Battle Bridge 1810
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Early Inns and Taverns through tradesmens tokens - Maid lane to Moorgate

This is a historical site about early London coffee Houses and Taverns and will also link to my current pub history site and also The London street directory

LONDON TRADERS, TAVERN, AND COFFEE-HOUSE TOKENS, CURRENT 1649-1672. :

Index of Tradesmens tokens.

MAID LANE, Southwark.

Maid lane appears to have derived its name from Jacob Meade, a waterman and landowner, who, shortly after the destruction of the Globe (Shakespeare's theatre) on the Bankside, June 29th, 1613, entered into articles of partnership with Philip Henslowe, for the converting of the Paris Garden bear-baiting house into a theatre, for scenic representations. When Henslowe's interest in Paris Garden ceased has not been ascertained ; but Jacob Meade, described as of St. Saviour's parish, waterman, was sent for by warrant from the lords of the privy council, for some matter connected with that theatre, and on August 26th, 1620, gave sureties, himself for 100Z., and two others, to appear before the lords at half a day's warning.

#776 MICHAELL STEEL AT THE Wine-pipe and crane?
Rev. IN MAID LANE . SOUTHWARK HIS HALF PENY.

The device on the obverse indicates a pipe of wine, and apparently the wheel of a crane with rope attached. Query, a tun with the worm of a still ?

#777 ELIZABETH JOYNE AT Ye = An anchor, in the field.
Rev. IN MAIDE LANE . 1667 HER HALF PENY.

MAIDEN LANE, Wood Street.

Maiden lane was, in 1845, named Gresham street west.

#778 AT THE COCK In field, a cock.
Rev, IN MEADEN LANE T. E. K., in the field.  1/4

#779 GEORGE BARTMAKER AT CAMD EN A tiled house.
Rev. HOUSE IN MAIDEN LANE . 1668 HIS HALFE PENY. G. E. B.

B1860. Obverse. Allcock = A pegasus within a wreath.
R. mealeman . in . Mayden . lane = The Grocers’ Arms.

B1861. Obverse. John . Allcock . meale = A sheaf of corn.
R. MAN . IN . MAYDEN . LANE = I . E . A. 1/4

B1863. Obverse. JOHN . DUCKWORTH = A legging.
R. IN . MAIDEN . LANE = I . M . D. 1/4

B1865. Obverse. Robert . Packwood = A heart.
R. IN . MAYDEN . LANE = HIS HALF PENY.


ST. MARGARET'S HILL, Southwark.

#780 THE BLACK BOY AT MARG. Virginian boy smoking.
Rev. HILL IN SOUTHWARKE In the field, H. P. H.

MARK LANE, Fenchurch Street.

Stow, in reference to this public way, in 1598, describes it as " Mart lane, so called of a privilege sometime enjoyed to keep a mart there, but long since discontinued, and therefore forgotten, so as nothing remaineth for memory but the name of Mart lane, and that corruptly termed Marke lane."
Mark lane is described in old records, as " the narrowe way called Marte-lane," in the parish of St. Dunstan the bishop, towards the Tower of London.

" The narrow way called Marte lane, and a tenement called Cokedenhall, standing at the corner on the east," and a tenement near " the narrow way called Mengehouslane, " are noticed in a survey of lands and quit-rents belonging to London Bridge in the fifteenth century. Harl. MS. 6016.

#781 W. PAYNE . TAL . CHANDLER A man dipping candles.
Rev. IN MARKE LANE . 1651 In field, W. M. P.  1/4

B1873. Obverse. William . Payne = A chandler.
R. IN . MARKE . LANE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W.A.P.

#782 ALEXANDER STRINGER Clothworkers Company arms.
Rev. IN MARKE LANE . 1666 In field, A. M. S.  1/4

Mary Stringer issued a token from a coffee-house in Little Trinity lane, in 1669. Query, was she his widow ?

#783 WILLIAM PARKER . 1669 In field, three tuns.
Rev. OYLEMAN IN MARK LANE HIS HALF PENY. W. K. P.

#784 AT THE FOX AND GOOSE Fox bearing off a goose.
Rev. AT MARKE LANE END T. P. B., in the field. 1/4

B1866. Obverse. Joseph . Adams . at . ye = A blazing star.
R. IN . MARKE . LANE = I . E . A. 1/4

B1868. Obverse. William . Chapman . at = A star; between the rays 1669.
R. YE . STAR . IN . MARKE. LANE = HIS HALF PENY. W . C.

B1869. Obverse. William . Chapman = A star ; 1669 between the rays.
R. IN . MARKE . LANE = W . C. 1/4

B1870. Obverse. Margry . Mos . in = A horse.
R. MARKE . LANE . l653 = M . M. 1/4

B1871. Obverse. William . Parkar . 1669 = Three tuns.
R. OYLE . MAN . IN . MARK . LANE = HIS HALF PENY. W . K . P.

B1875. Obverse. Joseph . Taylor . his . 1/2 = The Coopers’ Arms.
R. IN . BLANCH . APPLETON . COVRT . AT . THE . END . OF Marke . lane (in seven lines).



MARKET PLACE, Westminster (aka St James Market).

The Westminster hospital occupies the site of the Westminster market. See Fourdrinier's Map of Westminster, 1761.

#785 FRANCIS DORINGTON IN A hart lodged, in the field.
Rev. MARKET PLACE WESTMINSTER In field, F. A. D.
Apparently the White Hart.

#786 THOMAS JENN[IN]GS IN A man dipping candles.
Rev. WESTMIN. OR MAR[KET] LANE T. E. I., in field.

Market lane had reference to his connection with St. James's market.

#787 NICHOLAS REEVE IN YE MARK? In the field, a rose.
Rev. PLACE IN WESTMINSTER HIS HALFE PENY. 1668.

#788 AT THE SO[A]P BOX IN THE Barber's soap-box, in field.
Rev. M. P. IN WESTMENESTER In the field, I. E. T.

On a Barber :

" Tonsorius onely lives by cutting haire,
And yet he brags that kings to him sit bare :
Methinks he should not brag and boast of it,
Since he must stand to beggars, while they sit."

Wit's Recreations, 1663.

#789 HENRY WEAVER IN -  In the field, a ship sailing.
Rev. WESTMINSTER MARKET H. s. w., in the field.

Market Street, see ST. JAMES'S MARKET.

 

MARLOW’S RENTS..

B1879. Obverse. the . carpenters . arms = The Carpenters’ Arms.
R. IN . MARLOES . RENTS = A . B. 1/4


MARSHALSEY PRISON.

#790 JOHN LOWMAN AT THE A portclose : I. M. L., above.
Rev. MARSHALSEY IN SOUTHWARK HIS HALFE PENNY.

" The ocean the Suretie-ship sails in is the spacious Marshal sea ; sometimes she ankers at the King's-bench, sometimes at the gulph of the Gate-house, sometimes at the White-lyon creeke, sometimes at Newgate road, sometimes at Ludgate baye, sometimes at Wood-street harbour, and sometimes at the Poultrey haven." Taylor the water poet's Navy of Land Ships.

ST. MARTIN'S-LE-GRAND.

Visitants in a prison are thus characterized by Geflray Mynshull, in 1618 " They are like the rings and chaines bought at S. Martines, that weare faire for a little time, but shortly after will prove alchimy, or rather pure copper."

" St. Martin's beades and bracelets" are noticed by Taylor the water poet, in his Navy of Land Ships, among the gear of the Lady -ship.

#791 THE BLACK MORES HEAD A Moor's head, in the field.
Rev. IN ST MARTINS ALDERSG In the field, E. A. I.

B2642. Obverse. the . black . mores . head = A moor’s head.
R. IN . S T . MARTINS . ALDERSG = E . A . F.

Among other regulations effected by King Edward the First, for the better governance of the city of London, " no taverner was to keep open his tavern, or to sell wine or beer, after covrefeu sounds at St. Martin's-le-graund ; but to shut up his tavern close after such hour, as he will answer to the peace of the king : and being found guilty to forfeit forty pence the first time ; and found again, to be amerced half a mark ; and the third time ten shillings ; and the fourth time to pay the whole pain double, that is, twenty shillings."

#792 IN THE BORDET ENTRY The Drapers' arms, in field.
Rev. IN ST MARTINS LE GRAND In the field, W. A. S.

By " bordet" is implied the boarded entry.

B2656. Obverse. in . the . borded . entry = The Drapers’ Arms.
R. IN . S . MARTINES . LEGRAND = W . A . S.

The armorial insignia of the Drapers Company were obtained by grant from King Henry the Sixth, in 1439.

#793 JOHN CORNE In the field, a lady's shoe.
Rev. IN MARTINES LE GRAND I. C. C., in the field.

The west or remaining side of St. Martin's-le-grand, opposite to the General Post Office, was in the olden time, so early as the reign of King Henry the Seventh, called Shoemakers' row ; the particular trades in this scene of extra-civic immunity having formerly had their distinctive quarters.

#794 Jos. WILSON. CHANDLER A shoe : and I. M. w. above it.
Rev. IN MARTINS LE GRAND HIS HALF PEN Y. 1669.


B2639. Obverse. JOH . BOUDEN . HIS . HALFE . PENY = A leg ill a boot.
R. IN . ST . MARTYNES = I . E . B.

B2641. Obverse. Tho . Downes . in . st = A fleur-de-lis.
R. MARTINS . LE . GRAND = T . A . D.  1/4

B2643. Obverse. George . Gosnell . in = A windmill and a spread eagle.
R. MARTINS . LEGRAND . 1664 = G . H . G.  1/4

B2644. Obverse. at . ye . crosse . keyes . ST = Two keys in saltire.
R. MARTINS . ALDERSGATE = T . H.   1/4

B2645. Obverse. Edward . Haile . 1664 (in three lines across the field).
R. in . St . Martins . legrand = Bust of James I. between I . R.  1/4

B2646. Obverse. William . Holden . at . ye . in . ST = A man in a moon.
R. MARTINS . NEERE . ALDERSGATE = HIS HALF PENY.

B2647. Obverse. Henry . Huggines... = A crooked billet, and H . E . H.
R. MARTINS . LE . GRAND = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2648. Obverse. Thomas . Jackson . in . St . Martijis . Legrand . his . Peny (in five lines).
R. in . kings . Head . covrt = A table, on which are two cups, into one of which a hand is pouring from a coffee-pot. 1

B2649. Obverse. THE . SONNE . IN . S . MARTINS = The SUN.
R. NERE . ALDERSGATE = T . A . M.   1/4

B2650. Obverse. MATT . MARRIOTT . AT . THE . KINGS = Crowned bust of Charles II.
R. HEAD . AT . THE . END . OF . S T . MARTINS = HIS HALF PENY.

B2651. Obverse. Richard . Moses . at = Two keys crossed.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LEGRAND = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2652. Obverse. THE . DAGGER . IN . NEW . RENTS.
R. MARTINS . ALDERSGATE I . S . P.

B2653. Obverse. dogs . head . in . the . pot = A dog eating out of a porridge-pot.
R. IN . S . MARTINS . ALDERSGATE = R . E . R.    1/4

B2654. Obverse. Samvel . Rickards = Three harps, with a sun in the centre.
R. IN . S T . MARTINS . 1666 = S . R.  1/4

B2655. Obverse. the . harow . in . S . Martins = A harrow.
R. WITHIN . ALDERSGATE = R . M . S.   1/4

B2657. Obverse. William . Solmon . in . the = A lamb and a flag.
R. NEW . RENTS . IN . S T . MARTINS . LE . GRND = HIS PENY.

2658. O. the . harow . in . s .. martins = A harrow.
R. WITHIN . ALDERSGATE = T . A . T.   1/4

B2659. Obverse. Ralph . Thompson . at . the = Two men wrestling.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LEGRAND = HIS HALFE PENY.

B2660. Obverse. GEORGE . THORNE . IN = A ship.
R. ST . MARTINS . LE . GRAND = G . T.   1/4

B2661. Obverse. Edward . White . at . the = A rose and crown.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LE . GRAND . 69 = HIS HALF PENY. E . M . W.

B2662. Obverse. COR . WHITEING . DISTILLER = A Still.
R. UPER . END . OF . ST . MARTINS . LE . G = HIS HALF PENY. 1669.

B2663. Obverse. JOS . WILSON . CHANDLER = A last. I . M . W.
R. IN . MARTINS. LE . GRAND = PI1S HALF PENY. 1669.


ST. MARTIN'S LANE.

The tokens inscribed St. Martin's lane have reference to St. Martin's-le-grand. Markham, common Serjeant, and John Carpenter, town clerk, in their defence of the sheriffs' attempt to dissolve the sanctuary of that precinct, in the time of Henry the Sixth, proved that in the reign of Edward the Second the main street was then distinguished as the venella, or common way, called St. Martin's lane.

Stow, in 1598, while speaking of Aldersgate ward, writes " then have ye the main street of this ward which is called St. Martin's lane, including St. Martin on the east side thereof, and so down on both the sides to Aldersgate."

#795 AT THE BLEW BELL A bell, in the field.
Rev. IN ST. MARTINS LANE In the field, I. S. C.

Bell court, a passage from Foster lane, leading out by the Three Tun tavern into St. Martin's-le-grand, vanished in the general demolition for the new Post Office, in 1818.

#796 WILLIAM CARTER Crown and crossed sceptres, in field.
Rev. IN ST. MARTINS LANE In the field, W. K. C.

#797 GEORGE GUNTHORPE AT THE A man dipping candles.
Rev. LOWER END OF ST. MARTINS LANE HIS HALF PENY. 1667.

#798 JOHN ROBOTTOM AT YE FLEESE In the field, a fleece.
Rev. TAVERN IN ST. MARTINS LANE HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

#798* THE DAGGER IN NEU RENTS A dagger, point upwards.
Rev. MARTINS . ALLDERSGATE In the field, I. S. P.

Query, was this the Dagger in Foster lane, rebuilt after the fire ? See No. 500.

#799 WILLIAM WEBB AT YE COULT AND A Colt in a cradle.
Rev. CRADLE IN ST. MARTINS LANE HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B2665. Obverse. Josias . Aske . ye . oke = A tree.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LANE . SALTER = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . H . A.

B2666. Obverse. JOHN . BERIMAN . AT . THE = A Sugar-loaf.
R. IN . S T . MARTINS . LAINE = I . B. 1657.

B2669. Obverse. THOMAS . DIMBLEBY = HABERDASHER.
R. AT . S T . MARTINS . LANE . END = CHARING . CROSS.

B2670. Obverse. YE . Queenes . ARMES = Arms; France and England quarterly.
R. TAVERN . MARTINS . LANE = I . D . G.

B2672. Obverse. at . ye . cross . keys . in — Two keys crossed.
R. ST . MARTINS . LANE . [l 6]57 = E . 1 .

“ Stoln on Saturday night Aug. 23. from William Eyre Esq ; .... a Dapple Grey Mare about fourteen hands high six years old, trots and paces newly . . . .
Whoever gives notice of her .... to Mr. Cox at the Cross-keys Inne in St. Martins lane near Long- Acre shall be well rewarded.”—The Kingdom s Intelligencer, No. 35, August 25—September 1, 1662, p. 571.

B2673. Obverse. RICHARD . LYNE . IN = A billet.
R. ST . MARTINES . LANE = R . E . L.

B2674. Obverse. AT . THE . TOBACCO . R = W . M . N.
R. in . ST . Martynes . l = A roll of tobacco.

B2675. Obverse. Will . Robinson . at . y e . govlden = An anchor.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LANE . 1667= HIS HALFE PENY.

B2677. Obverse. Iam : Supple . at . gol = A fleece.
R. IN . S T . MARTANES . LANE = I . M . S.

B2678. Obverse. Nicholas . Tomlinson = A bell, and N . M . T.
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . LANE . 6S = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B2679. Obverse. John . Wicks . baker = (in three lines).
R. in . ST . Martins . lane . 66 = The Bakers’ Arms. \

B2680. Obverse. JOHN . WILLIAMS . THE . KINGS . CHAIRMAN . AT . Y E . lower . end . of (in six lines).
r. ST . MARTINS . LANE . AT . Y E . BALCONY . HIS . HALF . penny . 1667 (in six lines). ( Octagonal.) \

R2681. A variety has the legend on the reverse in seven lines and is round.

B2682. Obverse. RICHARD . WILLSON . IN = MEALMAN
R. S . MARTINS . LANE . 1657 = R . I . W . 1/4

B2683. Obverse. THE . WILSHIRE . SHEPARD = A shepherd and a dog
R. IN ,. ST . MARTINS . LANE = HER HALFE PENY


ST. MARTIN'S IN THE FIELDS.

#800 JOHN LADD IN ST. MARTINS LAN HIS HALFE PENY. 1667.
Rev. IN YE FEILDES . NEARE CHVRCH In the field, I. A. L.

#801 JAMES HOPKINS AT YE HARROW IN A harrow ; 1668.
Rev. ST. MARTINS LANE . IN YE FEILDES HIS HALFE PENY. I. T. H.

B2633. Obverse. PETER . ALSOP . IN . ST . MARTINS = HIS HALF PENY.
R. lane . in . the. field . broker = Two flowers, between P . R . A.

B2634. Obverse. Thomas . Ely = A castle gateway.
R. IN . ST . MARTINES = HIS HALF PENY.

B2635. Obverse. WILL . FOORD . AT . Y E . CROOK . BILLET = (Detrited).
R. IN . ST . MARTINS . IN . YE . FIELDS . 68 = HIS HALFE PENY. W . F.

B2636. Obverse. O. John . Fullerton . in = Three horseshoes.
R. ST . MARTINS . LE . GRAN = I . F. 1/4


ST. MARY-AT-HILL, Billingsgate.

#802 WILL. LAFTON . MEAL A wheatsheaf, in the field.
Rev. MAN AT ST. MARY HILL In the field, W. S. L.

#803 JOHN HIVE AT THE Bee-hive, in the field.
Rev. ON  ST. MARY HILL. 1667 HIS HALF PENY. I. D. H.

#804 THOMAS HUNTE AT Ye= The Salters Company arras.
Rev. AT ST. MARY HILL In the field, T. S. H.  1/4

#805 EDMOND LAWRENCE The Fishmongers Company arms.
Rev. ON ST. MARYS HILL In the field, E. E. L.  1/4

#806 MARGRET NORTH AT THE In field, ship sailing, 1668.
Rev. ON S. MARY HILL HER HALF PENNY. M. N.

Octangular in shape.

B2684. Obverse. Sarah . Edwards . on . ST . mary = The Salters’ Arms.
R. HILL . AGAINST . BILLINGSGATE = HER HALF PENY. 1669. ( Octagonal .)

B2685. Obverse. James . Galatly . at . ye =Three castles, two and one.
R. ON . S T . MARY . HILL . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1668 (in five lines). ( Octagonal .)

B2686. Obverse. William . Hall . at . ye . kings = The Kings’ Arms.
R. AT . ST . MARYS . HILL . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . K . H.

B2690. Obverse. EDMOND. LAWRENCE = HIS HALF PENY.
R. on . ST . Marys . hill = The Fishmongers’ Arms.

B2693. Obverse. at . the . 3 . tons . tavern = Three tuns.
R. ON . MARYE . HILL . 165 I = T . M . T.


ST. MARY AXE, Leadenhall Street.

The church dedicated to the Virgin Mary formerly stood in the street that bears its name, on the north side of Leadenhall street, and derived the appellation of St. Mary at the Axe, from a house having that sign near its east end. The parishes of St. Andrew Undershaffc, and St. Mary, were united in 1565, and the latter church not being required, it was let for the purposes of warehouses, when from neglect it became an useless ruin, and was at length rased to the ground.

#807 MARY DELL IN In the field, a bell.
Rev. SEN MARY ACTS . 1657 M. D., in the field.  1/4


ST. MARY MAGDALEN, Old Fish Street.

MARY MAUDLIN’S (St. Mary Magdalen, Old Fish Street).

#808 HENRY RICHARDSON AT THE Qu. a bear? in the field.
Rev. IN MARY MAYDLING COVRT YARD HIS HALFE PENY.

B1882. Obverse. Henry . Richardson . at . the = A bear (?) {Octagonal.')
R. IN . MARY. MAYDLIN . COVRT . YARD = HIS HALFE PENY.

Octangular in form. The legend on the reverse is in six lines. Thomas Heywood's English Traveller, 1633, was " printed by Robert Raworth, dwelling in Old Fish-street, neere St. Mary Maudlin's church."

#809 FRANCIS WOOD AT YE Commonwealth arms, in field.
Rev. IN MARY MAGDLENS In the field, F. I. W.

B1883. Obverse. Frances . Wood . at . the = David playing on the harp.
R. IN . MARY . MAUDLINS . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY.

The Commonwealth Arms is a very rare sign, especially when compared with the number of times the Royal Arms occurs. Another token issued by John Ward, in New Gravel lane, and this by Francis Wood, are all that appear to have adopted the State's arms.

B1880. Obverse. Edward . Dodson = A pitcher, or black-jack.
R. IN . MARY . MAYDLENS = E . M . D.

B1881. Obverse. Roger . Midleton . in = The Brewers’ Arms.
R. MARY . MAYDLENS . l664 = R . E . M.

MAYPOLE ALLEY.

B1885. Obverse. GEORGE. MEDDENS . COOK =1663.
R. IN . MAY . POLE . ALLY = G . E . M.



THE MAZE, Southwark.

Aubrey, noticing the mazes in imitation of the labyrinths of the ancients, formerly in England, observes " at Southwarke was a maze, now converted into buildings bearing that name." Lansdowne MS. 231, fol. 143 r.

#810 MICH. BLOWER AT YE A cock, in the field.
Rev. MAZE IN SOVTHWORKE In the field, M. A. B.

MERCERS STREET, Long Acre.

#811 THOMAS LUCKE IN MERCERS Between two roses, 1666.
Rev. STREET . BREWER . HIS HALFE PENY T. M. L.

B1887. Obverse. STEPHEN . TAGG . AT . Y E . ANGELL = An angel.
R. IN . MERCER . STREET . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY.



ST. MICHAEL'S LANE, Thames Street.

#812 THOMAS NUTT IN MICALS Object in the field indistinct.
Rev. LANE NEER THE OLD SWAN HIS HALF PENY.

B2695. Obverse. STEPHEN . HAYWARD . GEO . BACKLER = A hand pouring coffee into a cup.
R. At . the . ould . Coffee . house . in . St . Michells . Ally . formerly . ^ Boma?is (in six lines). i


MILE END.

#813 HENRY BARTLETT A Dolphin, in the field.
Rev. IN MILEND . 1658 In the field, H. E. B.  1/4

The Dolphin is rendered familiar by the classical fable of Arion.

#814 GEORGE SMITH IN The Weavers Company arms.
Rev. MILEND . WEAVER . 1658 In the field, G. M. S.   1/4

B1894. Obverse. Roger . Nickolles . at . ye = The Weavers’ Arms.
R. OLD . ROSE . AT . MILE . END = R . A . N.

#815 JOSEPH ALMOND AT Ye SHIP In the field, a ship.
Rev. IN MILE END. 1668 HIS HALF PENY. I. I. A.

B1888. Obverse. THOMAS . ALLIN . AT . YE = A COck.
R. IN . MYLE . END . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B1890. Obverse. John . Amps = The Grocers’ Arms.
R. IN . MILENDE — I . A.

B1892. Obverse. Mathew . Bro .=The Bakers’ Arms.
R. IN . MILE . END . 1667= HIS HALF PENY.

B1893. Obverse. William . Cross = The King’s Arms.
R. IN . MILE . END . 1667 = W . A . C.

B1896. Obverse. William . Steward . 1667 = The Royal oak, with three crowns.
R. UPPON . MILE . END . GREEN = HIS HALF PENY.


MILFORD LANE (Strand).

B1897. Obverse. RICHARD . ACTON . MARCHAL = HIS HALFE PENY. 1665.
R. IN . MILLFORD . LANE . BY . S T = CLEMENTS CHVRCH.

B1898. Obverse. John . Burgesse . coalman = A man carrying a sack of coals.
R. IN . MILFORD . LANE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^

Very few coal-sellers issued tokens. For others, vide Nos. 1336 and 1899.

B1899. Obverse. ROBERT . FARMER . COLEMAN = A horseshoe.
R. IN . MILFORD . LANE . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. R . F. A

B1900. OBVERSE. at . the . Grayhovnde = A greyhound.
R. IN . MILLFORDE . LANE = I . A . H.  1/4


MILK STREET, Cheapside.

Milk street is memorable in a celebrated controversy between two noble families, recorded in the Scrope and Grosvenor Roll. It was also the birth-place of Sir Thomas More, as Fuller quaintly observes, " the brightest star that ever shone in that via lactea." The street derived its name from being in ages past a market for the sale of milk.

#816 AT THE BOARES HEAD Boar's head, lemon in mouth.
Rev. IN MILKE STREET In the field, W. S. I.

The boar's head was anciently a sumptuous dish at Christmas and other public festivities. Queen Margaret, wife to King James the Fourth of Scotland, at her
wedding dinner, was served at the first course, " within a fayr platter, of a wyld boore's hed gylt." At Queen's college, Oxford, the boar's head dish is still continued, but the head is a block of wood neatly carved. Various carols are extant, which preceded the boar's head as it was borne to the table ; among them, the following :

" Caput apri defero,
JRedd&ns laudes domino.
The bore's heed in hand bring I,
With garland gay and rosemary ;
I pray you all sing merrely,
Qui estis in convivio.

The bore's heed, I understande,
Is the chefe servyce in this lande ;
Loke where ever it be fande,
Servite own cantico.
Be gladde, lordes, both more and lesse,
For this hath ordeyned our stewarde,
To chere you all this Christmasse,
The bore's heed with mustarde."

Christmas Carrolles, impr. by Wynkyn de Worde, 1521.

#817 WILLIAM RIXON AT THE A COW, in field.
Rev.  RED COW IN MILKE STREET HIS HALF PENY TOKEN.

The earliest published London Directory, 1677, entitled " The Names of the Merchants living in London," notices " Tho. Framton, near the Red Cow, in
Milk street."

B1901. OBVERSE. Robert . Gardiner = A moon and seven stars.
R. IN . MILK . STREET = R . A . G.

B1903. OBVERSE. RICHARD . LUKEY= A pump.
R. lower . end . milk . s = _ Arms.



MILLBANK, Westminster.

#818 THOMAS MASCALL AT Scales, from the Bakers' arms.
Rev. MILLBANCKE . WESTMINSTER In the field, HIS HALFE PENNY. T. M.

#819 JOHN STANDBROOK . LYME MAN Man bearing a Sack.
Rev. AT MILL BANCKE . HIS HALF PENY I. E. S.

There was also a John Standbrooke, lime-man, in Southwark, at St. Mary Overy's stairs. The initials on that token are I. S. S.

B1905. OBVERSE. upon . the . millbanke = Two men carrying a barrel.
R. IN . WESTMINSTER = I . A . A.

B1906. OBVERSE. Ralph . Fancott . wood = Robin Hood and Little John.
R. MONGER . ON . MILBANK = R . H . F.

B1907. OBVERSE. Richard . Fisher . wood = A crooked billet.
R. MONGER . AT . Y E . MILL . BANK = R . S . F.


MILL LANE, Tooley Street.

#820 IAMES TOVCHIN AT Ye RED Lion passant gardant; I. H. T.
Rev. IN MILL LANE. 1666 HIS HALF PENY.

Mill lane derived that appellation from the mill belonging to the abbot of Battle. Collect. Topogr. et Geneal., vol. viii. p. 252. In Mill lane is still" the Red Lion and Key," possibly the same sign.

 

Minories - see Minories


THE MINT, Southwark.

South wark, in the time of Edward the Confessor, appears, before 1053, to have been a corporation governed by a bailiff, and was certainly a royal Saxon mint in the antecedent reign. Pennies of silver were coined here by Canute, Edward the Confessor, William the Norman, William Rufus, and Henry the First. The royal domain was opposite the church of St. George ; and early in the reign of King Henry the Eighth a magnificent structure called Suffolk Place was erected here by his brother-in-law, Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolk ; from him it passed to the king, who then named it Southwark Place, restored the mint, and also coined money. Edward the Sixth continued the mint. John Yorke, sheriff of London in 1550-51, appointed in 1548, the second year of his reign, sole master and worker, employed this mint ; and the coins struck under his authority bear as a mint-mark an old English Y. The coinage here ceased with this reign, and the building, hitherto the mint, became a place of public resort for drinking, and was long after known as Hogmagog hall. Southwark Place was eventually in great part demolished, and the ground, gradually covered by small tenements, became a densely populated vicinage, still bearing the precinctal appellation of the Mint.

An admirably etched view of the ducal palace of Charles Brandon, as in 1546, from a drawing by Anthony Van den Wyngrerde, is an illustration in the fifth volume of Brayley's History of Surrey, 1850.

#829 JOHN BELL IN THE MINT Three bells, in the field.
Rev. IN SOUTHWARKE . 1669 HIS HALF PENY.

#830 RICHARD PERKINS In the field, the Mercers Company arms.
Rev. IN MINT. SOUTHWARKE R. M. P.

 

MONKWELL or MUGWELL STREET (Cripplegate).

B1951. Obverse. JACOB . HICKMAN . at . white = A horse saddled and bridled.
R. IN . MVGWALL . STREET . l660 = I . S . H.   1/4

B1952. Obverse. MOUNTAGVE . MICHELL = HIS HALFE PENY.
R. IN . MUGGWELL . STREETE = M . A . M.


MONTAGUE CLOSE, Southwark

#831 AT THE CROOKED BILLET A billet, in the field.
Rev. IN MOUNTAGUE GLOSS In the field, T. I. C.

#832 STEPHEN OVERMAN An unicorn, in the field.
Rev. MOUNTAGU CLOSE In the field, S. M. O.

MOORFIELDS.

#833 AT THE An angel, in the field MOREFIELDS.
Rev. NEARE BADLAM - GATE H. S. C., in the field.  1/4

#834 IN MORE FEILDES A still, Distillers' arms, in the field.
Rev. NEARE BEDLAM GATE HENRY YOVNG. I?

Henry Young, the issuer of this token, "a distiller of hot waters/' previously to September, 1666, established on Ludgate hill, deposed before one of the committees of inquiry instituted after the great fire, that " about April, 1661, being in the Jesuits' college in Antwerp, one Powell, an English Jesuit, persuaded him to turn Roman catholic ; and told him if he intended to save his life and estate he had best turn so, for within seven years he should see all England of that religion." Young replied, " the city of London would never endure it." Powell answered, " within five or six years they would break the power and strength of London in pieces ; they had been contriving it these twenty years, and if Young did live he should see it done." Young further deposed that, shortly after his coming into England, Thompson and Copervel, both papists, several times affirmed that, ' ( within five or six years at the furthest, the Roman catholic religion would be all over the kingdom."

In Akerman's London Tradesmen's Tokens, No. 1233, figured in plate vii. No. 82, is a token supposed to have emanated from the Belle Sauvage inn on Ludgate hill ; but to that it has no reference. Henry Young was a distiller ; the figure described as " an Indian woman" is the sinister supporter of the Distillers Company arms, and no " belle sauvage" at all. The fire in September, 1666, destroyed all the buildings on Ludgate hill, and subsequently, Young established his business near Bedlam gate in Moorfields, where, adopting a still as his sign, he issued the penny-sized token above noticed.

No sign in the metropolis has been the occasion of more varied conjectures than the far-famed " Belle Sauvage." Mr. Douce quotes the inedited metrical romance of Alexander, conjectured to have been written by Adam Davie, at the beginning of the fourteenth century, for the fact that king Solomon, being visited at Jerusalem by the fair queep of Sabba, a city in Macropy, the Macropii in Ethiopia of Pliny,

" Thennes cam Sibely savage,"

for her love, forsook his God above. " ' Sibely savage' is the person who in our modern bibles is called the queen of Sheba, and the sign has been corrupted into that of the Bell Savage ; the same sign, corrupted in like manner, was so adopted on the continent." Mr. Douce adds, " Sibely savage, as a proper name, is another perversion of si belle sauvage ; and though the lady was supposed to have come from the remotest parts of Africa, and might have been as black as a negro, we are not now to dispute the superlative beauty of the mistress of Solomon, here converted into a savage. It must be admitted the queen of Sheba was as well adapted for the purpose of a sign as the Wise Men of the East, afterwards metamorphosed into the ' Three Kings of Cologne.' "

These are poetical deductions. Pegge, in his Anecdotes of the English Language, p. 291, intimates that a friend had seen a lease of the Bell Savage inn (he should have said ' the Bell inn,') to Isabella Savage ; affording an elucidation that overthrew the conjectures about a bell and a savage, or la belle sauvage. Douce was disposed to treat this altogether as an anomaly ; he conceived it probable that Pegge's friend had been in some way or other deceived, the date of the lease not being mentioned ; and if the name of Isabella Savage really appeared in the document it might have been an accidental circumstance, at a period not very distant*; but a deed, enrolled on the Close roll of 1453, certifies a fact that places the point in dispute beyond all doubt. By that deed, dated at London, February 5th, 31 Hen. VI., John Frensh, eldest son of John Frensh late citizen and goldsmith of London, confirmed to Joan Frensh, widow, his mother, " totum ten' sive hospicium cum suis pertin' vocat' Savagesynne, alias vocat' le Belle on the Hope ;" all that tenement or inn with its appurtenances, called Savage's inn, otherwise called the Bell on the Hoop, in the parish of St. Bridget in Fleet street, London, to have and to hold the same for term of her life, without impeachment of waste. The sign in the olden day was the Bell; " on the hoop" implied the ivy-bush, fashioned, as was the custom, as a garland. The association of Savage's inn with the sign of the Bell certainly gave an impulse to the perversion or new name of "la belle Sauvage :" when that occurred is another question.

Machin, in his Diary, February 7th, 1553-4, the day being Ash Wednesday, is very minute on the untoward incident of Wyat's rebellion ; by him the Belle Sauvage inn is not mentioned; but Howes, in his enlargement of Stow, 1631, p. 621, notices particularly, as well known, the " Bell Savage, an inn nigh unto Ludgate ;" and that ' ' Wyat, baffled in passing with his forces through Ludgate, rested him awhile upon a stall over against the Belle Savage gate, and at the last returned towards Charing crosse."

B1953. Obverse. over . against . ye . popes . head = Isabella Bennett.
R. IN . MOORE . FEILDS . l668 = HER HALFE PENNY.

B1955. Obverse. WILL . BROWNLEY . AT . THE = A star
R. IN . MOARE . FEILDES . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY

B1956. Obverse. AT . THE . PEARE = G.C.
R. G . C . IN . MORFIELDES = A bear 1/4

B1958. A variety reads BEDLAM AND GATE.

B1959. Obverse. FRANCIS . GIBSON . IN . UPPER = Hercules with is club.
R. MOORE . FEILDS . AT . YE . HERCULES = HIS HALFE PENNY.

B1960. Obverse. EDWARD . GRAVEL . NEARE . YE = A tobaccos roll
R. BEARE . IN . MOORFEILDES = HIS HALFE PENY.

B1961. Obverse. THE . CROSS . DAGERS . IN . MORE = Two daggers crossed in saltire
R. FEILDS . HIS . HALFE . PENY = R.T.H and a horn

“Mr. Theophilus Buckworth’s famous Pectoral Lozenges, for Consumptions,
Coughs, Catarhes, Astmaes, Offensive Breath, Hoarseness, Colds, Ptisicks & are
to be had sealed up with his Coat of Armes, and 2 s. 6 d. upon every Paper, at his
own house on Mile-end Green .... Mr. Place at Grayes-lnne Gate Holborn

. . . . Mr. Hayes at the Crose-Daggers in Moor-Fields .”—The Newes ,

No. 36, May 5, 1664, p. 294.

Vide No. 1237.

“There is an Island to be let about a mile and a half from Malden in Essex,
known by the name of Northy Island ; containing about four hundred acres, with
two Boats belonging to it, at the Rent of a hundred and ten pounds a year. Who¬
soever is desirous to take it, may have further information concerning the same at
Mr. Walter Hayes House, a Mathematical Instrument-maker, at the Cross Daggers
in Moorfields .”—Mercurins Pub/icus , No. 32, August 6-13, 1663, p. 507.

From an advertisement to the same effect in the Mercurius Public us, No. 36,
September 4-11, 1662, p. 603, we learn that Walter Hayes, who was probably the
father of the tokener, lived next door to the Pope’s Head. For this tavern, vide
Nos. 1953 and 1963.

B1962. Obverse. Mary . Lacy . in = A female crest to the left.
R. MOORE. FEILDES . 1667= HER HALF PENY.

B1963. Obverse. Richard . Marten = A pope’s bust, with triple crown.
R. IN . MORE . FEILDES = R . M . M. 1/4


LITTLE MOORFIELDS, Cripplegate.

#835 SIMON BOND AT THE GREEN HOVSE, in the field.
Rev. IN LITLE MOOR FELDS In field, S. A. B. 1666.  1/4

“Little Moor-Fields .... Other Houses of Note .... The Green-house
. . . . fam’d for good Liquors.”— A Vademecum for Maltworms , part ii., p. 6.

A green house was a garden house with bowling-allies, of which there are frequent notices in our contemporary dramatists, by whom there are constant allusions to their immoral purposes. Chettle, in his Kind Heart's Dream, printed at latest in 1593, notices the bowling-allies, or green-houses, in Bedlam; and Mynshull, in his Essayes and Characters of a Prison, 1618, observes "A nasty stinking lodging in a jayle is sweeter land than any garden-house about Bunhill."

After the fire, it was proposed by the city authorities to establish a hay-market in Little Moorfields ; the project, however, failed.

Illustrations of Shakespeare, edit. 1839, 8vo, p. 62.


MOORGATE.

#836 JOHN RANDALL AT MOORE Moorgate ; I. M. R. 1666.
Rev. GATE . HIS HALFE PENNY In field, the same.

ThThe view in the field, on both sides, exhibits Moorgate, that stood across the Fore-street end of Finsbury place, erected in 1415, and reedified in 1472. Becoming impaired by long standing, the gate shown on the token was demolished in 1672. Moorgate, rebuilt, was sold by the commissioners of the city lands, April 22d, 1761, for 166L, but while being demolished, the stone was repurchased by the city authorities, and flung into the Thames to arrest the havoc the tides were causing to the starlings of the newly widened centre arch of London Bridge. Smeaton, the eminent civil engineer, had been sent for expressly from Yorkshire, for his advice, and although it was then Sunday morning, the repurchase of the stone, as he advised, was effected ; labourers, horses, carts, and barges were hired, and the demolition of the gate, the conveyance of the stone, and the immersion against the starlings, was continued with no intermission.

B1965. Obverse. JOHN . BAKER . AT . YE . WHITE = A Swan.
R. SWAN . WITHOUT . MOREGATE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667.

B1966. Obverse. JOHN . CLARKE . GROCER = HIS HALF PENY. I . B . C.
R. at . the . neere . Moorgate = A boar and sugar-loaf,

B1968. Obverse. Pelham . More . at . ye . sonn = A Moor’s head; above, the sun.
R. & . MORES . HEAD . AT . MOREGATE = HIS HALFE PENY.
Observe the homonyms.

B1969. Obverse. at . the . Weavers = The Weavers’ Arms.
R. ARMES . AT . MORGATE = I . E . N.   1/4

There was a Lodge of Freemasons here in the reign of Queen Anne.


WITHIN MOORGATE.

#837 OLIVER HOLMES AT A boar, in field. 
ReRev. WITHIN MOOREGATE In the field, O. A. H.  1/4

The street now known as London Wall is the locality here indicated by Within Moorgate.

MOOR LANE (Cripplegate).


B1971. Obverse. at . the . 3 . Flower . de . luc-= Three fleur-de-lis.
R. IN . MORE . LANE . l 653 = P . M . C.  1/4

B1972. Obverse. John . Chapman . at . the = A horse and cart.
R. IN . MORE . LANE . 1671 = HIS HALF PENY.

B1973. Obverse. John . Dearmer . at . ye = A horseshoe.
R. IN . MOORE . LANE . 1664 = 1 . S . D.   1/4

B1974. Obverse. Alexander . Rud . in . MAiDEN = The Plasterers’ Arms.
R. HEAD . YARD . IN . MORE . LANE = A HALFE PENNY TOKEN.

B1975. Obverse. Will . Stokes . bell = A hammer crowned.
R. YARD . MOORE . LANE = W . E . S.

B1976. Obverse. in . Maidenhead = The Coopers’ Arms.
R. ALY . IN . MORE . LANE = I . A . T.   1/4

B1977. Obverse. Edward . Usher . in . mvtton . la n = Three tuns.
R. IN . CLARKENWELL . GREENE = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . M . R.

The initials do not agree with the issuer’s name.

MUTTON LANE.

B1978. Obverse. John . Gardiner . at . the = A crooked billet and a shovel.
R. IN . MVTTINE . LANE . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY, I . A . G.




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As ever I am appreciative of the archive.org site and google books for showing old and non-copyright scripts which can be used for research (copied).

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