that in Leather lane, it is profaned by gilding : it is the golden, and not " the leathern bottle."

#1126 JOHN WILLIAMS AT YE CROWN A crown, in the field.
Rev. VINTNER IN YE STRAND HIS HALF PENY. I. E. W.

B2952. Obverse. Sam . Allatt . ironmonger = The Queen’s head.
R. IN . Y E . STRAND . AGAINST . IVEY . BRIDG = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2953. Obverse. Rich . Ashwin . near . svmer = Three sugar-loaves and R . E . A.
R. set . hovse . in . the . strand = A maypole and J.

B2957. Obverse. Isaac . Browne . in . ye . strand = A rose and crown.
R. NEERE . CHARING . CROSS = I . E . B. 1/4

B2958. Obverse. at . y e . Kings . Head = A bust of Henry VIII. with sceptre.
R. TAVERN . IN . YE . STRAND = A . C. 1/4

B2959. Obverse. AT . THE . ANGELL = An angel holding a scroll.
R. IN . THE . STRAND = I . E . C. 1/4

B2961. Obverse. Robt . Chamberlaine . at . y e = A maypole, a sugar-loaf, and three cloves.
R. MAYPOLE . IN . THE . STRAND = R . I . C.

“ After dinner out with Baity, setting him down at the Maypole in the Strand.”
—Pepys’ “ Diary,” December 20, 1666.

B2963. Obverse. Phillip . Complin = at the. 1666. A maypole and a building.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . DISTILLER = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2964. Obverse. William . Constable = The Prince of Wales’s feathers.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY.

B2965. Obverse. GEORGE . CRAFTES . AT . THE . SVN = The SUn.
R. IN . YE . STRAND . HIS . HALF . PENY = G . A . C. 1666.

The position of this house is fixed by the Mercurius Publicus , March 29—April 5, 1660, p. 1215 :

“ Thomas Oldfield .... dwells next door to the sign of the Sun in the Strand betwixt the Savoy and Worcester-housed*

B2966. Obverse. elles . crispe . at . y e . black = A naked boy with bow and arrow.
R. BOY. IN . THE . STRAND . 1 669 — HIS HALFE PENNY. ^

B2967. Obverse. at . the . axe . in = An axe.
R. THE . STRAND . 1653 = 1 . D. 1/4

B2968. Obverse. at . ye . halfe . moone = A half-moon and bunch of grapes.
R. TAVERN . IN . YE . STRAND = I . K 1/4

“ Lost or left somewhere, and forgotten a Whartons Almanack of 1663, with a
Red Cover claspt, and Papers in it mentioning Payments of Money to one Johnson,
Blackman , and others. Whoever shall give notice thereof to Mr. Hinderson at
the Half-moon Tavern in the Strand .... shall have 20s. for his peyns.”—The
Newes t No. 56, July 14, 1664, p. 453.

B2971. Obverse. JOHN . DUTTON HIS HALF PENY = HEAD OF Henry VIII.
R. neare . y e . in . y e . strand = A maypole.

B2972. Obverse. WILLIAM . ELKINGTON . AT . Y E = A bell.
R. TAVERN . IN . THE . STRAND = W . S . E. 1/4

“ Bell Tavern, Bell Yard, originally belonged to the Priors of St. John. It
is mentioned in the parish register in 1572. In 1672, Daniel Bland, at the ‘ Bell,’
lost his servant, horse, and ^100 in money, for whose recovery he advertised.”—
Mr. Noble’s “ Memorials of Temple Bar,” p. 109.

B2973. Obverse. ROBERT . FAWCETT . IN . Y E . STRAND = HIS HALFE PENNY.
R. A . MEALE . MAN . l666 = R . E . F.

B2974. Obverse. NICHOLAS . FITZ . IEOFFERY = A Sunflower.
R. IN . Y E . STRAND . MILLINER = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2975. Obverse. THE . LOBSTER . AT . THE = A lobster.
R. MAIPOLE . IN . THE . STRAND = E . G. 1/4

B2976. Obverse. Rich . George . at . brewers = St. George and the Dragon.
R . yard . end . in . y e . strand . 1664 = A cock and a flagon. 1/4

B2977. Obverse. Charles . gibbon = A dragon.
R. IN . STRAND = C . G. 1/4

B2978. Obverse. anthony . goldston . at . y e = A female bust.
R . strand . confectioner = a . g and four cloves. 1/4

B2979. Obverse. , FRANC . GROVE . AT . WHIT = Aswan.
R . AGAINST . SOMERSET . HOVSE=F . E . G. 1/4

Afterwards the Morning Chronicle newspaper office. The sign-post of the White
Swan, and its movable or swinging sideboard, with a decorated iron frame, is
pictorially shown in June’s ludicrous, but scarce, print of “ The Lady’s Disaster,” 1746.
Subsequently, the White Swan was a public-house on the west side of Swan
Yard ; but that house, and three others, were destroyed by fire May 4, 1812.— [B.]

B2980. Obverse. the . white . harte = A hart lodged.
R. brewho.strand = C . H (conjoined). 1/4

B2981. Obverse. THE. FOVNTAINE . TAVERNE = A fountain.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . 1657 = E . H. 1/4

“In 1763 Johnson is described as reading ‘Irene’ to Peter Garrick, at the
Fountain Tavern, No. 103 Strand, but no longer in existence. Strype describes
it as ‘a very fine tavern, very conveniently built,’ and as fronting on the Strand
‘ close to the alley leading to Fountain Court.’ Simpson’s was erected on its site.”
— “ Literary Landmarks of London,” p. 170.

“He [Steele] frequented .... the Fountaine, No. 103 Strand, marked by
Fountain Court, until the summer of 1884, when its name was changed to Savoy
Buildings.”— lb., p. 290.

B2982. Obverse. RICH . HARABEN = STRAND (in TWO lines).
R. GROSER . AT , EAGLES . COVRT = 1661. 1/4

B2983. Obverse. ST . HARRISE . IRONMONGER = AT . THE. A lobster.
R. aganst . y e . his . ^ = A maypole and a building.

B2984. Obverse. will . horsley . cheesmonger = A woman churning.
R. NEARE . YORK . HOVSE . IN . Y E . STRAND = HIS HALF PENY. 1667.

B2985. Obverse. thomas . hvnt . baker = Nine rolls of bread.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . l666 = HIS HALF PENY.

B2988. Obverse. Jeremiah . Ives . at . the = The Kings’ Arms.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . 1666 = CHEESMONGER. HIS HALF PENNY.

B2989. Obverse. FRAN . IEFFERY . HIS . J . PENY = F . A . I.
R. the . golden . by . york . hovs = A lion rampant.

Jeffery also issued a farthing token ; but at that time he had another wife, the initial being M., not A.

B2990. Obverse. IN . THE . STRAND = I . A . L.
R. NERE . CHERING . CROS = I . A . L. 1/4

B2991. Obverse. AT . Y E . ONE . BELL . IN = A bell.
R. THE. STRAND. l657 = R. L. 1/4

B2993. Obverse. Tho . Langton . at . ye = A mitre.
R. MITER . IN . YE . STRAND = T . D . L. 1/4

“All People in His Majesties Dominions maybe pleased to take notice, that Major Alexander Merchant de St. Michel Esquire hath obtained the Kings Letters Pattents, for the preventing or curing the Smoak in any Chimney, by a new, easie, and infallible way, at final and inconsiderable charges with few Bricks, as it hath been fully tryed at the Miter Tavern in the Strand over against the May Pole .... The instructions for the budding or mending such Chimneys shall be shewed at eight in the morning every Munday to any Bricklayer or other ingenious person desirous to use it at the Miter Tavern aforesaid .... The Licenses . . . .
shall be given at the rate of five shillings for every Chimney or Firehearth.”—The Kingdom's Intelligencer, No. 32, August 3-10, 1663, p. 509.

B2995. Obverse. Richard . Lyone . in . ye . Strand (in three lines across the field).
R. his . half . peny = A lion rampant, pouring from a coffee-pot into a cup.

B2996. Obverse. in . the . strand = A chopping-knife.
r. IN . WESTMINSTER = S . S . M. 1/4

B2997. Obverse. James . Morey . at . ye = A stag lodged. 1656.
R. whit, hart . strand = The same. 1/4

B2998. Obverse. at . the . Salutation = Two men saluting.
R. TAVERNE . IN . THE . STRAND = L. E . P. 1/4

B2999. Obverse. John . Perris . at . the . hare = A hare running.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . l666 = HIS HALF PENY.

B3000. Obverse. WILLIAM . PHLIS . IN = Arms
R. THE . STRAND . BAKER = W . E . P .

B3001. Obverse. EDWARD . PRICE . AT . YE . MITER = A mitre and a rose.
R. ROSE . TAVERNE . IN . YE . STRAND = HIS HALF PENNY

B3004. Obverse. Jacob . Robin . at . prince = Half-length of Prince Rupert.
R. RUPERTS . HEAD . IN . YE . STRAND = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . E . R.

B3005. Obverse. THO . ROGERS . MEALE = 1658.
R. MAN . IN . Y E . STRAND = T . R. 1/4

B3006. Obverse. Calixt . Rust . in = A rhinoceros; the Apothecaries’ crest.
R. the . strand . 1665= A pot of lilies. 1/4

B3007. Obverse. at . ye . 3 . suger . loaves = Three sugar-loaves.
R. IN . Ye . STRAND . 1657 = G . M . S. 1/4

B3008. Obverse. Thomas . Salisbury . his . halfe . Peny (in four lines).
R. IN . YE . STRAND . NERE . CHARING . CROS = Three falcons on a perch.

B3010. Obverse. George . Smith . grocr = A sugar-loaf.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . 1658 = G . A . S. 1/4

B3014. Obverse. JOHN . TWISLETON . AT . Y E = A building. I . T.
R. IN . THE . STRAND . HIS = HALFE PENNY.

B3017. Obverse. Le . Willson . at . the . 1666 = Bust of Henry VIII.
R. TAVERN . IN . THE . STRAND = HIS HALF PENY.


STRAND BRIDGE.

#1094*LAURENCE GIFFORD Patten-makers' arms, in the field.
Rev. NEARE STRAND BRIGE In the field, L. E. G.

#1095 JOHN STATIONER . YE GOLDEN HIS HALFE PENY. I. G. S. [16] 69.
Rev. BALL NEARE STRAND BRIDGE In the field, a pendant ball.

Strand bridge, now Strand lane. The ball a silk -mercer's sign.


B3019. Obverse. O. AT . Y E . GREENE . MAN = I . I . B.
R. neere . strand . bridge = A wild man with a club. 1/4

B3021. Obverse. Will . Brunsley . at . lillys = A clock-face and hands.
R. HOUS . AGAINST . STRAND . BRIDG = HIS HALF PENY.

B3023. Obverse. AT . THE . BLACK . BULL = A bull.
R. AT . STRAND . BRIDG = I . H. 1/4

B3024. Obverse. WILLIAM . JEFFERSON = HIS HALF PENY.
R. at . strand . bridge = A hand-barrow.

B3025. Obverse. at . the . 2 . Suger . lofes = Two sugar-loaves.
R. AT . THE . STRAN . BRIDGE = C . S. 1/4

B3027. Obverse. THOMAS . WILLIAMS . COAL . SELR = A goat. br> R. OVER . AGAINST . STRAND . BRIDG = HIS HALFE PENNY.


###

As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and oogle books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

And Last updated on: Sunday, 12-Jul-2020 17:38:19 BST